OT, but electronic

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The first modem I had was 300 baud. It had a cradle for the handset. :)
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Oren wrote: <snip>

<snip>
Nope. There were 300 baud, 110 (or was it 150?) baud, and maybe even some before those.
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CJT wrote:

75 and 150 baud - old Model 33 teletype modems. I are official old. :-D
Yours aye, W. Underhill
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CJT wrote:

I seem to recall a 75 baud in the early 70s for printers, which were the terminals back then. (There were vicious arguments over which was better, a hardcopy terminal or a CRT. I always wondered what happened to those hardcopy people!)
John
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John wrote:

We're still here... :)
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I found the following baud rates listed in some UART documentation:
50 75 134.5 150 300 600 1,200 1,800 2,400 3,600 4,800 7,200 9,600 19,200 38,400 57,600 115,200
Source: documentation for Commodore 6551 and those used in the PC.
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http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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Oren wrote:

I remember when the "experts" said 1200 baud was the maximum speed that could ever be achieved over regular phone lines, that it was physically and logically impossible to go faster.
John
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Pick up the phone and listen for noise. Punch a number to get the dial tone to stop. Have you had rain recently? Water getting into the lines can promote noise which kill modem performance

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wrote:

Its just a theoretical argument. Since the latest generation of communications hardware runs in megabit speeds it will have error checking algorithms. If it doesn't receive the correct response within a number of microseconds it will try again and after X number of tries it will drop the connection as faulty. This test treshold takes less than a second. First generation modems won't pass it.
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I forgot to say that too. This wasn't a first generation modem, it was 56K v.90 or 92.
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wrote:

I've saved all the replies. Thank you all.
But I'm not going to do anything until the next time it doesn't work. I realize now that I wasn't clear -- I apologize -- but I actually wasn't asking for help, just telling you how it stopped working and then seemed to work again after being without power for a while. I thought that would be an incident useful to know about.
I should add, that before I turned it off for 90 minutes, I turned it off for about 30 seconds and it didnt' work when I turned it on.
And that months ago, I had turned it off for only 5 or 10 seconds on occasion and that it would work fine when turned on again.
So it seems like being off-power for 90 minutes really helped.
If it had just stopped working, that would have been less interesting, but I thought the 4800 connections the night before were interesting.
It's still working now. I disconnected and reconnected once since I first posted.
Thanks again.
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DA had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/OT-but-electronic-233871-.htm :
mm wrote:

Since you've mentioned a UPS:
Those usually have modem surge protectors nowadays. If you had yours plugged into a surge protector, remove that and plug it into the phone line directly. Surge protectors can interfere with latest high speed modem protocols.
Well, that said, however, it would be wise to disconnect your modem during thunderstorms if you bypass a surge protector.
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