OT - Canada for President

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The 2000 election cemented that for me. It was enough of a circus just in a few precincts in FL. Can you imagine the hooha if every single precinct in the US had to be recounted (multiple times).
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wrote:

so
Yep. As a nurse, you're aware that out of 69 judges, it's likely at least one is going to be a borderline personality. The Virginia primary exclusion (where R nominees failed to secure enough valid signatures to get themselves "listed") is going to a much greater disruption to the R's. No D had anything to do with bringing that bad outcome about. It was a self-inflicted wound.
-- Bobby G.
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I doubt it. I don't see how VA will be ANY disruption to process, especially by the time it runs around. Other than that, agreement.
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wrote:

least
exclusion
themselves
I don't agree. Virginia, as a state that's now in R control, is pretty important to the perceptions if not the process. I think my badly written statement ("going to *be* a much greater disruption") may still end up being true because Orly Taitz will not have disrupted the D nominating process in any way.
Orly is a publicity junkie - you know the type - who's actually done harm to the concept of any deep forensic examination of the documents in question. She needed to have a working legal theory, document experts and a a valid and unforged birth certificate from somewhere else. The evidence she presents is not even circumstantial. They claim his SSN should be something other than what it is. I learned after being involved in a domestic attempted murder case that the Feds will cheerfully assign you (well, maybe not cheerfully) a new SSN in a number of circumstances - I'm pretty sure they can do that for a President whose SSN has been compromised. It's all "what if" sort of information and as the US District Court judge said, utterly unprofessional for her to offer as proof of anything.
http://articles.latimes.com/2011/dec/23/local/la-me-birthers-obama-20111223 says:
<<Among those challenging Obama's eligibility for the presidency is the Rev. Wiley S. Drake, a Buena Park minister who once called on his First Southern Baptist Church flock to pray for Obama's death. Drake's attorney, Gary Kreep, said he would file for high-court review because going back to the 9th Circuit "wouldn't get us very far.">>
Aside from the naked hate driving the process, even Dickens couldn't have gotten away with a lawyer named Kreep. (-:
The LA Times article points out what Orly's been missing:
<<One element required of plaintiffs to establish that they have a right to sue is identifying an injury that the court has the power to redress. None of the other plaintiffs suffered any harm caused by Obama, the court said, and the defeated candidates "cannot claim competitive standing because they were no longer candidates when they filed their complaint.">>
Will they manage to revive the issue this time around while candidates are in a position to be harmed? Maybe. We'll see how the Georgia protest suit goes.
-- Bobby G.
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You asked the question and I answered it. The fact is that the state's determine who gets placed on the ballot.
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I believe that indeed each state has their own rules, subject of course to appeal. (ducking)
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On 1/25/12 8:30 PM, Han wrote:

The California Secretary of State removed Eldridge Cleaver from the ballot because he wasn't 35 years old at the time. That must've been 40 years ago or so.
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LOL
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For the primary. I don't think the state has as much say over the national election, but would be willing to look at evidence to the contrary.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

You've got it backwards. The state has very little, if any, say in the primaries - they are run by the political parties - and almost complete say over the general election.
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Absolutely wrong.
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Sorry but that doesn't really qualify as "evidence to the contrary"
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Um, okay.
First, you've got to understand that the voters in a state do not vote for president and vice-president - they vote for a slate of "electors." These "electors" are chosen by each political party and the official party submits a certified list to the Secretary of State of each state who, in turn, orders that slate to be placed on the ballot.
The electors could be pledged to vote for a sack of anvils, but if the slate is put forth by a legitimate political party, that slate goes on the ballot. Admittedly, most states put the name of the party's presidential candidate on the ballot, as a shorthand, but the voter is not actually voting for that named person.
As for the rest of the ballot, the candidates, from Inspector of Hides & Animals to Governor are submitted by the various political parties. The state, itself, has no say in that list, aside from the obvious (e.g., resident, citizen, of legal age, etc.). A candidate for Congress or Governor does NOT (usually) apply to the state itself nor does the state have any (well, much) control over an individual's candidacy.
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Which, so far at least doesn't address the issue at hand which is can a state keep a nominated person off of a ballot. Even if being used a short hand. I would also doubt any real impact since the electors can vote for whoever they want to in most states(at least in theory), then those beholden to the Dems would most likely vote for the Dem nominee even if kept off of the ballot.

These are state offices and thus under the control of the State, although technically Congress has the final right under the constitution to say who gets in the club. (Seldom, if ever, used.)
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

That's exactly the point: the state has NO SAY WHATSOEVER in who will be on the ballot. Okay, there are rare exceptions such as an open election to fill a vacancy where state procedures vary wildly, but in the main, again, the state merely records what the political parties have established and have NO discretion in the matter.
When a political party submits a name to the authority charged with oversight (usually the Secretary of State), that name MUST appear on the ballot. Officers of a state's government are completely impotent.
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That's not really true. The state makes the rules. Because state officials have limited power does not mean the state does.

This is only true because the state has made the rules such that parties can submit names for office. The state has made rules for names (mainstream party and non) to be placed on the ballot. That's hardly saying that the state has no power to do so.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Agree with all, but the discussion (I thought) was about what IS, not how IS came to be.
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But the states still have the power to change the rules. Evidence the relatively recent changes binding electors to the candidates winning the popular vote.
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THAT was my point. The Constitution only gives minimums (age, residency, etc) and the states pretty much run it on their own after that. The US Code gets involved, but mainly more having to do with things like you can't intimidate voters, and some financing issues if SCOTUS doesn't decide to get involved.
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You said;
"For the primary. I don't think the state has as much say over the national election, but would be willing to look at evidence to the contrary."
That's just wrong. The states have almost complete say over how their elections are run (there are no "national" elections), other than obvious things like those in the BoR.
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