OT - Dodge Acronym

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Ford: Fix or Repair Daily / Found on Road Dead GMC: Got Mechanic Coming.
Is there one for Dodge?
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Old story. If you can't dodge, ram it.
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My neighbor's truck has a big sign on it that says RAM. I did and boy, was he pissed.
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On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 22:44:24 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I never quite worked out why you'd name a truck after a sheep, anyway.
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wrote:

Having raised sheep for many years, I can attest to the strength and toughness of a ram. However, the derivation seems to be a bit more convoluted than that. From http://main.ramchargers.com /
"In 1959 a group of engineers from Chrysler Corporation began to participate in the nation's new craze; "Drag racing". They started with a 1949 Plymouth business coupe, named "The High and Mighty". They had extensive experience with the "long-horn" intake manifold that powered the early Chrysler 300 series, and began to experiment with the technology in drag racing. The name soon evolved from long-horn to ram's -horn and eventually the public settled on the nickname Ram- Induction. By the 1960 race season this group created the team named, RAMCHARGERS."
Paul
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2009 06:38:42 -0800, Pavel314 wrote:

Obviously my reply was tongue-in-cheek, but that's interesting... I'd always been under the assumption that the 'ram' terminology came from some sort of supercharging/racing pedigree, and some marketing department had decided to slap it onto the trucks. Interesting that the name came from the intake shape instead...
Having successfully learnt something new today, I think I'll go take a nap ;)
cheers
Jules
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2009 14:22:05 -0600, Jules

effect.
However, the explanation given for the "ram" being because of the ram'a horn manifold design doesn't hold water - as the "RAM TOUGH" motto and the rams-horns hood ornament were used before the second world war. It was a prominent feature on the 1933 dodge car as well. I believe the "ram" was on dadge cars virtually from their beginning as a Chrysler product (after the "Star of David" emblem of the "Dodge Brothers" dissapeared)
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Jules wrote:

The name is to appeal to people that use them as cars, not trucks. Makes them feel bigger. The Ram name harkens to what they would do with what they are compensating for the lack of.
I'd love to own a pickup, even a light duty one. Half a dozen times a year, it would come in real handy. But no extra parking spots, and little extra cash, make a third vehicle an impractical indulgence for me. And I certainly don't want to feed a full-size one for a daily driver, or deal with a monster like that in city commuting traffic. (Not to mention a full-size would not fit in my short 2-car garage- I even had to get a short wheelbase minivan.)
Does anyone make a small pickup any more? Like the rangers or toyotas from 10-15 years ago? All the stuff on the lots now looks huge, not to mention looking like a Tonka toy. Big meaningless chrome phallic noses, pointless huge tires, etc. Does anyone make a truck that looks like a truck anymore? I'm a form follows function sort of person- I don't need rolling bling.
-- aem sends...
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I recall seeing a list that one for nearly every make but offhand, the only one that I can remember beside the ones already mentioned is HONDA

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aemeijers wrote:

I hear that. It seems that even the full size trucks get bigger and bigger. I've got a 93 F-150 and I feel like the bed sides are really tall - taller than my dad's '73 Chevy and WAY taller than some old Studebakers I've worked on. But parked next to a NEW F-150 mine appears comparatively easy to load.
Why is it that both the bed floor and the top of the bed sides seems to creep up every revision of a truck chassis? Wouldn't a LOW bed floor be a selling feature? Some of these new trucks ought to come with a folding stepstool shoved behind the seat.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

