OT, Another WTF Moment

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Me and JH went on a service call today at a women's clothing store to repair a point of sale cash register. After I finisher swapping out the whole chassis and hard drive in the NCR register, I was in the back of the store waiting on JH to call dispatch and close out the service ticket when I saw on the wall something that caused the "WTF". It was a shrinkage report for the store, a report about the cost of lost or stolen merchandise. For the year 2012 it was $38,675.00 and 3.08% of store revenues. I suppose that was considered a good year, WTF! O_o
TDD
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On Thursday, August 1, 2013 8:31:07 PM UTC-7, The Daring Dufas wrote:

That’s a good example of the disadvantages of a big company. The bigger they are the harder it is to control who is stealing what. The next time someone complains about those big box stores putting the small stores out of business remind them of this.
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The once or twice I've been in womens clothing stores for repairs, they have made effort to count the number of items that go in to the fitting rooms. Still, they appear to lose a lot of items due to theft. That's a real shame, that peoples morality is going down hill like that.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/1/2013 11:31 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

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On Friday, August 2, 2013 7:36:40 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Shoplifting has been going on as long as there have been shops.
In fact it's probably not as prevalent now as it has been in the past because of surveillance and electronic security devices.
The key is not spending more on security than you lose in theft. If you spend $50,000 a year to prevent the loss of $38,000 of product, you may as well let them take the stuff.
You can take the moral indignation high road but sometimes the moral indignation high road leads to bankruptcy.
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On 8/2/2013 3:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Before I retired, the company was employing more and more contract workers at the lab site I was at. Real PITA. Even though they increased security, theft losses doubled. Night janitors were a real problem and even though they had to walk through the gate and open their lunch boxes, stuff disappeared. I'm told of spotting tracks in the snow on either side of the fence where stuff was tossed over. I was waiting for a lock to be put on a lab balance (also contractors) and forgot to lock it up and it was stolen. Cost me a half day with the paperwork and investigation. Contract electricians, millwrights and painters caused me lots of grief but I guess the company thought it was worth it.
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On 8/2/2013 6:08 PM, Frank wrote:

I've had problems with guys who worked for me even after I told them "Don't take anything without permission from someone in charge. Don't even take a dirty snot rag unless someone gives you permission." I had a guy working for me who knocked out communications for a hamburger chain by taking a souvenir which was a wall wort power supply for a modem. I told the guy not to take any of the abandon phone equipment in a telephone room without permission. My admonition was in front of an employee of the company I was doing work for. The moron couldn't help it, he just had to take something and he was a former convict I was trying to help. I learned my lesson after I lost that account. No more convicts, no more alcoholics and no more pot heads. I won't even hire a smoker because they're addicted to a very powerful albeit legal drug. Besides I'm very allergic to the smoke as are many employees of my customers. ^_^
TDD
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On Friday, August 2, 2013 4:56:36 PM UTC-7, The Daring Dufas wrote:

[...snip....]

ees of my

Got a call the other day out of the blue from a friend I had worked with i n the non-smokers' rights movement -- must be at least 2 decades ago. What we had to go through, between the all-powerful tobacco lobby and the freak ing politicians who were too scared or too venal to vote in the public inte rest!!!
People today who can breathe freely in restaurants, movies, stores, etc. do n't realize what it was like back then -- threats, insults, sometimes physi cal violence.
There are STILL problems we hear about all the time from apartment dwellers who are suffering like hell from smoke drifting into their space from anot her unit or from a balcony. The smokers are indignant that they can't do w hat they like in their own space. The victims -- perhaps with a medical co ndition that could be life-threatening if they inhale smoke -- are equally indignant that they have to live with windows closed in all weather, can't go out on their porches/balconies, and even so, smoke finds its way into t heir space.
Some newer construction is dedicated smoke-free, but that doesn't help peop le stuck in an unbearable situation in older housing.
How would Solomon render judgment?
HB
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On 08-02-2013 21:03, Higgs Boson wrote:

I've never smoked, and I HATE the smell. Nevertheless, I believe government meddles far too much and usually in the wrong places.
Here, we mandated that all restaurants have the smoking section walled off with separate ventilation. I figure the owner should have the right to do what he wants with his property and I have the right to choose whether to enter.
A lot of restaurants chose to close rather than remodel. And after the rest had spent all that money in compliance, the same council outlawed smoking completely in restaurants.
I have far less "freedom of choice" on whether or not to enter a hospital. But the council didn't see any reason to address smoking there.
--
Wes Groleau

Curmudgeon's Complaints on Courtesy:
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On F

loyees of my

What we had to go through, between the all-powerful tobacco lobby and the f reaking politicians who were too scared or too venal to vote in the public interest!!!

hysical violence.

another unit or from a balcony. The smokers are indignant that they can't do what they like in their own space. The victims -- perhaps with a medica l condition that could be life-threatening if they inhale smoke -- are equa lly indignant that they have to live with windows closed in all weather, ca n't go out on their porches/balconies, and even so, smoke finds its way in to their space.

