OT Car Battery Replacement

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On Thu, 3 Mar 2016 10:37:43 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Leave it to Chrysler to do something this stupid........ One reason I only buy GM vehicles....
I'd take one of the old car radios any day that actually had a knob that changed channels and the presets were mechanical and stayed locked in. When I'm driving, my mind is on the road, and there is no 5 second timespan to fiddle around with stupid scan buttons and all of that. With the old radios I could turn the knob and still watch traffic.
Then again, I rarely ever use my car radio. I'd much rather listen to peace and quiet, or in summer hear the birds singing, than listen to some advertiser scream at me..... or hear the mostly crappy music they play these days....
By the way, if you fear losing your radio presets, write them down on a piece of paper. How hard is that?????
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2016 18:06:32 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Well, GM does a lot of stupiider things - like producing an engine with the same fatal flaw for something like 12 years - and not just one, either (ignition switch, egr problem in plastic i ntake manifold (3.8 v6) and timing cover problem (3.1) - just for a few....... You can have your GMs. I've had my last one.

I like the sound of a well tuned engine talming through dual 3 inch pipes myself - - -

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On Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 7:06:53 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I say Honda, you come back with Chrysler. How come?
By the way, it's not a stupid feature, it was user error.

You can hear birds singing while you're driving?
In most cases I listen to talk radio, Tune In Radio or Pandora One. No commercials on Pondora and with Tune In I can pause the stream and then fast forward through the commercials.

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On 3/2/2016 2:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Bad advice.
9V is enough to maintain the radio, clock, and ECU memory. And it's only for a few minutes.
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On 03/02/2016 8:36 AM, trader_4 wrote: ...

...
The '99 Chebby pick'um'up had such (unbeknownst to me) and there was no way to recover other than returning the vehicle to a dealer in the factory radio. They can (and had done) deactivate the "feature"; some dealers apparently want a handsome service fee for doing so.
I _think_ that idea died soon after a'borning, afaik the later (2010/11) don't but I guess I otta' check before it needs being done.
That doesn't mean they haven't done other stupid things, of course, one vehicle has a factory radio with no external antenna so there's no reception to speak of in rural areas...if one _lives_ in a rural area it's almost like the '40s and '50s when a radio was an extra add-on.
Needless to say, we now check; I'm d'd if I'm going to pay a premium to some outfit monthly for the privilege of listening to the radio in a vehicle.
Anyway, I'd suggest OP do some checking in the owners manual first on just what is/isn't on his particular vehicle.
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On Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 9:36:06 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

He's got a Honda. I'd bet my left nut that the OEM radio requires a code after battery replacement. Some dealers charge up to $50 to give you the code if you've lost the tag that came with the vehicle.
I've got 3 Honda's. The codes are hidden in each car and also saved on my computer. I don't plan on paying a stealer just for the code.

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On 3/2/2016 7:20 AM, Wade Garrett wrote:

Hard to say. Most things intended to remain "nonvolatile", nowadays, use a type of memory that doesn't require power to preserve its contents. It's cheap enough that it's almost silly *not* to use it in new designs.
OTOH, if you want to ENSURE something gets "forgotten" when the power fails, you'd store that information in "volatile" memory -- that requires the continuous application of power to ensure its preservation. Candidates for that include "security codes" -- so a thief pulling a radio ends up with a radio that refuses to work!
In the past, getting LOTS of nonvolatile memory was a bit harder. So, some things stayed in volatile memory simply because it was cheaper ("Hey, there's a battery here 24/7/365 so why NOT store in volatile memory?")
It's hard to know where that changeover would have been embraced by particular manufacturers -- incl after-market equipment!
If it was me, I'd VERIFY that I have the "radio" code (in my hands) and just plan on swapping the battery out "in short order". I.e., don't pull the battery today and replace it tomorrow, if possible. Even volatile memory will retain its settings for some amount of time.
[IIRC, Honda records the code inside the glove box. Newer units don't even need the code to be reentered as the radio and the car kabitz to recognize each other -- I guess dealers got tired of folks calling looking for radio reset codes!]
OTOH, the design might include something that deliberately detects the removal of the battery and alerts the microprocessors (plural) that the contents of that memory are NOT to be trusted!
If you opt for a settings minder approach, keep in mind that opening the car door will put a load on that "minder" as the courtesy lights come on, etc.
Remember, batteries die all the time (though usually not DEAD FLAT; "Memory" can be preserved often down to ~2V on the battery)! So, even if something is lost, it's probably not anything that the car can't relearn (logs, driving patterns, engine performance characteristics, etc.)
[I think some cars require you to drive for some period of time after changing a battery and BEFORE getting an emissions test in order for all the codes to set properly]
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On Wed, 02 Mar 2016 09:23:40 -0700, Don Y

