OT: automotive electrical connector loose, power window

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wrote:

break. A few screws hidden in handles etc too.
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wrote:

just soldered the wires to the switch.
You might try just tinning the switch pins to make them a bit bigger - might do the job. If not, the solder job is already half done.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned using conductive epoxy to remedy "loose disconnections" like the one you are describing. It's saved my ass a few times and I've kept the unused epoxy in the kitchen freezer for several years and it still works fine when needed.
Conductive epoxy would likely fix your problem and you'll probably trade in the car before the switch itself fails. It wouldn't hurt to scrape out the female contacts a bit before using the epoxy in case they are "dirty".
See this:
http://tinyurl.com/htxncax
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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On Friday, September 30, 2016 at 4:56:23 PM UTC-4, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

with a known good switch I finally found the real problem: the connector doesn't stay on the pins tightly. Slight finger pressure will make good co ntact and the window works fine, but otherwise not. It's a 1991 Volvo if t hat makes any difference.

ch. I'd swap with one of the other three, but the four switch connectors a re all shaped uniquely and can't be repositioned.

rtical finger pressure downward operates the window. Press down on the bac k of the switch (it's a rocker) and the window goes down; press on the fron t of the switch and it goes up.

wiring harness has 7 connectors. If I pull the entire switch assembly out of the door panel, and press lightly upwards on the bottom of the connecto r, the switch will work.

the switch and clean corrosion and said this was a known failure mode for t hat car. And it did seem to work. This year I cleaned the switch contacts AND swapped it for a known good switch, and the symptom remains. Pressure on the connector makes it work. The "bad" switch works fine in the new lo cation.

this will be a pain in the butt to work on, it's a large wiring harness bu ried deep in the door panel with almost no slack.

I wouldn't mind a little dirty female contact.
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On 09/22/2016 07:57 AM, TimR wrote:

The car's 25 years old. I think I'd just cut the plug off the harness and direct solder wires to switch.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 11:59:46 AM UTC-4, Buck wrote:

h a known good switch I finally found the real problem: the connector does n't stay on the pins tightly. Slight finger pressure will make good contac t and the window works fine, but otherwise not. It's a 1991 Volvo if that makes any difference.

I'd swap with one of the other three, but the four switch connectors are a ll shaped uniquely and can't be repositioned.

That's not a bad suggestion, although he did say:
"it's a large wiring harness buried deep in the door panel with almost no slack."
If the connector just reaches the switch now, the wires won't once the connector is cut off - unless the individual wires are either pulled out of the harness and re-routed (might work, might not) or "extensions" are soldered on first.
Of course, the switch itself also has to be amenable to having wires soldered on to it. Access to the connection points, room for the wires, etc.
Like I said, the suggestion has merit but the implementation may be troublesome.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 12:55:25 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

This could be done. There are only 4 wires. They are short but could be s pliced.
The switch though has 4 male pins that are in a recessed cavity. It would not be simple to solder directly to them. I think I would have to crimp fe male terminals on the end of the wires, and maybe even solder those to the pins to avoid them vibrating off.
I've found some good videos by googling "repin terminal." There are tricks for getting these out, some of which might work.
But first I'm going to try shimming the connector in place and see if that helps. Maybe something as simple as a rubber band will get a couple more y ears out of it.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 1:19:49 PM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

female terminals on the end of the wires, and maybe even solder those to th e pins to avoid them vibrating off.

years out of it.
A zip-tie would probably last forever. I'm sure that with some creative zip-tieing, perhaps with multiple zip-ties and/or a strategically drilled hole to run the zip-tie through, you could secure the connector in the correct position.
I solved a "self acceleration" issue in my daughter's Taurus with a single zip-tie. The cable housing at the throttle body end of the cruise control cable is known to crack, causing the cable to fall out of the mounting bracket, introducing slack. Once that happens, the cruise control doesn't work and the vehicle's idle slowly increases. You don't really notice it unless you take your foot off the gas while traveling under 20 mph and just coast. You suddenly realize that you don't slow down and in fact that you are slowly gaining speed. One zip-tie near the end of the CC cable prevents it from falling out of the bracket. It's been >60K miles since I added the zip-tie and the problem has never returned.
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TimR posted for all of us...

I would not use a rubber band, it will self destruct quickly. I don't know if anyone suggested this but maybe a drop of solder in the correct place may make an interference fit. If it's too big it can be filed down.
--
Tekkie

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On Thu, 22 Sep 2016 09:55:21 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

panel really SHOULD come off to do the repair, either way.
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