****Where is "here"? Which state or locality?
Different states approached this problem with varying ardor.
For a while, restaurants tried "smoking sections", but very few spent the m oney to provide separate ventilation. Mostly it was a band-aid that did ab solutely nothing to keep smoke away from non-smokers' the smoke didn't know it was not supposed to attack them.

he/she wants is a fallacious one. Restaurants serve a public good. They a re regulated as to the food they serve, as to toilet facilities, as to fire alarms/exits even as to parking in some localities.
There have been many tragic cases of people burned to death because of inad equate or inoperative fire systems OR EVEN LOCKED EXITS!
Same with bad food served to YOU and YOUR family, who got sick and maybe di ed.
It took DECADES to overcome the enormous amounts of money poured into this situation by the tobacco lobby. *You should educate yourself on how viciou s and dishonest was the propaganda they put out*. And how openly they paid off national and local legi$lator$ to fight non-smokers' rights movements.
Please rethink your inaccurate comparison to restaurant access with hospita l access. (You do, in fact, have the right to refuse to enter a hospital - - if you are conscious and weird enough to want to make that choice.)
But if you cannot enter a restaurant without suffering from tobacco smoke, where is your choice?
HB
[...]
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On 08-03-2013 18:16, Higgs Boson wrote:

It is very easy to choose another restaurant. There were a lot of them that didn't get my business because of their poor choices regarding smoking. And I could choose to visit _none_ of them without endangering my health in the least.
It is considerably more difficult to refuse medical treatment if one needs it.
The inaccuracy is in pretending the two choices are equal.
If they had chosen to ban smoking in health care facilities instead of restaurants, I doubt any hospitals would have chosen to shut down and put ___ people out of work.
If they had chosen to ban smoking instead of mandating expensive remodeling, there would also have been less adverse effect on our economy. But I still would have opposed it.
You were correct about the poorly designed smoking sections. A non-smoking section is stupid when one has to walk through the smoking section to get to it. I never went to such a place the second time. Sometimes I told them why. Sometimes I didn't.
Someone said the law was to protect the health of the wait staff. Nonsense. The law said nothing about withholding service from the smokers in the special room.
Do you think I should lobby to forbid grocery stores from having the aisles of detergents than bun my nostrils when I get near them?
How about the lack of a law banning perfume from department stores? Is that unjust to my friend who has to stay out to avoid a medical emergency?
By the way, both of our hospitals decided to ban smoking without government interference. The one nearest me even claims to not allow tobacco products of any sort anywhere on their property. But they don't make any effort to enforce it outside the building and away from the entrance. (We actually have five hospitals, but only two companies run them.)
--
Wes Groleau

Pat's Polemics
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wrote:

At the Hoover washing machine manufacturing plant. (Merthyr Tydfil) Washing machines were disappearing but how?
Went on for years. It finally trnspired that the guys who loaded the trucks figuered out how to pack in two extra machines in every truck.
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I used to work with a HVAC maintenance guy who wore one of those blue denim shop jackets with big pockets, every day, rain or shine, hot or cold. His reason:
On the days he wanted to take small items from the "open parts bins" (nuts, bolts, etc.) it wouldn't look weird if he suddenly wore a jacket. If he wore the jacket everyday, no one would suspect him of stealing like they would if he showed up wearing it on a random 90 degree day.
Think about that. He wasn't planning on stealing stuff everyday, but he was dressing so that he could do so whenever he wanted to without raising suspicion. What a strange way to go through life.
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On 8/2/2013 10:42 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

