OT break in oil for a new car

Page 1 of 5  

Do new cars still come with break in oil? Did they ever? I have always heard that the oil that came with a new car should be changed sooner.
I just checked the owners manual of a new Honda and found no special instructions for the first oil change.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/20/2009 6:34 PM, Metspitzer wrote:

My Subaru's call for first oil change at 3,000 miles and every 7,500 there after. I don't think there is a standard and don't think there is a "break in oil" per se but during the break in period there is more metallic particle built up in the oil as the engine parts wear to fit which would warrant early oil change. Tolerances should be better today and there should be less wear. Personally, I'd probably make the first oil change at half the manual recommendation. Can't hurt and may help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My lawnmower said to do the first oil change at a few hours, but it has no oil filter to catch any metal shavings left from making it. Cars have good filters, maybe 70 years ago they didnt. I dont know if it matters, some even come with Mobil 1 synthetic now new.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Metspitzer wrote:

It is no longer 1950. The oil in the engine is the same as you'd use at any time. I tend to change the first time at 4 to 5000 rather than the 7500 normally I use and I do take it easy for the first 1000 miles. I got a new car last Satuday and I've not gone above 4000 rpm or 75 mph yet, but I only have 570 miles so far.
In a few weeks I'll wind it up. This new Sonata V-6 has 15HP more than my old car with the same engine. The rated top speed is 134 mph but the most I've done was 115 in the old one . Maybe I'll go for it in this one.
If you follow the recommendations of the oil change places and change at 3000 miles, you are wasting money. Unless, of course, you only drive that many miles a year. Don't belive them that you need the transmission flush either. Follow the book, not the dealer or Jiffy Lube type of place. They are interested in making money, not helping you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's profound advice. I've heard that transmission flush are typically not useful, and may be harmful.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's why Jiffy Lube doesn't do the transmission flush. :-)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiCAJ8ULnaI

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

    Some do most, I believe don't.

    I don't know if the auto manufacturers ever recommended that, but it is a common recommendation.

That is becoming the norm. In your dad's day (that would likely be my day) they often recommended a short oil change for a new car. Today engines and oils are a lot different. It is best to check your owner's manual and follow the instructions given to you by the guys who really know and are not guessing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Years ago the factory shipped the cars in with a very light engine oil. You were instructed to drive the car at a very low speed for X amount of miles then gradually raise the speed on the car. After a short period of time you were told to change the oil to a normal viscosity. Reason for this was that the factory couldn't maintain the close tolerances of engine parts like they can today. On your first engine oil change on the older cars you could actually feel metal that wore away mixed in with the oil. In todays cars the only limitation the factory wants you to maintain is not to make any jack rabbit starts at the beginning so that all the moving parts can settle in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 19:36:22 -0500, Sanity wrote:

For '70s stuff I was always told just not to stress the engine - there was no real need to limit peak rpm or speed (within reasonable limits), just not to put too much load on the engine. I think it was oil change at 500 miles, then another at 1500, then normal cycle after that.
I don't think that's been true on new-from-factory cars for decades, though (they'll do all the necessary running-in there before delivery, presumably to avoid the unwary taking delivery of the car and blowing the engine) - but presumably still applies to modern rebuilt engines.

Yeah - I was used to there being a little magnet in the sump drain plug, and this'd come out first time with a big column of swarf on it...
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's the only answer which matters, since it applies to your actual car.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Cars in the past came with a special break-in oil - and needed it - and needed it changed early, but not too early.
Today's engines have much finer finish tollerances and are basically "broken in" when they are first assembled. VERY little initial wear occurs - VERY little metal ends up in the oil at the first change..
Current wisdom in regards to break-in procedure is "jump in and drive it like you stole it"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You've already answered your own question. Why do you ask a question to this group when you will probably get half of the respondents with the wrong answer and the other half may just be guessing?
Not that it makes any difference to your situation but my car, not a Honda, needed its break-in oil changed at 1200 miles. This was not a ploy to get more money from the buyer because all maintenance for the first four years, or 50K miles, was included.
Gordon Shumway
Our Constitution needs to be used less as a shield for the guilty and more as a sword for the victim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What model & year Honda?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 20:46:42 -0500, "JoeSpareBedroom"

What part of "not a Honda" didn't you understand?
Gordon Shumway
Our Constitution needs to be used less as a shield for the guilty and more as a sword for the victim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry. Read too fast. What make, model and year?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry. Read too fast. What make, model and year?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry. Read too fast. What make, model and year?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry. Read too fast. What make, model and year?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 23:00:25 -0500, "JoeSpareBedroom"

2006 BMW M3
Gordon Shumway
Our Constitution needs to be used less as a shield for the guilty and more as a sword for the victim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>>
That's probably true for most of the questions asked. It just does a good to hear the varying range of opinions and the reasons behind them, if there is one. It's one of the reasons that I come here. No flame intended, Gordon. Later, Chuck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.