(OT) Car coolant question

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sorry... disagree with those two selections.
Erik
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is a decent truck too - but also pricey. Comparable to a Ranger but a higher snack bracket. A base F150 is a rock solid basic truck - better value than the Toyota in many ways - particularly if you are not worried about resale - drive the wheels off of it. The GM pickup likewize - a bit pricier than the f150.
Buy either one 3 years old and drive it till it drops - maintaining it properly that can be half a million miles on either of them - and the parts are readilly available everywhere - new or used.
I'm a great fan of Toyota - was a Toyota service manager for 10 years - they make great stuff - but dollar for dollar a good 3 year old GM or Ford is better VALUE for a truck. If you want a fancy truck - the Tundra takes it.
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 23:21:58 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm a farmer. I want a truck that can work, and the body can hold up to the abuse farm trucks get. And I want reliability. I dont want fancy, and I cant afford to buy new. I also want and need 4wd, and FULL 4wd, not what they call 4wd on those "city trucks", where only half of tires grip (something about the differentials). I have not had very good luck with the F-150s. They all seem to break down way too often, compared to GM. And I've had two of them, 88 and a 90, both had the rearend bearings go to hell. One actually started on fire inside the brake drum. I wont buy another Ford truck. GM is my preference, but I have been looking at the Dodge Ram too.
At the same time, the most depenable truck I ever had was a 78 F-150 with 400 engine 4wd automatic. That thing was built like an army tank. WhenI finally quit driving it, the tranny was dying, the lockouts were screwed up, the box had literally fallen off the frame on one side, crushing the gas filler hose so I could not get gas in it. Yet, that rear end never had bearing problems, and when I quit driving it, that 400 engine ran like the day it was new. However, that engine drank gas faster than a drunk can drink a beer. 7mpg normal, down to 3mpg when it was hauling a load of hay. A friend of mine still has the engine from it in his garage.
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 07:18:45 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

You need an F250 or 350 for the work you want to do. Or a "super duty". The GMC is built a bit heavier (as well as the Chevy - which is genereally a bit cheaper) You should have the 3/4 ton GMC too - not the half ton.
The big Toyota is a good choice too, but buying them used is more difficult - and more expensive - and when something DOES go wrong - it will cost you more.
A 3500 Dodge Diesel dually will do the job too - but too much torque for the rest of the truck if you get "RAMMY" with it.
For heavy farm use I wouldn't have a gasoline engine. The early powerstrokes were a bit fragile for my tastes - and the Duramax had reliability problems too. Nothing is perfect, but you'd likely have better luch engine-wize with a Cummins Ram.
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 16:50:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I sort of agree with the need for a heavier duty truck. This F-150 I have now came with overload springs, so it can easily handle the normal loads I haul. My most common loading, and normally the heaviest loads I haul are loads of hay, with the average load being one ton maximum. Everything else is normally pulled behind the truck such as hay and grain wagons, and implement machinery.
That old 78 F-150 used to sag, till a friend sold me some leaf springs from a very heavy duty truck. I put them in and nothing would push that frame down, but it rode like a concrete truck. I wish I would have kept those springs when I junked the body, after selling the engine and a few other parts.
While I know diesels are more durable and a little better on fuel, I'd not want one because in this climate where we get well below zero in winter, all I hear from other farmers are problems with the fuel gelling up, even with the additives made to prevent it. They're good in warm weather but a pain in the ass in the cold. I'll stick with gasoline.
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On Thu, 31 Jan 2013 13:58:04 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

So you are overloading it by 100% on a GOOD day - and the wagons are generally also exceding the GCVW by 100% or more.

Still overloading the axles and axle bearings - and quite possibly the tires and wheels as well. Not to mention the poor frame!.