There is an old story most likely apocryphal about a factory worker who rolled a wheelbarrow filled with sand out the gate every day he worked at the factory. The guard always stopped him and dug through the sand slinging the sand every where but never found anything hidden in the sand. On the factory workers last day on the job, he exited the gate without his customary wheelbarrow. Upon seeing this, the guard stopped him and said, "I know you were stealing something all these years, so tell me before I go nuts." The factory worker answered, "wheelbarrows". ^_^
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On 8/3/2013 12:35 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Thread reminds me of random checks we would go through being stopped at the gate and guard having us pop our car trunk so he could inspect it.
On guy put a Playboy fold out in his trunk so when it popped it would unfold in front of the guard. He got one too but guard acted like nothing happened.
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On Sat, 03 Aug 2013 07:39:12 -0400, Frank

Random probably let's a lot get through. I worked at IH for years and every day carried out my coveralls for washing. Dirty job. My wife would wash them all in the wringer machine once a week. So I ended up with 5 sets when I quit. Those were damn good coveralls, and cost about 50 bucks today. I used them for many years after. Didn't think about that then, and they didn't either. Pretty much how I'd come home from office work with a company pen or marker in my pocket and they'd pile up until I made it a habit to leave them at work.
Anyway, I carried the coveralls in, and out in a shopping bag with my other dirty clothes, as I always showered and put on my clean clothes from my locker before walking out. The gate guard would always ask me to hold the bag up and open so he could see inside. Never hefted it, but it was just a cheap paper shopping bag, so it couldn't hold anything heavy, and he could see it wasn't lined with canvas. I noticed the guards would randomly open the metal lunchboxes some guys carried. I always brown-bagged. One day somebody says, "You hear about Joe? Guard caught him with a load of copper in his lunchbox. Fired."
This Joe guy was a pretty highly paid machinist. Had about 20 years in, and IH had a sweet retirement program. I remember thinking WTF? How can anybody be so stupid? I don't understand the thief mentality on several levels. Though copper was pretty cheap then, I guess it was easy to sell. Or maybe Joe's hobby was copper working. Don't know. Thing is, the risk/reward was all out of whack.
OTOH, I'm not saying I'm perfect either. Did some of my own thieving when I was a machine mechanic. Took about 10 each of maybe 3 small sizes of nuts/bolts. 1/4, 5/16, 3/8. A few different lengths, along with flat and lock washers for them. Put them in my parts arsenal and they came in handy over the years. Wasn't the money, as that wasn't a hill of beans. Just the convenience. Still stealing when you get down to it.
The biggest difference is there was absolutely no risk for me. It's pretty common for people to steal from the workplace if the workplace accepts it, or just doesn't police it. I also copped a staple remover, hole punch, and some manilla folders from my office jobs. Again, no risk. Some might call it a job "benefit." But I'll just admit to thievery in my past. Doesn't bother me much, but a spade is a spade.
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On 8/3/2013 12:53 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

I've told guys working for me to just ask. That way I'll know what I need to replace. If it's not an expensive item and the guy asks for some hardware, no problem as long as it's not a 50lb box. ^_^
TDD
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I'd guess that much of what they'd ask, you planned to get a new one already, and it's all good.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/3/2013 2:04 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

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On Sat, 03 Aug 2013 12:53:52 -0500, Vic Smith

Companies like it when stories like that get around. Discourages others from taking the risk.

Many of us have done things like that. I have some brass, SS, and aluminum nuts and bolts too. Damned handy.
Where I worked we had many fasteners as well as copper fittings. Some of the fittings were in bins and the little used ones became dull as they sat for a long time. We'd take two fitting, clean them up and lay them in the bin of oxidized parts. Next day the tow shiny ones were gone but the 200 old ones were untouched.

Maybe I'm getting even now. This past year I took a Dremel tool and shop vac to work for shop use. They were in the way at home.
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Most the time that's true, but not always. I used to chat with a girl at my first IT job. She was an accountant. Then I noticed she was missing. Asked a senior manager I was friendly with where she went. He hesitated, but he trusted me. Told me she had embezzled $30k. Lot of money then. 1980. Also said to keep it to myself, which I have until now. Said they didn't recover the money, and didn't prosecute her either. Bad for company image. So ole Joe loses his job and retirement for stealing a couple pounds of copper, and maybe gets a misdemeanor theft conviction so he can't contest anything. I don't recall if he got charged though. This gal walks away with $30k. But hey, nobody ever said life is "fair."
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Vic Smith wrote:

Embezzlers rarely get prosecuted, unless the amount is outrageous and cannot be kept secret by their employers.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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