OT -- car door locks need lubrication

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Is the "LRT" similar to the "Smart Straw" shown here?
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
I'm assuming that's what you were telling me to use to get the spray to emerge lower than the top edge of the window slot.
Thanks,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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On 11/28/2014 7:10 PM, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

LRT are what we used in the days before smart straws were invented.
Same general concept. Much less convenient.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yes I do remember them, those semi stiff pieces of plastic tubing about 3/32" diameter that you stuck (not very firmly) into a hole in the can's spray cap.
They got misplaced very easily too. I used to tape length of plastic soda straw with it's bottom end folded closed to the side of the WD-40 can to have a spot to keep it in.
Now, what did "LRT" mean? I'm guessing the "LR" stood for "long reach", but did the "T" stand for "tube"?
Jeff
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On 11/29/2014 2:07 PM, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

They were retained by either clear celophane tape, or I used rubber bands. Both didn't hold.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I got the snow shovels lined up by the deck. See if I can shovel snow one more year without having a coronary event.
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Testify!
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Oren wrote:

My father died of a heart attack after shoveling snow at work. That crosses my mind every now and then as I shovel the driveway. Especially the 'at work' part. He was going to retire when I graduated college. I did so that spring. I'm getting close to the same age and I'm still working although some days I wonder why.
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On 11/10/2014 9:54 PM, rbowman wrote:

With the family pattern established, I'd also be cautious.
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Graphite is electrically conductive.
House locks don't care, at least at my house there's no wiring.
Automotive locks are a different story. There are lots of connections in both door and ignition locks. I'm wary of introducing another failure mode.
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On 11/13/2014 9:17 AM, TimR wrote:

locks. I'm wary of introducing another failure mode.

I've heard that for some vehicle ignition locks.
Not sure if door locks are a concern.
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wrote:

sons. I'll shovel ligh snow - up to 2 inches or so, and away from doors and cars, but the heavy lifting is done by my Yamaha blower.
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wrote:

from the cyl. In the car door all of the switches are generally quite a distance from the cyl. I've NEVER seen an ignition switch or doorlock switch fail from any lubricant put into the cyl and doubt you ever will either.
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On 11/13/2014 5:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The vehicle ignitions I've serviced, the cylinder and switch often butt up against each other.
Some new GM, there is the resistor pellet in the key, and that can be affected by conductive graphite.
Older cars, with the key in the dash, often the cylinder and the switch were part of the same unit.
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On 11/13/2014 5:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which make and models are like this? I've not seen this kind of car.
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On Thu, 13 Nov 2014 18:08:43 -0500, Stormin Mormon

lower down on the steering column. Even the ones directly coupled to the cyl are physically separated - the cyl is in a casting with the switch screwed or clipped onto the outer side of the casting.
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On 11/13/2014 7:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What is one such vehicle with the rod from the cyl to the switch?
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On Thu, 13 Nov 2014 18:24:52 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Oldsmobiles in the sixties as well as many '86-98 GM vehicles, and a lot of Fords from '70 to '98, Just about any vehicle using a Saginaw manufactured tilt column used them. This includes a lot of AMC, International Harvestor and Jeep vehicles as well as GM.
Integrated ignition switches all but dissapeared except for some of the Japanese manufacturers up untill the mid-late '90s., and other than dash mounted ignition switches virtually NO north american vehicle used direct operated switch (on the end of the cyl) except for vehicles like the Mystique that were actually european vehicles built in North America - and north american build Japanese brands.
This may have changed in recent years., but I know my 2002 Taurus is remote mounted, actuated by a rack and pinion. The 95 Mistique had the switch about 6 inches from the cyl, but mounted co-axially - in such a way it would be almost impossible for any lubricant introduced into the cyl to get into the switch...

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On 11/13/2014 7:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

ago, when I had a Chevette. I some how remember the ign cylinder had a gear
on it, and that gear went to a od tha worked the lock which was a couple inches
away. Right, some of the saginaw columns. There was a problem with crooks who
would smash the cheap metal to get at the lock.
virtually NO north american

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Stormin Mormon explained on 14/11/2014 :

You only need to LUBICATE the cylinder, not FLOOD the cabin with graphite :-? NEVER put oil or WD 40 in the cylinder. :-Z
And what a dumb thread by pedantics arguing about things they only have fleeting knowledge of. :-Z
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On 11/13/2014 9:19 PM, John G wrote:

And, idiotic spelling flames, ending a sentence a preposition with!
Still, I'd avoid graphite in cylinders which use electrical contacts, as graphite can be conductive to trouble in those.
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