Up here in Ontario they are just fine. Much better torque for slugging around the farm - and who uses gasoline tractors any more???? Sure not around here. The winter diesel doesn't have any trouble flowing here. Even a shitty B414 International will start in Huntsville / Parry Sound Ontario if you plug it in for half an hour. (or feed it ether) Friend's Toyota Hilux Diesel was even starting on one glow-plug if he cycled it twice - ran like crap and smoked like a fiend - starts and runs beautifully now since he put in new glowplugs.
Just don't get caught with off-road fuel in your road truck!!!!!
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On Thu, 31 Jan 2013 16:54:44 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

How do you figure 100% overload? Even my little Ranger will haul 1600lbs. (5260-3606). Well, I wouldn't do it now that it's 12yo but I have carried over 1000lbs (1/2yd of stone), many times; didn't even faze it.
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 22:19:49 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The F-150 is what I have now, but this one has been a lemon and will soon be sold.
I had a GMC Sierra and it was a decent truck till it just started to wear out, but it had lots of miles on it. I tend to have better luck with GM than Ford vehicles. I've considered a Dodge, but I'm not sure...
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 06:38:06 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

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Let me just throw out here, that just because a car repair shop owner says that 50% or whatever of his business is replacing in-tank fuel pumps, that does not necessarily mean that 100% of those pumps actually needed to be replaced...
:wq
--
There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 22:53:04 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Indeed. Aamco's advertisement states that half of the cars they work on don't need a new transmission. It says nothing about the percentage that actually get a new transmission.
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Or get charged for one, wheter it needed it or it was installed or not, if you get my drift... Certainly happens with in-tank fuel pumps, I have no doubt of that.
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 22:53:04 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

While I get your drift, but I know for fact several of the people who's cars/trucks most definately did not have a working pump. I dont enjoy working on machinery too much. I fix most of my own, but when friends ask me to do repairs, I tell them no. Yet, I'll often do a simple diagnosis for them. It's easy to stick a piece of hose in the gas tank, hold it to my ear and listen for the pump. If I dont hear it, I will usually check for power at the wire going to the pump. If there's power, the pump is shot. Then they can take it to a mechanic or fix it themself.
I am wondering if we have some fuel additives around here that ruins the pumps. Not all parts of the country get the same fuel, and here in the north, we have summer gas and winter gas. Who knows whats in it that may do damage. All of it contains alcohol these days too, yet in an adjoining state, they still sell pure 100% gasoline.
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On Thu, 31 Jan 2013 14:10:08 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Or the ground is bad - or the connector to the pump is bad.

Up here in Ontario we get winter gas, and hooch too.
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 19:42:47 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My 89 Caprice has lots of miles and I've never had any carb problems, aside from the choke being a little touchy. I cant complain about the gas milage either.
When this car dont want to start (occasionally), it's because the engine is still warm, weather is cold, and if the choke is closed too much, the engine will flood. I pop the air cleaner cover, stick a tool in to hold the choke open and it starts right up. This takes me one minute to fix. (No starting problems at all in warm weather).
When my F.I. F-150 refuses to start in the same conditions, (partly warm engine, which was shut off for a few minutes), there is nothing I can do, other than sit there for 20 minutes or more, or start walking.
That's what I hate about F.I. if it dont start, or some other problem, there is nothing you can do. If a carb engine dont start, you can ususlly screw around with it and at least get home, if not fix the problem. I've taken the tops off carbs on the shoulder of the road because of a stuck float, and was driving again in no time.
On top of that, when a carb screws up, a $20 carb kit will fix it right up. When a F.I. engine screws up, it's off to a mechanic, a tow truck, and to the bank to get a loan for hundreds of dollars to get it running again.
I've never worked as a mechanic, but I've done almost all my own auto repairs since I started driving around 44 years ago. I rarely went to a mechanic with the old cars. I've spent more to have F.I vehicles repaired at a mechanic in the last 8 or 9 years (since I got my first F.I vehicle), than I spent on parts the first 35ish years of driving. And I've still done all the other repairs myself such as brakes, u-joints, hoses, radiators, belts, tires, etc.....
I'm not impressed by F.I in the least. It's complicated, costly to repair, leaves drivers stranded, less reliable, and most of the engine work can only be done by the pros. The backyard mechanic/owner is pretty much dead these days, at least for engine work.
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 07:01:13 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Ever try holding your foot to the floor??? Shuts off the fuel and opens the air - without having to open the hood, remove the air cleaner and find the screwdriver.

