OT: Bombers over the house!

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On 8/28/2016 11:18 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

We live in the general flight path of a small airport and have gotten to see all sorts of old aircraft fly over us. It's a sight to see for sure!
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Maggie

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SW Florida and Florida in general was a hot bed of WWII aviation. The nervous hospital up in Arcadia (GP Wood) was an air base too. When they renovated it for Juvenile Justice it was one of my inspector projects. I was amazed at how well those old buildings were put together. Page was an air base too.
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On Saturday, August 27, 2016 at 5:36:17 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

The Yankee Air Force (I believe they've renamed themselves, but I'll go to my grave thinking of them that way) had their air show last weekend.
<http://yankeeairmuseum.org/ I always know when the B-17 is flying; those engines make a characteristic sound.
Cindy Hamilton
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Good to see that so many of you are so interested in these warbirds. While I've never been a pilot I've always been super interested in 1940-1955 military aircraft. My office was 2 miles from the end of the primary runway at Pratt & Whitney here in CT and often I would sit at my desk staring out the window watching many aircraft approach and land. The old radials (wasps/double wasps) used to fly in for repair. They even mounted a JT-9D (the engine developed for the 747) on a B-52 and used to test it at that field. One week they actually flew in a 747 for the public to view. The runway was not long enough for he 747 so on the day it had to return they put in just enough fuel to make it back to JFK in NYC. Many of us were there watching and the taxied it as far to the end of the runwas as possible and rotated 180 degrees. When the brake in full they revved up all four big bypass engines and held the brakes. It rattled and shook and it actually looked nervous. But when they released the brakes it started to rol, ever so slowly. It must have run 3/4 of the length of the runway before it rotated and it just about cleared the fence at the end. Pretty exciting for the time. I've also seen the first of the 777's fly in. And finally they had their final air show and many, many WWII aircraft flew in. Then they closed the airstrip and built the UCONN football stadium on the grounds.
Also, for anyone close enough, the Warbird Museum in Genesseo, NY (south of Rochester) has an annual show and the last time I attended they seemed to have literally everything. And everything flew as well and allowing visitors to climb in and through most of the craft.
Finally, years ago the Russian Antonov AN-225 landed at our airport (BDL) and was open to the public. They make the C-5 look like a shuttle.
http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x66/MaestroAlbum/Aircraft%20EHSB/20080129_016aAntonovAN-124.jpg
So enjoy everyone. There aren't many relics left. Nor that many of us either.
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On 8/31/2016 9:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@worthless.info wrote:

It's been a while, but I've seen many old planes fly over. A long time ago I actually got to see some up close and personal at an airshow, too. It would have a lot more fun that day if it hadn't been 100° in the shade!
--
Maggie

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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 22:34:12 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@worthless.info wrote:

When I was a kid they brought a B-36B into Bolling Field in DC for Army-Navy day.. They had to lay that steel mat with the 3 holes in it all the way from the end of the Bolling runway to the Navy Air Station runway and link the 2 together to get the length they needed. It was still exciting watching them take off because he had to do a similar type run up before they started rolling (6 props roaring). A "D" model (4 additional jets) would have been easier to get out of there but they never brought a B36 back.
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On Wednesday, August 31, 2016 at 10:34:17 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@worthless.info wrote:

Joe Sutter, the engineer who headed the 747 development, and who is regarded as the father of the jumbo jet, passed away a few days ago. He was 95 and still working for Boeing doing customer relations, PR work. He helped design and worked on the 707, 727, 737 too.
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