OT: Digital camera battery pack

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Had to buy a new battery pack for my Canon Powershot SD1200 IS. $39.95 at Amazon (was more at the Canon Web site). This is a ****load of money, compared to cameras that use "regular" batteries.***
This is by no means a high-end model; ISTR that with warranty, card & all, it cost just over $200.00. Meaning that the replacement battery pack comes in at 1/5 of the original price. I bought it in Oct 2009, and used it a LOT on vacation, but very little at home. Recharged it as needed, but lately it will not hold a charge very long, so had to get a new battery pack.
***or is it? I never kept stats on "regular" batteries for previous cameras, so don't know whether I would have spent $40 on them for the same period of time and type of usage.
Curious about the relative costs, for future camera purchases (not high end; just about this level).
Also curious whether this type of battery pack is programmed to take only so many recharges.
Any experience appreciated.
HB
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Seems like Amazon has batteries for this camera from ~$13. My older Powershot A710 takes 2 AA batteries, and it works fine on good sets of rechargeables. One of thelessons fromother cameras I had was that the ability to use AA's (or whatever regular form factor) has the advantage of being able to gointoany drugstore and buy replacements and/or spares.
--
Best regards
Han
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Yes, I read you loud & clear; I was iffy about the battery pack, having always used AA's or whatever, so now would like to find out whether the rechargeable battery pack gives more value than AA's. Is there anywhere to find out?
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On Wed, 22 Jun 2011 15:22:10 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

At $40 for a replacement pack, it you could have bought about 20 pairs of alkaline batteries (or more if you get them at Dollar Tree).
My dig. camera will take several hundred photos on one pair, and they are easy to buy anywhere and anytime. I would not buy a camera that has a battery pack, the same way I wont buy cordless power tools. I should mention that I have found rechargable batteries to die much sooner than alkaline batteries. Sure they can be charged again, but for the cost and number of photos, I think the best value is just plain alkaline batteries.
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On 6/22/2011 4:28 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

When I bought my wife a Canon Powershot, I opted for model that uses regular batteries and bought a set of NiMH for her. Probably puts battery cost at one third of what it cost for a battery pack.
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Damn, Damn, Damn! I was afraid to buy an "aftermarket" battery lest it ****up my camera. Well, sadder and $39.95 wiser.

OK, will keep them in mind for when the new battery dies -- if I don't die first. (that's called whistling in the dark <g>)
Now, would somebody deal with my "inquiring minds" question about whether I would have spent $40 in AA batteries over the time and use outlined above? (heavy vacation use, little home use; bought Oct 'o9)
Tx
HB
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Yes, you'd have spend a bundle on AA cells and tossed them.
I've be tempted to buy this from B & H though, at a much lower price. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/558719-REG/Pearstone_NB_6L_NB_6L_Lithium_Ion_Battery_Pack.html
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Yes, I saw that when checking good ole' B &H, but hesitated, as above mentioned, and went for Canon name brand. Some posters concurred w/ that choice.
HB
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I vehemently disagree!
I've been all through the after-market battery scam for my older Canon Powershot. They all suck. After buying 3 different brands, all highly recommended, and all with great reviews, I finally gave up and paid the exhorbitant price for a genuine Canon from B&H. The Canon brand battery takes a charge, gives me more shots per charge, and holds its charge 3 times longer than the after-market batteries. The other batteries were cheaper, but the Canon battery lasts longer than the other three combined. In the end, it's the better bargin, despite having a higher price.
nb
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Yes, we've bought a number of the aftermarket ones and have the same experience. The don't last as long.
For those that prefer regular batteries, litium rechargables last longer per charge that nicad rechargable or disposable.
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On Wed, 22 Jun 2011 17:39:44 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

And since I don't use my camera a lot, but want it to WORK when I want it, I use Energizer Lithium 2 batteries. Non rechargeable, but good for hundreds of shots on both my Kodak and my Panasonic Lumix.
Rechargeables - even real GOOD ones, are seen as dead 2 weeks after charging, or after less than 100 shots within several hours.
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On 6/22/2011 11:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My Panasonic Lumix FZ18 uses a rechargeable battery pack. I bought a spare on Amazon (http://tinyurl.com/65evp3d ) for 13 bucks a while ago. Both original (about 3-4 years old) and spare hold charge for long time, and take a ton of pictures before going dead.
My old Kodak digital used 4 AA batteries and came with rechargeable batteries, they lasted fairly long but spare rechargeable AA never worked as well (as long between charges) nor lasted as long as the original Kodak batteries.
--
Jack
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Hi, Couple & a piece on eBay including extra charger. I never had troubel using them. I have 3 cameras using rechargeable Li batteries. My main one uses 4 AA batterries. Easy to replace, easy to find when batteries goes loq. Camera specs. tell how many shots a fully charged battery will take(w/o flash and w/flash), something to look when buying new one.
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Hi, Good source of replacement batteries and charger is eBay. My main camera takes 4 AA batteries which is handy. If rechargeable set runs low I just put in regular Alkaline ones which is every where.
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My family has a couple Canon SD1000's. I've shot a lot of videos & my wife shoots a lot of stills.
Both cameras are way more than two years old & the batteries seem fine.
I'm surprised at the seemingly short life. I only charge when the camera tells me that the battery is low.
cheers Bob
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Higgs Boson wrote:

I'm a fan of devices that use STANDARD batteries. But my luck with cameras has been dismal. I've had several cameras that used 2 or 4 AA batteries. None of them work worth a darn. My experience with lithium powered cameras has been satisfactory.
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Hey thanks for that way kewl professional-sounding analysis.
One thing caught my eye under Li-Ion advantages:
" Li-Ion batteries can be left in devices that are not used for long periods of time"
Hadn't thought about that! What do they mean "long periods of time"? Weeks? Months? Years? I typically use my little Canon for a few shots around the house and garden maybe once a week or less. Does that mean I should remove the battery in between?
Any experience out there?
TIA
HB
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Me too. Not just a fan-- I won't own a camera that doesn't take them.

We bought a Nikon CP950 when they first came out. Thankfully we'd read enough reviews on it to have a dozen NimH [I think they were 200mAh or something at the time] ready to go. the camera ate the included 4 alkalines in about 2 hours.
Using 2 chargers, and a dozen NimH we were never left lacking for battery power with that camera. I've done the same thing with cameras I've had since then.
My current camera is a Canon A520. Between having a more efficient camera and 2300mAh Nimh- battery management isn't nearly as challenging as it once was.

I only have lithium in a couple drills. I like the quick charge.
Jim
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If you camera has in input for an external power supply you can connect an external battery pack there. That is what I did when I broke the door to my built in battery pack. I figure if 4 AA is OK 4 D cells should be great. I bought a 4 cell battery pack at Radio Shack and found the cable at a camera store.. I put the battery pack in a belt munted ammo pack.
Jimmie
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No, it doesn't have input for ext power supply.
Here is a link answering the question I had asked about when to remove battery from camera not in use. Plus other useful info on charging and recharging, etc.
http://www.g-batteryshop.com/digital-camera-battery-model.php/canon_PowerShot+SD1200+IS_3_3791.htm
HB
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