WHEN they fail - which is not very often.

vehicles over the 250,000km without a fuel injection problem. And when you add electronic ignition into the mix, I have had less trouble even there than with standard ignition. I've had a couple coil packs fail - but not as many as coils on the old point ignition vehicles. Some cars had issues with the ignitors - but more cars had points burn out - or ballast resistors - and bad capacitors. Add bad vac advance units, sticking advance weights, and worn dist shafts and they were DEFINITELY more troublesom than today's electronic controls.
The emission controls are the most problematic - things like O2 sensors and catalytic converters going bad - but then they still run - and if you'd ever had to sort out the emission controls on carbureted engines from the seventies on up - the new stuff, in my experience, is a piece of cake. They even diagnose themselves.
Driveability problems caused by gremlins in the emission control valving, hoses, and other trash don't exist any more. If the light comes on, you put the scanner on, read the code, and if you have any understanding how things work, the unit tells you what is wrong. Not necessarily what part to change - but what is wrong and where to start looking.

And would be the same if you had carbs instead of EFI.
Getting parts for anything old enough to have a carb is getting more difficult by the day - unless you get into collector stuff where reproduction replacement parts are available - and then the price is as high or higher than for current "high tech" vehicles.
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 16:41:24 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

once it gets that far. What appears to happen is that frost builds up on the chole plate and sort of glues it shut.
I will try this on the FI Ford truck. I just asked a local mechanic what might cause that problem, and he told me to put the pedal to the floor and try it again. But since I'm still waiting for my radiator, I have not used the truck lately to try it.

know a lot more what to look for on a carb vehicle. This FI is all new to me. I will agree that the electronic ignitions on the carb vehicles was a big improvement over points. I even converted one of my tractors to an after market elec. ign. system.
I still recall back in the 70s when a vacuum advance weight broke loose in an old car and cut the top right off the distributor. That time I wasnt going anywhere. We had to push the car off the road, get a ride home, and cone back the next day with a new dist. and replace it. That was a really weird problem.

My Caprice 1989 was the last year they used a carb. It has 16 vacuum hoses. When I had to change the intake manifold gasket because of coolant leaking outside of the engine, I spent over an hour just drawing a chart and putting labels in each and every hose. PIA! Yea, too many emission things on tht engine. A mechainc once helped me with a problem, and told me to eliminate several of them. I did, and it ran better.

Getting parts for both my 88 F-150 and 89 Caprice are getting harder to find, particularly junk yard parts and body parts. Brakes and most engine parts are still available. A lot of guys restore and rebuild these old Ford trucks around here. Actually mine was partly restored, with a new box, and the driver door, but the rest was needing work. Whe I bought it I had to completely replace the entire brake system, re-mount the cab which was not attached on one side, repair some bad wiring, and more. Soon after the rear end had to be rebuilt, and now I'm dealing with the cooling system. Seems that for every day I drive it, it's broke down for 3 or more days. As soon as the cooling is fixed, it's getting a "for sale" sign.
On the other hand, the caprice is as reliable as any car can be. I did some brake and front end work in fall, and replaced the battery and some tires. Aside from the choke issues, it starts and runs every time. It will need some exhaust system work soon, and I know there is a bad rear shock, but it always gets me where I need to go.
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On Thu, 31 Jan 2013 14:38:31 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Thats the beaty uf FI. It works every time - no stinkin' choke to stick

And good luck getting a "$20 carb kit" for your average old clunker. A gasket only kit for a quadrajet is $30 to $50 if you can wait to order it online. A Holley 4600 is about $60.
A full renew kit for that holley is about $75 for a 77/78 Ford.

Vacuum advance has no weights - that was your centrifical advance.

And electrically controlled carb on most of them too.

You'd likely have gotten the same price without fixing the radiator. Generally the price can only go SO low!!!

And other than the choke - which is a total non-issue on a car 2 years newer (with EFI) - so would a fuel injected car. None of what you've had to do has ANYTHING to do with EFI. And from 1996 on up, diagnostics is a lot less of a "black art".
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Not so! Especially with some mfg's.
Here's an excellent example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-MTko-otio&feature=em

Yes, I know it's long... runs just over 40 minutes... make some popcorn & kick back.
We see stuff like this more often than you'd think... scan tools really have to be taken with a grain of salt. You really have to be careful, or you can end up eating very expensive parts, and/or blowing more time than you could ever bill for.
This is why I say buy 'real' car's & trucks.
Erik
PS, Incidentally, this 'ScannerDanner' guy has many superb automotive computer related troubleshooting video's up on YouTube.
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