OT break in oil for a new car

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wrote:

Even so, the presence of his question in THIS newsgroup has no effect on you. None whatsoever.
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wrote:

Irrelevent whining.
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wrote:

Me whining? You're the one being a little bitch about what you consider OT subjects. If you don't like reading certain subjects, don't read them. That's easy for most normal adults. How about you?
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try alt.autos.honda. "tegger" knows what he's talking about.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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in oil, but not many. Break in oil was mostly used by shops after rebuilding an engine. On a rebuilt engine, things were mighty tight as a rule, what with new inserts and rings. Break in oil was usually drained and replace with regular oil at 250 miles. The theory was that the lighter oil helped parts seat in. Any metal shavings, burrs, etc would be drained at 250 miles along with the oil. Seemed to work then, but now days, I don't think it is used at all.
Bob-tx
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Metspitzer wrote:

No. Yes. It's up to you.
Last new vehicle I bought (still have it) is a 2000 Chevy 3500 Express Van. No early oil change was specified but it did say to go easy on it until so many miles. I'm one who sometimes can't leave good enough alone, so I changed the oil at close to 1000 miles. Two surprises at once. First was a magnetic drain plug like they used to sell only at places like "JC Witney". Second surprise was all the metal filings stuck to the magnet! There was a lot, well in my eyes it was a lot. It was enough that I changed the oil again after 2000 miles (and that put me back on the 3K mile intervals). The second oil change had much less metal stuck to the magnet. After that there has always been much much less on the magnet, just a little "fuzz".
My biggest surprise was the good old magnetic drain plug. I had never seen one in actual use before and this one came from the factory. JC whitney was 20 years ahead of their time.
I also go with the 3K mile oil change. Many say it's a waste, but what the hell, in the 70,000 miles I have on that van, oil changes have only cost me about $500. An estimated $700 every 100,000 miles? That I can afford for peace of mind. If I can afford about $14,000. in gasoline/100000 miles, the oil changes are a drop in the bucket.
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Those metal shavings are the reason why alert, experienced drivers behind you have to push the recirculate button. :-)
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So why not drop that $350 difference in my bucket? I've not changed oil at 3000 miles in the past 25 years and I've never had an oil related problem in cars that I've put up to 200,000 miles on. Why waste money on oil changes when you can buy a case of beer instead?
Your money, do as you please, but mine will be put to better use.
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wrote:

The particles that you see in the oil that cause it to look "dirty" are too small to hurt anything. They remain in suspension and never come between metal pieces, and therefore don't cause wear. The oil filter will remove anything big enough to cause any damage.
I used to work at a gas station, and I remember once this old famer coming in. We checked his oil, he took a look at the dip stick, rubbed it between his fingers, and goes "yep, feels gritty, must be time for an oil change". By then I had learned to just keep my mouth shut, smile and change the oil. There was no way we could ever convince him that "gritty" oil would destroy the engine in about five minutes flat. He was happy, and his oil got changed when it needed to ...
Some industrial equipment have pressure guages across the oil filter, and they don't change the oil filter until it's plugged enough that a certain amount of pressure develops across it. The reasoning is that a filter partilly plugged filters finer particles then a brand new one. They won't change the filter until right before it starts to bypass. I don't think they do that today - easier to just replace it regularly rather then watch the pressure guage and catch it shortly before it bypasses.
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Zootal wrote:

Most auto engines oil filters bypass oil even when the filter is brand new. They do it when the engine is cold and also when the motor is revved past a certain point.
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wrote:

regulator does. Two totally fdifferent animals.
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Yah - the filters only bypass when the filter element is sufficiently plugged. Oil pumps have a pressure regulator that bleeds oil back into the crankcase if the max pressure is exceeded. This happens at cold startup and high rpm.
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wrote:

FWIW - one of my old instructors built race car engines, and he told us of the time he put a high volume oil pump into one of his engines. Took it out on the track and the engine siezed before he completed one lap. Come to find out that the drain holes in the head were not big enough to drain the oil into the pan as fast as it was getting pumped to the rocker arms. The top of the engine filled up with the oil, oil pan went empty, and bye bye engine.
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 23:21:18 -0500, clare wrote:

and it's fun when they break on old vehicles and the engine's sitting there recirculating unfiltered oil - then the particles jam up whatever the smallest oilway is and things go bad from there...
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I thought at least some filters have a bypass in them? Maybe not but yes on the pressure regulator, wasn't thinking, just typing.
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On Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:06:40 -0500, Tony wrote:

Maybe. The last old car I had used a cartridge filter (i.e. the cartridge was replacable, but the housing was retained - unlike modern filters where the whole filter can is swapped). The cartridge was held in place under spring tension by what was essentially a valve - too much pressure (or a blocked filter) and the valve would open.
Whether any modern "all in one" filters have a built-in mechanism like that though, I don't know.
cheers
Jules
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Jules wrote:

Do you remember the toilet paper oil filter cartridge kits? It was a reusable filter replacement for the spin on throw away filters. I saw ads for them but never got my hands on one of them. Some toilet tissues I've come across remind me of oil filter media material. OUCH!
TDD
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wrote:

MOST filters have a bypass on them, but they are set to bypass when the pressure difference across the filter gets too high (blocked filter) GENERALLY they do not come into play from cold, and virtually never because of high engine speed (which increases oil flow - and therefore pressure across the engine clearances, but not the filter.)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

All oil filters restrict oil flow. Some more and some less. If they didn't, they couldn't filter. Cold oil is less fluid and causes the pressure difference to increase. Revving the engine pumps oil faster. Wherever there is a restriction the greater the pressure difference.
One very cold day I saw a guy at work start his car. He always revved it up when it started, and he only used 30 weight oil. That cold day the oil filter blew out from all the pressure and he had quite a mess to clean up and a filter to replace. I suppose the bypass or regulator in the motor was a little too little, or a little to slow opening up.
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Tony wrote: ...

Which is why any modern vehicle will specify multi-grade oil. There the viscosity is modified by the additives to _not_ increase drastically w/ temperature...
The failure you state was an extreme aberration at best; I'd think it more than likely it was a case of either wrong oil or cheap filter or combination of both and perhaps other causes as well...
--
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