OT?: Connecting a OTA antenna with internet

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I took the plunge and cut the cable cord which will be official on Tuesday when they remove equipment and do the initial downgrade to internet only. My intent is to add an OTA antenna but I want to avoid running new cable and tap into the current cables used by the provider.
I understand I can use a diplexer to unsure proper reception, though gathering info, one set up indicates using two diplexers whereas the OTA signal and cable signal are entering with the single cable exiting to the other diplexer's single input then out the dual exits. Since the original cable uses one entrance to my home, I assumed I can simply use one diplexer (OTA and Cable in) where the single exit would then continue on the one run into my home's original set up for all TVs.
Anyone with experience can confirm this set up and/or help me determine the proper set up needed to accomplish my goal?
Thank you
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wrote:

I don't know what a diplexer is or why you need one, but what I used to have was a cable box in the bedroom** , and cables I installed mystelf to all the other rooms (String one: attic, bathroom, office/bedroom. String two: living room, basement workshop, laundry room, kitchen.)
When I got rid of cable, and used antenna only I put in a VCR in place of the cable box and when they went digital, I put in a DVDR in parallel with the VCR. I used to use just a 6 foot wire for an antenna, but when I wanted to also get the stations 45 or 50 miles away, I put a full-size antenna in the attic with an antenna amp.
What probably relates to you is that I can only go two steps without putting in a signal amplifer. (This is unrelated to the antenna amp.) Otherwise the signal isn't strong enough to give a picture. I know because I added one tv at a time and could tell when I had too many splitters. This might be different for you since I'm using analog TVs, but I wouldn't count on it. When you find out, let us know.
So for string one one amp is in the closet, even before the signal gets to the attic. And for string two, the amp is after the living room on the basement floor. I can't remember if it is before or after the workshop tv, but it's before the laundry room and kitchen.
The amps have been running for over 30 years with no maintenance. I forget the brand. It's a name brand for signal amps, but it's too dusty down there to go look. They have a coaxial input, and one has one coaxial output, the other has two.
** (and one in the basement iirc, but that's irrelevant now.)
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wrote:

Depending on who did the wiring and how much they were willing to pay, you might have home-runs to each of your tvs. You still may need an additional amplifier, but then you could get just one, with the right number of outputs. You can tell by looking where the cable box is/was.

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On Sunday, June 21, 2015 at 8:59:38 PM UTC-4, SBH wrote:

I think there is a big problem with what you're doing, one that probably makes it illegal. As I understand it, you're proposing to join an antenna with an active cable television line. That potentially makes your antenna a transmitter, sending the cable signal into the air. The cable company spends a lot of time and money shielding everything to make sure their signals don't radiate. There probably is a legal and sound way of doing it, but I doubt the typical, cheap components will do it.
Also, have you tried to see if the local channels are still there even after you terminate service? It's not unusual for the local channels to still be there anyway. In which case, you wouldn't need the outside antenna. And if you do what you're proposing, I would think it could potentially interfere with whatever signals the cable company does still have there.
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On 6/22/2015 9:10 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I can assure you it's not illegal. The provider will apply a filter to stop channel frequency. The task of a provider is to feed the home then the task of the customer is to use that feed for the amount of devices they have. I have every right to provide my own antenna and use the current cables. There are no signals radiating through the air or otherwise. Cable doesn't work that way.
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wrote:

As I said, I don't know what a diplexer is, but I assumed he was going to dicsonnect the cable and only use the wires installed in his house. I'm glad you added this paragraph. No, I didnt assume it. He said he "cut the cable cord".

Of those who subscribe.

If they are a subscriber. You said you cut the cable cord.
Is trader right about you and you're all wet?

Or was I right about your plans but you're going out of your way not to say that to Trader? If I were right, you could have answered him in one line, but instead you go on about filters and tasks of provider etc. We're not going to have another difficult, obstinate poster, are we? I hope not.
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On 6/22/2015 5:47 PM, micky wrote:

Cutting the cord is a figure of speech for ridding of cable TV. I'm not actually "cutting" it. I'm surprised you haven't heard the term.
A diplexer is similar to a splitter except it allows the signal to go in or out any input. It's main purpose is to allow two signal sources to enter into one line as well as stabilize those signals to avoid them counteracting with each other.
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On Monday, June 22, 2015 at 7:05:21 PM UTC-4, SBH wrote:

In or out any input? Nice. So now you're transmitting the cable signal out over the airwaves. Illegal and dumb.
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On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

