OT carburetor question

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Back in the olden days you could take a carburetor to the shop and they would put it in "the hot tank". It came out looking brand new (the casting). Does anyone know what that chemical was?
I know to take a Holley Dual feed you needed a gallon or more of it but I am just interested in little weed eater carbs that would fit in a tea cup.
.
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gallon can like a paint can with a little basket for the parts etc. It does not work as good as the old days, but it worked on the lawnmower carb.
R
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I used to make a living back in the 80's overhauling carbs. I don't know exactly what we used - it was some sort of alkaline detergent solution, it came in a big tank, and was actually two different solutions. One floated on top of the other. The stuff on top was basically inert, and the stuff on the bottom was what did the cleaning - the stuff on top protected the stuff on the bottom from exposure to the atmosphere. It would dissolve just about anything - wood, rubber, neoprene floats - anything that wasn't metal.
You won't find this at any parts store because it's too dangerous to sell at the consumer level - it will dissolve your hair, skin, eyeballs, children, pets, etc. In this era of over the top epa regulations, etc., I'm not sure if you can even get it anymore. You can, however, get Gunk carb cleaner in a bucket, and it will work fairly well, but you have to soak the parts in it a lot longer. Be sure to rinse *thoroughly* with water, and then blow dry with compressed air. be carefull to blow out all passages. Use new gaskets when you put it together, and it will run like new.
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On Sun, 25 Oct 2009 20:35:33 -0700, "Zootal"

on top was water and the stuff below was EXTREMELY vile!!
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Zootal wrote:

I do believe you can buy it from NAPA and other parts stores in 5gal pails. It comes with a dip basket inside the can. An example:
http://tinyurl.com/yhpugjo
TDD
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wrote:

I have one of those, it's not nearly as fearsome as I remember the old stuff being. Does work though at least on greasy bicycle parts (all I've used it on so far.) Needs to be rinsed off with some other solvent though, it sticks to the parts and doesn't air dry all that quickly (dunking parts in kerosene, if it's steel and you want to protect it, or gasoline/lacquer thinner/acetone/whatever if it's not steel and needs to be spotlessly clean, e.g. a carburetor, is required afterwards)
nate
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N8N wrote:

Back in the early 70's I worked for an electrical supply company that also had a motor rewinding shop. In the shop was a hot trichloroethylene vapor tank that was used to clean parts. You would place your dirty, greasy metal parts into the tank, the vapor would immediately start to condense on the surfaces and you could see the grime dripping off the metal. Sometimes the boss would let us bring our engine parts into the shop on the weekends so we could clean them up. I miss those days.
TDD
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I worked in a mfg shop in that era and had the same thing - Trichloroethylene Vapor Degreaser. It was a large steel lined pit in the concrete floor. A large basket was loaded with parts and lowered into the pit with an overhead hoist. Had my motorcycle frame in there once to give you an idea of the size. Under the wire mesh pit bottom was the nightmareish liquid a bubbling. The vapor filled the pit up to the cold water pipes that were maybe 2 ft below the top rim around the perimeter. Vapor did not come above the pipes. You could also just hang parts in it off the edge from long hooks. Occasionally your fingers went below the vapor line. You had them out in less than a second but they were a combo of white dry and red burned.
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Red Green wrote:

That's the stuff, I read where it's making a comeback because the safer replacement was murdering the helpless little ozones. *snicker*
TDD
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On Sun, 25 Oct 2009 20:35:33 -0700, "Zootal"

Yep that is the stuff. I knew it was nasty, that is why they called it a hot tank. Thanks.
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They called it a hot tank because the real ones were heated. We had a giant one that you could nearly put a car into. It used heated trichlorethane or trichlorethyelene. The tanks had cool water jackets around the top and this would condense the vapors (somewhat). As you lowered the parts in a basket into the tank, when they hit the vapor level they would start cascading with hot condensed thrichlor and the paint and grease would nearly burst off the parts. NASTY, NASTY, stuff. Needless to say, they are probably illegal now.
--
Dennis


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wrote:

I still have some 1.1.1 trichloroethane and it does a great job on grease but not so much on carb varnish.
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On Sun, 25 Oct 2009 21:44:12 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

something as strong, afaict. At least in the one quart size.
But be sure to store the can someplace where its leaking won't cause harm. Even the weaker stuff I've bought has eaten through the can. Two different cans I think.
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http://www.safety-kleen.com/products/CleaningEquipment/Pages/CleaningEquipment.aspx
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On Oct 25, 8:44pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If I remember correctly...it was lacquer thinner or methylene chloride and methanol. Which would destroy all the plastics except polyurethane.
bob_v
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Sorry...meant polyethylene!
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 04:35:26 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa

really stunk.
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Years ago, I tried oven cleaner spray for cleaning the green stale gas off a carb. From a mower I'd found on the curbside. Worked slick as can be. I dissembled the carb, and put the pieces in the laundry sink. Sprayed with oven cleaner, wait about three minutes, and rinse completely. Might work for you.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Oct 26, 7:22am, "Stormin Mormon"

Oven cleaner would, most likely, dissolve white-metal!!! (acids are not compatible with aluminum or white-metal) bob_v
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I'll give you fifty bucks if you can prove to me that a sodium (or potassium) hydroxide based oven cleaner is acidic.
--
Christopher A. Young
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