OT: Car Brakes Squeaking

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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

Did you give up trying to find an expert or anyone else who agrees with you?
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wrote:

I was going to ask him if he buys his tires with the same logic he uses on buying brakes.
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wrote:

Regardless of type (disk or drum), your brakes work by pressing a non-revolving material against a revolving material and, as a result, converting (via friction) the energy from the revolving material into heat. The harder the materials are pressed together, the greater the friction and, as a result, the greater the rate of conversion - i.e., the more braking force applied, the quicker you slow down the revolutions of the wheels, and the hotter the brakes become.
The brakes are also designed to radiate the resulting heat into the environment and, thus, allow the brakes to cool down quickly after they are no longer being used. This is a very important part of their design because the braking material used loses efficiency (reduced friction) with high heat. Indeed, if the braking material gets too hot it can be permanently damaged (it will glaze.)
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Greetings JerryL,
You asked about brake fade yesterday in a previous post and I responded to you in some depth late last night. Please read my response there.
Hope this helps, William
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JerryL wrote:

....for a given rotor/pad material combination...
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stopping their car instead of the pads is an idiot.
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No one here has suggested that the traction of the tires stops the car. The basic physics you are overlooking is that the pads can only stop the car if the tires are spinning. If you try to brake too fast the tires will stop spinning and you will slide to a stop over a GREATER distance than if you had not braked so fast as to lose traction. This is why anti-lock brakes intentionally limit the amount of breaking your pads produce when your wheels start to slide. So you see that even though it is the pads which stop the car their maximum braking potential is actually governed by the tire traction. Pads which are able to reach this upper limit of friction for the entire duration it takes to stop the car will all stop the car equally fast -- no matter how much or little they cost.
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

friction materials will act differently because no one uses brakes from 0 effort to maximum or upper limit. Pedal effort. Different friction materials, different stopping rates. And different friction materials means different costs.
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wrote:

The brakes slow the rotors, which slow the wheels. The tires, mounted on the wheels, slow the vehicle due to friction created between the tire surface and the road/driving surface.
If this is incorrect, please explain how the "pads" stop the vehicle.
DJ
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DJ wrote:

It looks like William is right about this. It seems that under normal circumstances braking is limited by static friction between the tires and the road, not by sliding or static friction between the pad and the rotor. The coefficient of static friction between the road and the tire determines a maximum torque that the brakes should apply to the wheel. It would seem that ABSes increase the frictional forces between pads and rotors until the wheels lock, then they let off so that the wheels _don't_ lock up. Any pads can produce enough friction to lock the wheels, so it is the tire traction that matters. Unless of course the brakes overheat and begin to fade. I guess it doesn't matter unless you might have to hurry down a tall mountain.
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Matt wrote:

Uh oh. I think I may have to retract some of the above ...
The amount of sliding frictional force that can be developed between pad and rotor depends on the materials. The maximum sliding torque will differ. In other words some pads may cause the brakes to lock up and the tires to skid at lower torques than other pads. Any pads can lock up the wheels, but the better pads can keep the wheels turning while applying large torques.
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Greetings,

Car manufacturer's prices are not lower simply because they purchase in bulk. They are also lower because they are free from such notions as the more expensive a pad is the safer it is.

I never said that you should avoid having your brakes checked. In fact while trying to point out to you the seemingly obviously bad analogy between brain surgery and pad replacement I said: "and if I wasn't satisfied with the results I could take the brain [pads] into a hospital [shop] to be reviewed and possibly redone." Most people have their brakes checked by a mechanic every 6-12 months depending on state during their inspection. Right before a yearly inspection is a good time to change the pads if they are wearing thin. Amazingly, having brand new pads makes them less likely to fail you for having your headlights out of alignment - but that is a different story.
Hope this helps, William
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I got a connection error from google groups-beta and hit submit again resulting in two posts at Jul 23, 5:51 pm and Jul 23, 5:52 pm. Please put all responses in this thread and ignore the other thread.
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You can't even spell a simple word like "brake". You have no credibility here.
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deans_an snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

What do you care, or even know? When not screwing it, you ride a mule anyway...
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wrote:

This question id for alt.autos Unless you live in your car.
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She park the car in the garage that is part of the house.
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wrote:

Since my computer is in my house, how do I install more memory in my computer?
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Greetings,
Turn the computer off. Disconnect all of the cables and other connections into the computer, including the telephone line connection for the modem, the printer connection, the monitor connection, and everything else. Also unplug the power connector from the PC. It's important that nothing external to the computer be connected before you start the upgrade so that nothing outside of the computer can provide any kind of electrical current to the computer while you are working on it. It's not getting electrocuted that's the concern, it's that some tiny electrical charge might come in at the wrong time and destroy a component. It's not uncommon for a computer to draw a little bit of electrical current while it is plugged in, even when it has been powered off, so that's why it's important to unplug the power connector, too.
If you're not used to disconnecting everything then you'll want to at least carefully note where each connection was attached. The first time I did this, I used a short strip of masking tape to scribble a little note for each connection and then I wrapped the tape around the cord before I disconnected it. Each connection should only connect one way, so there's no need to remember how the connection was oriented before it was disconnected. But chances are you've got a nice little collection of connections into your computer, so you don't want to be looking at a confused pile of disconnected wires when you're done installing the memory!
Set the computer in a nice comfortable work space (personally, I just use the middle of the floor) and remove the computer case cover.
Read the rest at http://computermemoryupgrade.mysuperpc.com/dimm_memory_upgrade_tutorial_start.shtml
Hope this helps, William
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Pads have "squealers in them to let the owner know that brake shoes need to be replaced; have a trustworthy mechanic check them.

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