OT Fahrenheit

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@bigfoot.com says...

Or 67!
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wrote:

Hell, my wife's got the a/c on 70 and I'm wearing a sweater. <G>
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GWB wrote:

And mine will complain it is too warm at 68 in the summer and too cold at 68 in the winter. Go figure.
Harry K
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I feel best when the A/C thermostat is set to 76F (when using cooling, with heating I usually like it around 70F).
My mother wore sweaters to work, even when it was over 100 degrees outside. I wear one about 10 days every year (I'm at about the same latitude).
--
44 days until the winter solstice celebration

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Terry wrote:

Three things to consider :
First, if the thermostat is behind the computer, then there is a good chance the hot air from the computer fan and/or monitor are affecting the thermostat, at least when they are on. Since the thermostat will be warmed by this, it will seem cooler elsewhere. When the computer is off, the thermostat will be more accurate.
Second, most, if not all, thermostats allow the temperature to fluctuate in a range centered on the desired temperature. The reason for this is mosly a matter of efficiency, as keeping the temperature at a constant setting would require the heater to go on and off frequently. This is not only inefficient, it is annoying.
Finally, the outside temperature can affected by other things. In a still room, warm air will rise, and cold air will sink. The floor will often be significantly cooler than a thermostat mounted fairly high on the wall. Also, if the thermostat is mounted on a central wall, this is frequently more insulated and stable than areas near exterior walls. A ceiling or other fan can help balance the temperatures, but this will also increase your energy bill.
Dean G.
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Dean G. wrote:

Four things, actually. To the below, add humidity level. We're talking about the differences between "latent" heat and "sensible" heat.
A quick explanation found online...
    Any mixture of air and water vapor contains heat. Part of that heat is represented by the "sensible temperature" of the air. (Sensible heat can be measured by a normal thermometer...one with a dry sensing bulb.) The other part of the heat in the air is its "latent" heat. Latent heat is the energy that was used to evaporate the mass of water that the air now contains. So if the air now contains a great deal of water vapor, its latent heat is high. Conversely, if the air is rather dry, its latent heat is low. The sum of the sensible and latent heat of the air is called its "enthalpy", sometimes called its "total heat".
-------------------------
In my own home, I've found that 70F at 15% humidity will feel chilly. 70F at 55% humidity will feel warm and comfortable. Running a humidifier during a heating season means that one can set thermostats lower and still feel comfortable.
Pastorio

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Terry wrote:

We have been officially metric for almost 30 years now, but most people over 30 still seem to thing in Fahrenheit. I don't understand it because Celsius makes so much more sense. Water freezes at 0 and boils at 100. That 0 C makes a big difference in weather conditions. When it drops below freezing it is cold, so having a scale that zeroes out at the freezing point makes a lot of sense. You are quite right about being able to detect a one degree difference in temperature. One degree C is noticeable while one degree F is not.
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On Wed, 08 Nov 2006 19:37:49 -0500, Dave Smith wrote:

Many of our Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson in particular, because they were rational, wanted us to use the decimal system.
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Which means what? The metric system IS decimal while the current US system of feet, inches, pounds and onces is not.

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On Thu, 09 Nov 2006 03:21:58 GMT, "mwlogs"

And had multiple units of measurement for the same thing. Units which are not simply related (as in length: there's feet, inches, yards, rods, fathoms, angstroms, light years and more), so adding to the difficulty of obtaining and using measurements.
Metric has ONE unit for each thing, and a set of related prefixes for large or small multiples of any unit.

--
47 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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snipped-for-privacy@xmail.com0.invalid says...

Farenheit is decimal. ;-)

Light years don't exist?
<snipped top poster's out-of-line quotes>
--
Keith

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WHAT?? The closest I said to that was that the light year is not a metric unit.
I suppose you know a light year is NOT an amount of time.

--
46 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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snipped-for-privacy@xmail.com0.invalid says...

You also implied that it was an English measurement.

Sure, I also know hat you're an idiot.

- Keith
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

It isn't?? A light year is the distance that light travels in one year. That distance can be measured in metric or imperial. It's going to go the same distance.
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says...

Yes it can be measured using both, but traditional usage in the scientific community has always been metric.
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snipped-for-privacy@xmail.com0.invalid says...

Right, it's a distance and it is metric. Last I knew, light traveled at approximately 3x10^8 m/sec.
A year is roughly 31,536,000 seconds. So light travels 9,460,800,000,000,000 m/year. Simplified, 9.5x10^15
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wrote:

Define "simplified." <BG>
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Half right. It *is* a distance. It is *not* a metric measure.

That doesn't make a light-year a metric measure any more than the fact that light travels approximately 5.88x10^12 miles in a year makes a light-year an imperial measure.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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"Doug Miller" wrote

I would say a light-year is an astronomical unit, and not a metric or imperial unit. Just like a dollar is not a Franc or a yen.
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 03:18:46 GMT, "Stephen B."

For the willingly confused, there is another unit of distance called an "astronomical unit".

Some people would argue that the above is wrong, and would seem to believe that saying "a dollar is not a peso" is proof of that :-)
BTW, apples aren't oranges, but both are fruit.
--
44 days until the winter solstice celebration

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