OT: Bewildering auto insurance rates

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wrote:

As usual have nothing to do with the original assertion that these are GPS monitors that can do more than track total miles and speed parameters.
Your original "statement" that trader was responding to was this:

You wouldn't know a true fact if is bit you on your virtual ass.

And yet your own response negates what you said.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

What the insurance companies claim these OBD dongles do, and what they can really do, are 2 different questions.
There are MANY OBD-2 dongles that currently exist that log vehicle data (brake use, vehicle speed) AND have built-in GPS AND can send that data to monitors via cellular service.
It's only a matter of time (a short matter of time) before insurance companies are up-front about wanting to match that info with gps locations (or admitting they already have it in the dongles they've provided).
Any gadgets they provide that don't connect to your obd port will defacto be GPS trackers, but in looking at what's available now, it's clear that:
1) An OBD dongle has sufficient GPS reception capability given the location of these ports in passenger vehicles and the capabilities of GPS receiver modules
2) The OBD dongle is much less likely to be "messed with" in terms of breakage or loss or mishandling by the vehicle's owner/operator compared to a dash-mounted box with cord going to power socket.
3) logged OBD data can probably identify vehicle by serial number, so there is no question that the logged data is from a specific vehicle. A dash-mounted GPS logger might or wouldn't have this capability.
It might even be the case in some cars with built-in GPS that it is possible to get GPS data through the OBD port. So insurance companies wouldn't be lying if they said their dongle's were not GPS receivers.

=====================http://www.infowars.com/auto-insurance-co-tracks-drivers-by-gps-charges-per-mile-driven/
Auto Insurance Co. Tracks Drivers by GPS & Charges Per Mile Driven
Insurance tracking device records route driven by the policyholder
Kit Daniels Infowars.com March 28, 2014
A California auto insurance company is rolling out a car tracking device which allows the company to locate policyholders by GPS and charge them insurance rates per mile driven.
Developed by San Francisco-based MetroMile, the Metronome device plugs into a vehicle’s OBD-II port and wirelessly sends mileage data to the insurance company, which charges a base rate plus 2 to 5 cents per mile, and can even record the route driven by the policyholder.
MetroMile also provides a smartphone app which links the policyholder’s phone to the device.
“Opening the app, it showed the path I had driven and recorded the number of miles, how long it took, average fuel economy and fuel cost,” Cnet contributor Wayne Cunningham wrote in his review of the Metronome. “After driving further, I opened the app again and saw the route I covered on a map.”
“The app listed each trip I took, breaking it up at each of my stops.”
He also added that he could view his entire route for a specific day or for each individual driving segment.
Now this isn’t the first monitoring device released by an auto insurance company but it is one of the first to openly employ GPS data to charge drivers per mile driven.
California’s former Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner green-lighted per-mile insurance pricing back in 2009 in order to pressure drivers not to drive as much, and no doubt insurance companies will take advantage of the pricing to hike up auto insurance rates just as Obamacare did for health insurance.
Rural drivers in particular will be especially hurt as many of them drive long stretches of highway to get to the nearest city.
And there’s also the very real risk of insurance companies abusing captured GPS data by charging policyholders fees for going, say, one mile over the speed limit or for driving at night.
Or, even worse, the data could be handed over to the government.
“The best way to protect a consumer’s locational privacy is to not collect the data in the first place,” privacy watchdogs Privacy Rights Clearinghouse and PrivacyActivism wrote on the subject. “… Because insurers may collect all manner of data, all of that data will be stored along with the actual miles data.”
“Data retention issues arise because now not only are we looking at the storage of actual miles data, but of all other data that happens to be collected.”
Unfortunately, auto insurance companies are simply following a trend set by authoritarian lawmakers who are trying to tax drivers per mile driven with government-mandated tracking devices. ================ See also:
http://www.ebay.com/bhp/obd-gps-tracker
OBD II GPS Tracker Real Time GPS tracking System GPS Tracker for car, NO hidden FEES, No contract
$89.99
Simple GPS tracking provides real time GPS tracking system updates every one minute while device is in motion. Its perfect for monitoring your fleet, home vehicles, senior citizens or teens.
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I sent the nearest State Farm agent a letter with info requesting a quote and a follow up email a week later through his web site. He didn't respond to either. Other agents answered the same letter text with quotes so that wasn't it.
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Of those I tried, Geico came in fourth. AARP/Hartford, Central Insurance Companies, and Nationwide were lower. State Farm didn't respond.
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"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






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On 03/30/2014 10:57 AM, KenK wrote:

I'm pretty sure I mentioned here the horrible experience I had with State Farm when I tried to get house insurance.
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On 3/30/2014 2:22 PM, philo wrote:

I had car and house insurance with State Farm but dropped the house insurance over their being a PITA over a small claim. Still find them good with car insurance.
Insurance rates are set by the state you live in and vary widely from state to state.
I have a son that is an insurance company lawyer. They don't make the obscene profits that people think they do. Their biggest obstacle is our government.
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wrote:

Only when in your fevered imagination or (most often) when you get called out on some idiocy and want to pretend you are still correct.
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KenK wrote:

If you can get in with USAA do so. Nothing else comes close.
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