OT for home repair -- armor all on tires

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On 10/18/2013 11:29 PM, ChairMan wrote:

The tech I talked to, did say that spray silicone is acceptable. He did mention tires and rubber weather stripping. Interesting you mention the same product.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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The firemen used to use sugar water to shine up the firetruck tires. I Googled it and stole this from some forum... "Every now and then I see someone mention about how to make your tires look good. Well, DO NOT use Armorall or anything resembling it, because that can cause major problems when leaning in a curve. Now, back in the OLD DAYS... We didn't have any of the fancy stuff they have now. What we used was 'sugar water'... Just mix a cup of sugar in a quart of warm water, stir ir until it disolves. Then take a rag and soak it with the water, ring it out slightly, and rub the tire with it. Your tire will look better than brand new after it dries. Now, I don't know how many bees it will attract, it depends on where you live...."
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re: " Well, DO NOT use Armorall or anything resembling it, because that can cause major problems when leaning in a curve."
What "major problems" will be caused when leaning into a curve? Are the sides of the tires going to be so slippery that the driver will lose control? That's some serious leaning!
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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message wrote:

re: " Well, DO NOT use Armorall or anything resembling it, because that can cause major problems when leaning in a curve."
What "major problems" will be caused when leaning into a curve? Are the sides of the tires going to be so slippery that the driver will lose control? That's some serious leaning!
It is slick. When it first came out years ago I used it on my motorcycle seat ONCE. Hit the throttle hard and slid backwards off the seat and ended up on the rear fender. Had a hard time removing it from the seat. WW
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wrote:

dash. Thats 1 part AA to 3 parts water. Gave a bit of a sheen without being dangerously slippery. That was 30 odd years ago,
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Sure, I can see it being an issue on a seat, but that doesn't explain how it's an issue on the side of a tire when leaning into a curve. I'm having a problem imagining it being so slick that it causes the tires to slide on pavement when cornering.
Cloth or leather pants on a slicked up motorcycle seat could be an issue, but hundreds of pounds of pressure on the tiny bit of an Armor All'ed side wall vs. the dirty, rough blacktop? I'm just not seeing it.
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it was a motorcycle or bike forum
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On 10/19/2013 06:50 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Silicone on weatherstrip is great to keep it from freezing in the winter. I prefer to use silicone grease and rub it in with a rag however. Silicone on paint will make it hell for anyone who has to do any paintwork on the car on down the road. I squirt a little silicone spray inside lock cylinders as well every fall, for the same reason.
I'm using Gummi Pflege on the weatherstrip my BMW as someone said that was better than silicone. Don't know if that is just Deutsch-centric thinking or if it's really better. We'll see when it freezes...
nate
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On Sat, 19 Oct 2013 06:50:22 -0400, Stormin Mormon

spray silicone. That shit makes painting impossible for a year or more -you get fisheyes everywhere. I won't ever use a silicone polish on a car. It can hang around for YEARS and is virtually impossible to totally eliminate without stripping the car (if even then)
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On 10/19/2013 10:21 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'd not heard that. Thank you.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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That reminds me of the time I was spraying waterproofing from spray gun. My brother was trying to paint car with same gun. Oh boy.
Greg
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wrote:

weatherstripping from freezing/sticking.
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On 10/18/2013 10:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Water and bleach solution.
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wrote:

rubber with lamp black in it (virtually all black rubber)
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On 10/19/2013 10:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's a joke, I say, that's a joke, son!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNxksUWpZCI

if you didn't get it (best watched with the sound LOUD!) it's at about 0:30
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wrote:

back in about 1971-ish on the 24th of may weekend. A genuine "snow burnout" - no bleach required!!!!
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On Fri, 18 Oct 2013 18:57:16 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Armor all ruined two of my dashboards and I've heard the same from others. I won't let it anywhere near anything of mine. Here's an old message from Usenet on the subject from long ago.... =========================patrick wrote:

OK, if you want a detailed chemical explanation, here goes. Soft vinyl plastics (as opposed to things like PVC pipe) contain a large amount of plasticizers. The one that is almost universally used is dioctyl phthalate. It is a relatively high molecular weight, water insoluble, nontoxic compound. Over the course of time, the plasticizer will vaporize and leach out of the vinyl causing it to become stiff and brittle, which is when it cracks.
ArmorAll is an emulsion of dibutyl phthalate in water. Dibutyl phthalate has a lower molecular weight than the dioctyl phthalate in the factory soft vinyl. While it will plump up and soften the plastic (good) the lower molecular weight means that it is more volatile and more water soluble. Therefore it will be lost more quickly to the environment via vaporization and leaching. A nasty side effect is that it will take the original plasticizer with it as it is lost.
What this means to the end user is that if you start using ArmorAll you had better continue to do so, or your vinyl will degrade much faster than if you had done nothing.

Ordinary glass blocks UV anyway. Ever try to get a suntan through your windshield? Doesn't work. That is not to say that maximum tint is a bad idea. UV damage is not the only light-related way to destroy plastics. Your plan is a good one.
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On 10/20/2013 1:57 AM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Ah, it provides short term benefit, but it's wicked addicting? What great marketing and packaging. Love it!
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Sun, 20 Oct 2013 05:05:45 -0400, Stormin Mormon

That reminded me that in addition to the two dashes of my own it ruined a friend of mine ruined the dash in his 75 blazer with the stuff. At the same time I watched our fleet cars that never got armoralled go 100,000 miles, always parked in the sun, and hardly ever did their dashes crack.
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On 10/20/2013 07:35 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

another thing that I've noticed is that "color keyed" dash pads seem to be more prone to cracking than basic black for some reason. My dad's pickup truck was bought new by my grandfather and by the time it was 10 years old or so the dash pad was badly cracked (green in color.) When I was in high school I bought a same year pickup truck as a parts donor for a hot rod project and the black dash in it was still soft. Nice side benefit was that parts I didn't need but looked like they might be needed got pulled and stashed or used for my dad's truck. Pretty sure my dad's truck still has that black pad in it today.
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