OT: Cloud storage providers

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On 12/1/2013 3:44 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

two reasons (a) hackability -- not that I have any thing the NSA would enjoy, and (b) unreliability.
SM: I don't know a lot about the NSA, but no way to know. They may be trying to capture everything in the way of data.

it runs off my computer, so if disaster strikes, would I lose everything IF HD was shut off?
SM: I had a computer virus one time, that killed my hard drive. It also killed two external drives. I've backed up what I can to CD and DVD, as they won't pick up a virus, later.

backup-- in this case the ext. HD -- in a separate physical location. What does that MEAN? In another room? In another building?
SM: Another building. Work, or at friend's house, or outin the car.

But if it IS OFF, contents will NOT be lost?
SM: I'd keep the HD detached from the computer, unless in use. I lost a couple external drive that way.

software? that are said to enable continuous backup of DATA -- not programs, which can presumably be reinstalled.
SM: I should research that, also.

experience appreciated.

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On Mon, 02 Dec 2013 08:53:03 -0500, Stormin Mormon

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On 12/2/2013 1:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

President Young's executive order #3. All Americans will hereby by decree backup computer files as often as necessary. Send copy to NSA for free backup.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Monday, December 2, 2013 2:31:05 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I set up a daily scheduled task that does an xcopy from our home office pc to an older xp in our detached garage. Xcopy has an argument that does a d ate compare so it only updates the files that got changed or are new. Sinc e it's a copy anything we accidentally delete gets left on the backup drive . This is also made easier because we do not store any personal files on o ur C drive, we use a second large drive. That makes upgrading computers a lot easier too, just pop out the drive and add it to the new computer.
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On Mon, 2 Dec 2013 14:07:02 -0800 (PST), jamesgang

drive, then on a daily basis xxcopied the changed files to the drive. He had a twin to the office computer at home, which he used for his home system but was also "sitting in the wings" as a backup for the office - just pop in the cloned drive, and you are up and running.
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Go To Meeting? I can access my work intranet and laptop (assuming it's left ON) from anywhere. Security is IT's problem.
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Unless you have very large ammounts of data, I would recommend smaller drives (not much bigger than your hard drive) and use atleast 2 or 3 of them and rotate them every day. I have two desk tops in sepeate rooms and they both have about the same picture and data files on them. With that is a netbook I often have with me with most of the same. I do use one of the USB mini hard drives for a backup and have a few DVDs with copies of the picutres. If you have a secure place where you work or a close by relative you can trust, you may want to leave a copy of the important stuff there.
I don't want any of my data on a cloud where others may be able to get to it.
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On 12/1/2013 9:31 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I wouldn't, because the typical HD size nowadays is 1 TB. Anything smaller than that won't be much cheaper. Since the price will be about the same, you might as well buy more storage. For one thing, the larger the device, the more copies of a backup it can hold. For another, people tend to accumulate more files than they think they will. More room is good.
and use atleast 2 or 3 of them

Remember, when it's attached to your network, it's just as vulnerable to hacking as the rest of your network. If you're not capable of doing a complete reinstall if your pc fails, then keep a backup drive connected in order to backup Windows and all your programs and system files. But as for your personal data, if it's important, limit your exposure to hackers/thieves by not keeping it (always) on your network. Store it on removable devices that can be connected only when you need access to the data. Otherwise, keep them off the network.

That goes for home networks as well. If it's kept on any device that is connected to your home network, and your network is connected to the internet, others may be able to get to it.
Separate your data into two categories: the stuff that's okay for others to view and/or share (e-books, recipes, music, etc), and the stuff that must be kept private (financial data, highly personal photos and such). If it must be kept private, don't store it on your home network. Use removable storage that is only connected to your pc or device on an as-needed basis. As for the lower-level stuff, store it where ever/however is most convenient for you to manage. But if it's important enough to keep, make backup copies of it.
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<stuff snipped>

It seems a copy goes to NSA and who knows who else while you're uploading it!
http://www.cnbc.com/id/101227788
<<People knowledgeable about Google and Yahoo's infrastructure say they believe that government spies bypassed the big Internet companies and hit them at a weak spot - the fiber-optic cables that connect data centers around the world that are owned by companies like Verizon Communications, the BT Group, the Vodafone Group and Level 3 Communications. In particular, fingers have been pointed at Level 3, the world's largest so-called Internet backbone provider, whose cables are used by Google and Yahoo.>>
Fresh personal data, get it while it's hot!
--
Bobby G.






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On 11/30/2013 10:11 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

I had Carbonite for a year and cannot recommend it.
My machine went down and while I found it backed up all my docs and pics it did not backup music and videos and most importantly my Thunderbird mail profile.
It took overnight on initial backup and subsequently was very intrusive in doing its background work. Often it would not let me shut my system down until it was done working.
I now use a separate Seagate hard drive for backup. Did not cost much more than the one year Carbonite subscription and is not intrusive at all.
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On 12/1/2013 7:20 AM, Frank wrote:

Most subscription-based backup plans will automatically backup data found in certain folders (the User profile, most commonly), but if there's anything else stored elsewhere on the pc, the user must add that to their backup profile. Also, some plans limit the amount of data that can be backed up or have a maximum file size limit. So you have to read the terms of the plan to see if it'll fit your needs, and you may have to tweak your backup profile settings so it can find all the stuff you want it to backup.

Again, usually backup services have a user console that allows the user to change certain settings to the user's preference. And yes, the initial backup will be the slowest, because that's the first time it's backing up all your (selected) data. After that, it just performs incremental backups.

Personally, I prefer onsite storage, but there's a lot of my stuff that is handy to have ready access to (as long as there's an internet connection). For instance, my recipe collection and my service manuals for my cars and my yard equipment. It's really convenient to call up that service manual when I'm at the shop for a repair or just to buy a replacement part. I don't care if the world gets access to that kind of stuff, so I keep a copy in the cloud.
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On 12/2/2013 10:14 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

I had not checked it when I signed up and mistakenly believed they would save any user files like my email. Fortunately any important stuff had been put in my docs files.
My isp, Comcast, offers something like 10mB free storage as I believe do my two websites.
The thing that annoyed me most about Carbonite was its intrusiveness and the time it took.
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On Saturday, November 30, 2013 7:11:33 PM UTC-8, Higgs Boson wrote:

Then, of course, for ritzier setups than my modest rig, there's the Data Vault (Popular Science Dec 2013)
http://www.popsci.com/bown/2013/product/iosafe-n2
A mere $599.00...
HB
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