OT Fahrenheit

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Now that the winter is here I have my thermostat set to 70. That sometimes seems a little low. When I push it up to 71 it seems a little warm. The place I notice it the most is when I am setting at my computer desk. I have on the wall behind it. The desk does not cover the vent.
I can imagine that people using the Celsius scale would notice one degree more or their thermostat has half degrees.
I also found this at the roulette wheel of knowledge. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fahrenheit
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Terry wrote:

So now you know equvalent of 1 deg. F in Celcius? Your thermostat has something called anticipator and more advanced digital ones have temperature band(how accurately it'll control temperature).
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I've had three different brands of electronic thermostats. As far as I can tell, they are settable in rather small increments that don't map directly to Fahrenheit or Celsius degrees. That means that for many Fahrenheit settings and probably all Celsius settings, you can bump it either up or down without changing the displayed temperature setting. There have been lots of times when I've found that "high 20" was just right while "low 20" was too cold.
As for the Fahrenheit scale, the one thing that seems "natural" about it is that zero is DAMN cold and 100 is DAMN hot - but they are still within the range of temperatures people can experience in the Real World. Zero Celsius doesn't really seem to cross any threshold of extremeness, and 100 Celsius is outside the range of temperatures you'll see on any weather report.
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On Wed, 8 Nov 2006 02:04:47 -0500, "Nick Danger"

That's a guy from above the 26th parallel talking. We have our water pipes above ground here and zero C is very significant.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Frost line is 42 inches here.
When I got out for the morning newspaper, I don't even bother about a jacket unless it's below 20 F.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 8 Nov 2006 12:22:05 -0800, "Cindy Hamilton"

I've been outside at 20F (with no wind or rain). It didn't seem cold at all.
--
47 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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On 8 Nov 2006 12:22:05 -0800, "Cindy Hamilton"

You probably have different criteria for swimming pool temperatures too I suppose. I use the metric system for that. 30C and over is to warm and anything below 27 is getting too cold. 25 is freezing.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Swimming pools are not standard equipment around here (Michigan, U.S.A., about 42 N latitude), since an outdoor pool can be used only about three months a year.
However, my neighbor had one when I was a kid. When we got in it to open it up for the summer the water was about 20 C. That was pretty nippy, and we didn't stay in very long. I think we let it get up to about 25 C before we really used it, but that was 30 years ago and I didn't bother to commit the details to memory.
We *do* have a hot tub, and we keep it at about 38 or 39 C. It's outdoors and we use it year-round, provided it's not too windy. Just don't ask me about my electric bill.
Cindy Hamilton
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

The seem to be pretty common here in VT (~45N), though I haven't a clue why.

I had a pool when we lived in NY. Depending on the outside temperature, 25C was about the bottom end I'd use it. A few times it got up to 30C, but unless it was 35C outside it was like taking a bath.

Ouch.
--
Keith

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I'm missing somthing here. Did you mean the 56th parallel? Where do you live?
Dick
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On Thu, 09 Nov 2006 03:00:58 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@smart.net (Dick Adams) wrote:

South Florida. It never gets below 0 C here. That is the threshold that would make me move farther south.
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Water pipes are above-ground in South Florida?
I need to live somewhere it freezes so last year's insects die.
Dick
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On Fri, 10 Nov 2006 18:52:23 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@smart.net (Dick Adams) wrote:

In real life I lived in Md and the insects did just fine from year to year. The predators live all year long here too. You just have to recognize the good guys and not kill them indiscriminately. A healthy population of tree frogs keeps the roaches down.
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On Fri, 10 Nov 2006 16:29:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Never in my life have I wished for a freeze, but south Louisiana is in the grips of a mosquito invasion of biblical proportions. <G>
They say it's a massive hatch of eggs laid following Katrina and Rita.
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On Wed, 8 Nov 2006 02:04:47 -0500, "Nick Danger"

I think that 100 Fahrenheit was intended to be human body temperate re, they just missed a little. The 0 point may have some connection with freezing to death (DAMN cold).
Temperature is one of the few commonly-measured things in which, (in either Celsius or Fahrenheit) 0 represents an artificial point rather than the complete lack of the thing being measured.
--
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On Wed, 08 Nov 2006 23:08:14 -0600, Mark Lloyd

My understanding is that 0 F was just the lowest temperature that Farenheit could reliably generate.
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Terry wrote:

Put it at 69 and buy a sweater with the savings.

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Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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On Wed, 08 Nov 2006 12:13:20 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

Or 68!

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mm wrote:

I would have to turn mine up. I have a programmed thermostat. The highest temperature programmed is the evening at 68F. During the day it is 64 and at night it is 60.
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wrote:

But NEVER 65. That's too cold. I've been through that with my parents.
--
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