OT: automotive electrical connector loose, power window

Page 2 of 3  
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 11:29:58 AM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

ot work reliably, although it did occasionally.

so I'm pretty sure I finally know the real diagnosis.


when the connector is pushed on. The mechanic had trouble getting the tur n signals to function after the headlight replacement and he showed me. He ended up pushing the pins forward out of the connector and connecting it m anually, then adding the connector block next. I didn't know pins would co me out forward, but he said on old worn cars it isn't uncommon for these to be loose. There's a special half moon tool for depressing the tab and get ting them out backwards for replacement.

re fine, but they're loose in the block, because the block itself is worn ( or maybe even damaged by overheating.) I think new pins will just slide ba ck in the block, failing to make contact, like the old ones do.

ne of the switches that works. I can't switch the connectors because all f our are unique, but I could cut the wires to two switches and swap them.
So, if I understand that correctly, you want to (for example) have the rear passenger switch control the front driver's window, but still be in th e rear passenger position of the switch block.
Do you know if that will pass inspection? That's what started this whole discussion, right?
You take the car for inspection and the tech tries the driver's window switch. Nothing happens, so he fails the vehicle. He comes out, you tell him to try the rear passenger window switch - or maybe you tell him before hand. Do you know if that will fly?
Maybe you want to ask before you go through the trouble?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...
<snip>

In Texas the only thing the side windows are checked for is too dark window tent, however if they can't get the window down in order to check the tent I suppose that might be cause for failure.
--
RonNNN

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 1:29:32 PM UTC-4, RonNNN wrote:

Why do Texans set up tents inside their vehicles?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

The bad guys don't want the cops to see inside their vehicle when they get stopped, the good guys want to keep the Texas heat out.
--
RonNNN

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 1:36:02 PM UTC-4, RonNNN wrote:

Whoosh!
(Hint: Check your spelling)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

You got me! LOL!
--
RonNNN

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

different!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

No shit Sherlock! Derby already pointed out my incorrect spelling. BTW, speel chunkers dusn't no it wuz speeled rong.
--
RonNNN

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyDad03 presented the following explanation :

So they can canvas the neighborhood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 12:37:22 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

None of the switches are marked. How would he know which is which? Maybe Volvo made them that way in 1991.
Anyway, it's a thought, if the car is still running next year. I've passed this year, had it working long enough to make it through.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 3:17:51 PM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

Well, if I got into a vehicle with a window switch bank that was unmarked, I'd take a wild ass guess and try the front left for the driver's window, the front right for the front passenger window, etc.
I don't recall ever being in a vehicle where the windows were randomly assigned to the switches, but maybe that's just me.

Good for you!
Just curious: How inconvenient is it to not have a working window? I know I use mine quite often.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 3 Oct 2016 09:37:17 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Do it once. Do it right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/03/2016 4:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

Right! Trade the vehicle and be done with it...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 12:37:22 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

not work reliably, although it did occasionally.

k so I'm pretty sure I finally know the real diagnosis.

e.

ck when the connector is pushed on. The mechanic had trouble getting the t urn signals to function after the headlight replacement and he showed me. He ended up pushing the pins forward out of the connector and connecting it manually, then adding the connector block next. I didn't know pins would come out forward, but he said on old worn cars it isn't uncommon for these to be loose. There's a special half moon tool for depressing the tab and g etting them out backwards for replacement.

are fine, but they're loose in the block, because the block itself is worn (or maybe even damaged by overheating.) I think new pins will just slide back in the block, failing to make contact, like the old ones do.

one of the switches that works. I can't switch the connectors because all four are unique, but I could cut the wires to two switches and swap them.

IDK where Tim is located, but here, in the Peoples Republic of NJ, they never cared about window switches to pass inspection, even back in the day when they cared about things like windshield wipers and headlight aiming. Now they just connect to the OBD to check for pollution monitors. I don't think they even check brakes anymore.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 5:53:12 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

id not work reliably, although it did occasionally.

ock so I'm pretty sure I finally know the real diagnosis.

ale.

back when the connector is pushed on. The mechanic had trouble getting the turn signals to function after the headlight replacement and he showed me. He ended up pushing the pins forward out of the connector and connecting it manually, then adding the connector block next. I didn't know pins woul d come out forward, but he said on old worn cars it isn't uncommon for thes e to be loose. There's a special half moon tool for depressing the tab and getting them out backwards for replacement.

ns are fine, but they're loose in the block, because the block itself is wo rn (or maybe even damaged by overheating.) I think new pins will just slid e back in the block, failing to make contact, like the old ones do.

to one of the switches that works. I can't switch the connectors because a ll four are unique, but I could cut the wires to two switches and swap them .

No, in Virginia you must have an operable driver's window, though none of t he others have to work.
I use it every morning when I pass the security guard at work and have to s how my ID.
I did enough messing with it that lifting the switch assembly with my index finger is making contact. I know that's temporary; I've spotted another V olvo at the local recycle yard and hope to get a switch off that this weeke nd.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

block. It is the spring tension of the connectors on the pins. The connectors MUST be loose in the block to allow them to move and align to the pins. You need to understand how those connections work. I do. Which is why I have been giving you accurate advice on how to fix the problem. Either replace the connections ot solder them.. Go to an auto wreckers - there is sure to be a "pick-a-part" type place near you - and getr the connectors from the latest model vehicle you can find that uses the same switch. That will take a bit of research - but Google is your friend on that count. Take the plugs, with as much wire as you can get (6 inches or more) then cut the old plug off and solder the new one on. Get the switch too, for good measure -.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TimR explained on 9/22/2016 :

Still no photo to go by, but just from your description it sounds like the female ends of the connectors are loose.
Usually, the individual sleeves or pins can be extracted from the connector block and be made to fit tighter and then reinserted back into the block. You may have to fashion an extraction tool to depress the barb which holds the female connector in the block.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 10:36:05 AM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

with a known good switch I finally found the real problem: the connector doesn't stay on the pins tightly. Slight finger pressure will make good co ntact and the window works fine, but otherwise not. It's a 1991 Volvo if t hat makes any difference.

ch. I'd swap with one of the other three, but the four switch connectors a re all shaped uniquely and can't be repositioned.

cal finger pressure downward operates the window. Press down on the back o f the switch (it's a rocker) and the window goes down; press on the front o f the switch and it goes up.

ring harness has 7 connectors. If I pull the entire switch assembly out of the door panel, and press lightly upwards on the bottom of the connector, the switch will work.

switch and clean corrosion and said this was a known failure mode for that car. And it did seem to work. This year I cleaned the switch contacts AN D swapped it for a known good switch, and the symptom remains. Pressure on the connector makes it work. The "bad" switch works fine in the new locat ion.

is will be a pain in the butt to work on, it's a large wiring harness burie d deep in the door panel with almost no slack.
If you need to take the door panel off, they typically aren't hard to do. Like many things, the internet has been a big help. Check youtube for videos on how to do it for your car. The big thing is knowing where the screws are that you need to remove.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 11:05:13 AM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

Absolutely true, I've done it a number of times.
However, putting them back on is often a different matter, as the little clips have rusted or decayed and always break. So I'll do it if I have to but it's a last resort.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 11:28:56 AM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

Auto supply stores often have those little clips. Or the dealer will have them. I've put them back on with a few missing and they fit OK too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.