OT: beef

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wrote:

Huh?
Publix has ribeye on sale around here about half the time for $5.99-6.99 bone in or $6.99-7.99 boneless. It may regularly be close to $10 but wait a week. Sams/Costco sells the cryopack ribeyes for about $6-7 a pound boneless. The problem there is you don't get much of a look at what you are buying. Some is good, some is dog food.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Of course, Publix's "ribeyes" include considerably more than just the eye. Same is true of just about everybody though.
Then there is prime rib. One would think you were getting a rib cut from prime meat, no? No, probably. "Prime rib" can also/used to mean the back three ribs; they are closest to the loin (also the smallest) and were/are considered "prime".
Thus one *could* have prime prime rib. Not likely though; not likely you'd get USDA prime rib either because the phrase has become synonomous with any cut or grade of rib because of consumer ignorance.
I won't even mention the nefarious practice of selling a thick cut of top round as "chateaubriand" :(
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Yes, food and gasoline are still very cheap here. Water (in bottles) isn't. ;-)
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dadiOH wrote:

Hi, We as a family don't eat beef much. Just occasional BBQ or steak specially in summer. We get what we need from an organic farm near our cabin. We phone ahead if we need some and it's ready for pick up when we go out there. Research proved there is quite a difference in nutritional value between feed lot grown beef and naturally grazing beef. Same with battery chickens(eggs) literally lacks essential nutrition. Any farms near your place?
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Lots. Mostly citrus, some berry. Lots of cattle but it goes I know not where.
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dadiOH
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FWIW, I asked a deer processor if he would do hog or beef if I brought it to him. He said no, too many government regulations. Evidently wild meat doesn't matter. I asked what about wild hogs. He said the govt considers them 'feral', not wild. Political correctness at work.
Red
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wrote:

Up here in Waterloo County, Ontario Canada, there are plenty of custom butchers, and a very large store - Central Fresh Market - that does virtually all their meet cutting inhouse. All the Zahrs stores (loblaws) also have qualified and experienced meet cutters on site.

I like grass-fed beef - a bit stronger tasting, not as well marbled as corn fed - but healthier. There is no dangerous e-coli in the gut of grass-fed cattle.

Up here we have a lot of general farms, a lot of Dairy farms, and beef farms, as well as too many "holdout" hog farmers who still believe the price of pork will go up high enough, long enough, for them to make back their losses in their lifetime. Ain't NEVER going to happen.
Quite a few of the Mennonite farmers in the area have put up greenhouses and gone into organic produce. The St Jacobs Farmer's market is a destination not to miss if you head up this direction during the growing season.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You might want to read this article in Slate: http://tinyurl.com/28muldw
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 17:44:30 -0500, Dean Hoffman

E-Coli aside. grass-fed beef is STILL healthier - and the whole e-coli thing has not been totally proven one way or the other. Eating either grain or grass-fed beef raw is a BAD idea.
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wrote:

Grain is what food eats. That's just one reason why humans shouldn't eat grains.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Another important side is the meat processor. Unless they adhere to the clean-up regs, etc., one of the major ways for e-coli spread is the equipment they use to prepare the beef for market. Of course all of this would pretty much be a sidepoint if we would just irradiate the stuff just before packing.
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and name it after the IRS.
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another contributing factor is our clean life. if all food were contaminated its likely we wouldnt get ill.
just like go to guatemala drink some water, you will probably get very ill.
while the native residents drink that water daily and arent bothered by it
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Where's the beef!!
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wrote:

Good find! I knew I had heard/read somewhere that grass or grain fed, the gut of the cow itself is the perfect incubator no matter what.
Considering how long it takes to trace a killer food-borne epidemic to its source, it's easy to imagine a mutated lethal strain getting into society and doing a lot of damage before they figure out "whodunit." The "bad" E. coli does its deadly job by filling your gut with toxic byproducts of its life-cycle.
Here's something for you punsters "E. coli colonizes the colon." When it's good, it's very helpful, but a mutated strain can be very lethal and the cows that have it may show no signs of distress whatever. Or they could be downers, soaked in diarrhea but they sneak into the food chain anyway. McD's is using a new ammonia scrubbing process to sterilize their "began as beef" product.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/31/us/31meat.html
but many people complain that it leaves a distinctive and unpleasant aroma even if it does kill the bad E. coli (reports vary). The sad truth is that we will eventually have to irradiate all our food because it's going to turn out to be impossible for us to close the last little gap.
Cows and chickens aren't quite as fastidious as cats and will pretty much always be contaminated by fecal coliform bacteria. Not that I am a fan of irradiated food, I just don't see any other solution. At least not without an army of federal inspectors forcing unsustainable levels of cleanliness on barnyard creatures who could not care at all what the FDA says about where they should poop and how.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

The "bad" E. coli has a disadvantage over the good E coli. It doesn't grow as fast. However, the bad grows better than the good in the presence of a) overcrowding, and b) antibiotics. I have nothing to quote other than my faulty memory, and no solutions either. My spouse buys steak as it is on sale at the local Shoprite. We freeze it (helps to tenderize), then I char it a bit with some flavorings on top, then consume it as "rare" steak. Yummy. So far, so good. My European visitors have complimened me on the meat I cook.
--
Best regards
Han
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Han wrote: bby G.

Every beef recall I've heard of involves ground beef. Supposedly, the E. coli bacteria gets mixed throughout the beef during the grinding process. It has to be cooked thoroughly to kill the E.Coli. The mixing doesn't happen with things like steak. The bacteria stays on the surface and is easily killed during cooking.
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On Mon, 14 Jun 2010 13:47:41 -0500, Dean Hoffman

Part of the problem is the SOURCE of the ground beef. A lot of it is trimmings and "drops" that have a lot more surface per lb to pick up contamination - and it is not as carefully handled. "drops" is often doubly descriptive.
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E coli conrtamination of meat does not happen inside the cow. It happens in the processing. Somehow they manage to get shit on the meat. It is usually just a sanitation problem.
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Find a different store with a real butcher, what you are seeing is big business contracting cheaper.
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