a couple years ago. I think they have super-sized the apparent visual dimensions, and raised the bed and sidewall heights, to make them look Big and Tough, and in proportion with the giant tires. (Pretty useless for the 2/3 of trucks that never leave the pavement. And guess what, 4x4 guys? In snow, tall and skinny works better.)
When Ford split off their heavy pickup line about 10-12 years back, they suddenly had a lot of complaints from gooseneck and 5th wheel owners (one of the few groups that really need big trucks). The steep rake and high bedsides meant the old hitches were not tall enough, and if they raised the hitch up so bed sides and trailer didn't hit in bumpy roads, the tow geometry was all wrong. Guys that pull goosenecks for a living were having to buy chassis-cabs and get purpose-built diamond-plate utility beds put on.
As a kid, I had a couple of mid-70s Ford F150s as company trucks. They drove about like the full-size station wagons, and used the same size tires. As construction go-fer vehicles, they worked fine. No, I couldn't haul a full cube of block or shingles with them, but they did what they needed to do, and a small-block v8 provided enough power. A baby pickup like the stretch-cab ranger or early-90s toyota would meet 95% of my current hauling needs, and would probably fit in my garage. (My head does bang the rear window on the regular-cab version, and you do need SOME weather-protected hauling space.)
-- aem sends...
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re: "I think a saw a couple brands advertising fold-out bed and bumper steps a couple years ago."
Now *that* brings back memories!
My 1966 Rambler Ambassador came with a full size bed installed.
Remember the Blues Brothers song " 'b' Movie Box Car Blues" ?
Next I caught a ride with gambler's wife She had a brand new lay down Rambler She parked inside of town, layed the Rambler down She said she sure could dig if I'd knew her
The rear seat was a full bench. The front seat was bench with a split back.
If you pulled the front seat all the way forward and reclined the 2 sections of the back of the seat, they lined up evenly with the rear bench and turned the whole interior into a bed.
The stories I could tell!
http://brining.com/autoauction/1966RamblerAmbassador/1966%20Rambler%20Ambassador.JPG
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

http://brining.com/autoauction/1966RamblerAmbassador/1966%20Rambler%20Ambassador.JPG
I believe the Studebaker Wagonaire (remember, the wagon with the sliding roof?) had an available fold out step on the tailgate. The funny thing is you really didn't need it as the load floor was so low to the ground (even before the rear springs inevitably sagged...)
nate
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2009 18:55:14 -0500, aemeijers wrote:

Probably not :-(
We've got a '67 F100 with the long bed for when we need to move anything that won't fit in the car. No power brakes, power windows, power anything. Beautiful to work on - the sort of tech where you can often do an emergency fix it by the side of the road if needed using spit and baling wire :-)
Sure, it doesn't like going over 55, but who really gives a crap?
cheers
Jules
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aemeijers wrote:

Oh gawd, I know what you mean about the Tonka toys. Big fat fender flares with giant fake plastic bolts. How much uglier can they get? Actually that is an unfair comparison to Tonka Toys, the toys look much better then the real trucks.
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On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 10:37:50 -0500, Tony wrote:

I was puzzling over this a while ago. When I grew up, Tonka toys were almost entirely* metal. When the heck did they stop? I saw some the other day in the store, and they were all crappy plastic. Did someone flip out over the possiblity of metal cuts or hard corners hurting their kid, or are they just cheaper to make that way?
* they may have had plastc wheels, or maybe metal wheels with rubber tires - I don't remember now. But the bodies were entirely metal.
cheers
Jules
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On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 13:26:18 -0600, Jules

Injection molded plastic is seriously cheap especially when you make it in china, pay your labor nearly nothing to be instantly replaced if injured, and then toss your manufacturing waste in the nearest river.
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Jules wrote:

I'm sorry to hear that, I haven't bought any tonka toys in a long time but down the road from me a young boy has about a 4' circle were he killed all the grass and his metal tonka toys are always sitting there. It's really cute to see. I am a little surprised no one stole the metal tonka toys. The only bad thing about his little tonka playground is that it's only about 6 feet from the road.
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My big concern is what is being called a "truck" now and where the new trucks are going to in design. I saw an SUV with a two foot long bed and they called it a truck. I'm not sure what they can haul in that small of a bed. I've noticed that there are very few new trucks being made that have the 8' long bed now. Most of the "150/1500" size trucks come with a back seat (crew cab) and a 6.5' bed. At least the 8' bed allows you to haul sheet material, such as drywall or plywood, with the tailgate up. I always laugh when I'm at the lumber yard and I see people putting trying to fit a sheet of plywood into a short-bed pickup having it hang over the tailgate. I definitely avoid being behind them in case it slips out of the truck.
Rob
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Groceries?
I call that a "grocery gitter"
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