"If you have a cable or satellite system, you might be able to use a splitter to add TV to another room. Most modern systems are designed to use a splitter in this way, but older systems make you run a separate line to each TV from a central switch. Make sure you know if you have a "splittable" system. "
How do older systems make one run a separate line to each TV? Why can't they use splitters and signal amps like I do?
Does it have to do with the remote control in each room?
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the web site correctly says that a diplexer can be used to combine signals onto one cable IF the signals are on different frequencies. This is true.
the web site also says CATV and off the air are different frequencies. THI S IS WRONG.!!!!! CATV and OTA shre the same frequeny ranges. If you tr y to use a diplexer to combine an off air antenna with the CATV system, the signals will interfere with each other because they share the same frequen cies.
you got good advice.... to run a new seperate cable from the CATV feed to y our cable modem and use the old house wiring for the antenna as you like. Just do not try to combine the two systems.
Mark
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Not really. Can't you see channel 900 on cable? Is there channel 900 on OTA signal? Cable broad band spectrum has many different categories.
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On Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 9:48:25 PM UTC-4, Tony Hwang wrote:

als onto one cable IF the signals are on different frequencies. This is tr ue.

THIS IS WRONG.!!!!! CATV and OTA shre the same frequeny ranges. If yo u try to use a diplexer to combine an off air antenna with the CATV system, the signals will interfere with each other because they share the same fre quencies.

to your cable modem and use the old house wiring for the antenna as you lik e. Just do not try to combine the two systems.


Tony, channel numbers no longer have anything to do with the frequencies.
OTA uses 50 to about 700 MHz with gaps for other services.
Cable uses 50 to 800 or 900 MHz.
The channel numbers that you set on your box or TV no longer have a direct relationship to the frequency the channel is actually on.
This is especially true with digital cable channel, where there may be 12 o r more "channels" on one frequency.
Channel 900 on the cable system could be mapped to any frequency that the c able compnay feels like using.
Mark
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On 06/23/2015 08:48 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:
[snip]

There is no real channel 900. Most such actually use channels in the 100 to 135 range. Some of these are in the same frequency range as UHF from an antenna.
BTW, there's also the 95-99 (cable) range, which is just above 6 (in the band used for FM broadcast). IIRC, putting cable channels in frequency order, you get:
2-6, 95-99, 14-22, 7-13, 23-94, 100+
The last 2 ranges overlap UHF broadcast.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On 06/23/2015 03:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That's an important IF. You may need a filter. That seems to be getting a lot more complicated than running another cable.
Also, things like diplexers, splitters, etc... add signal loss, something you won't want with an antenna.

Channels 2-13 use the same frequencies for broadcast and cable (and digital doesn't change that). UHF broadcast is in the same frequency range as some of the higher cable channels (IIRC about 65 - 125).
BTW, Cable 22 is next to broadcast 7, a fact I found useful when getting cable on an old TV.

> systems.

--
Mark Lloyd
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wrote:

Sure I've heard the term, but in this case I thought you should mean it literally as well.

Interesting. I'll keep my eyese open for that.
I'm happy now. I'll leave Trader to fight his own battles. I think he likes written combat.
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On Monday, June 22, 2015 at 4:50:07 PM UTC-4, SBH wrote:

Really, you have a cite for that? That you can hook an antenna up to a cable line?
The provider will apply a filter to

Baloney. They did that 50 years ago. Typically today to cut off your service, they do it remotely, via the box. And here, even if they do, the local channels are still there.

You clearly are in way over your head. Sure, you have the right to use your own antenna and the current cable. What you don't have the right to do is connect the cable to an antenna and become a transmitter. There is a big difference. Capiche?
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On 6/22/2015 7:41 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Then you may want to call my provider and tell them that. After all, it is they who provided me with the info and told me the tech will confirm where he will apply the filter and ensure a proper set up along with my own modem.
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On Monday, June 22, 2015 at 7:45:50 PM UTC-4, SBH wrote:

Try calling the FCC and asking them if connecting an antenna to the cable system is OK, see how that goes.
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The local cable company here is going to get around that now. They are going totally digital and even if you have a digital TV you will still have to have their special small box on every tv now. Free for a year, then a bout a $ 3 charge per TV per month. The modem for cable internet was free up to about a year ago. They started chargeing $ 4 now they are going to $8 per month. You can buy your own, so that is what I did at the first charge. If I can buy one new for $ 20 they must be making a killing on them at $ 8 per month.
I did cut them off the TV and went with Direct TV for now. May switch back when the 2 year contract with Direct is up. Probably not as for now Direct has much more that we watch. If my wife was able to work the computer stuff beter, I would just goto Hulu or Netflix, but I have to keep it simple for her.
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On 06/22/2015 09:50 PM, Meanie wrote:

Confuscious say he who attach antenna to active cable tv system soon have service flagged and disconnected.
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