to complete a full "drive cycle" to set all the monitors before going for e-test.
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On 3/2/2016 12:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
<snip>

True. If you download the detailed instructions for a drive cycle for a specific vehicle it can be completed pretty fast. If you just drive normally it could take weeks to complete.
I ran into this once. Changed the battery just before a smog check and was told to come back in 30 days.
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wrote:

the drive cycle spec. We are allowed one monitor not set - and that is generally the evap code because the tank needs to be between 1/4 and 3/4 full, and the temperature needs to be right.
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On Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 9:20:41 AM UTC-5, Wade Garrett wrote:

right away. Various monitors will have to reset (become active) before the vehicle will pass inspection.
There are generic drive cycles that you can use to speed up the time it takes for the monitors reset as well as specific drive cycles for specific vehicles. Even if you do nothing special, normal driving will eventually reset all monitors, it just may take a few days to a week.
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On 3/2/2016 9:20 AM, Wade Garrett wrote:

Google car memory saver and it will show you a half dozen stating at $6 from WalMart.
Alternate method is to find a place that does free battery changes and let them do it.
Alternate alternate method is to buy a new car every 3 to 4 years.
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wrote:

cigarette lighter plug.. Plug it in to maintain voltage. Actually, a lot of the "commercial" units use a 9 volt battery and a shotky diode to keep the 12 volts from the car from trying to overcharge the 9 volt battery. Apparently 9 volts is enough to keep all the settings in memory.
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On 3/2/2016 12:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, a 9V battery and a Schottky would work. Or a 12V battery borrowed from a power tool and a silicon diode would also work. Or an 8AA holder ((Amazon.com product link shortened)) and a silicon diode.
Where would you go to buy one diode now that Radio Shack is gone? In my area I could go to a bunch of places, but I am in Silicon Valley.
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On 3/3/2016 5:33 PM, sms wrote:

Take apart damn near any piece of "kit" -- wall wart, lamp dimmer, PC, etc.
Bridge out of a (car) battery charger, alternator, UPS, etc.
Use an LED out of one of those "extra" remotes lying around (you know, the one from that old TV that you discarded 6 years ago), solar landscape light, etc.
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wrote:

find - or just use a resistor or a light bulb - - - as described earlier.
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On Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 7:33:32 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:

Radio Shack isn't gone. They only closed some stores. How can one person be wrong about so many things?
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On 3/2/2016 6:20 AM, Wade Garrett wrote:

You will likely lose any saved fault codes. In California this is a problem if you're about to go for a smog check because the self-tests can take weeks to complete unless you follow the specific drive cycle to complete them quickly.
I had this happen. I went to get a smog check and they said to come back in a few weeks because they could not perform it until the self-tests were complete. If you have an OBD-II Bluetooth dongle, and an Android device, you can buy the Torque Pro program ($4.95) and read the codes.
You don't need much to make a battery "keeper." A 12V battery from a power tool and a diode would do it.
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I think I jumped using portable pack once before removing battery for some reason. Just make sure dome lights off and disconnect hood light if It has one.
Greg
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On Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 6:20:41 AM UTC-8, Wade Garrett wrote:

If your car/truck has OBD-II, the ECM will need to "relearn" it's operating characteristics. In other words, don't go out and try to "smog" it anytime soon
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