OT: Another quiz

The following were taken from a 5th grade textbook published in 1909:
* How many pounds of sugar, at $0.06 a pound, can be exchanged for 9 pounds of butter at $0.32 a pound, and 12 dozen eggs at $0.18 a dozen?
* A lady sold some butter at $0.32 a pound and with the sum received bought 16 yards of cloth at $0.90 a yard, 4 hats at $3.00 each, 4 ties at $0.24 each, and 4 pairs of gloves at $0.55 each. How many pounds of butter did she sell?
* $65 is the value of 5/6ths of an acre of land. At this rate, how many acres of land can be bought for $6396?
* How many pecks are there in 17.5 bushels?
* A market gardener bought 20 yards of carpet at $1.25 a yard and paid for it in potatoes at $0.05 a quart. How many bushels were required.
Contrast the above with today's typical 5th grade test:
* How much is 2 plus 2 (Hint: the answer is not a color)?
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That seems a LITTLE bit advanced for 5th graders in the Chicago suburban area.
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My daughter was doing Algebra in the 5th grade that I didnt see until I was High School. I think that was pretty common. However I don't think she has ever had to do a reading problem.
Jimmie
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On Sun, 19 Feb 2012 03:24:43 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE
-snip-

Probably not in TX. Seems like most of the folks who think kids today are dumber than dirt are from TX.
I wish some youngsters from TX would weigh in so we could see if it is true down there or if it is just the old farts over-compensating.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

In my view, neither one.
Texas ranks very low in high school completion and other measures of academic excellence. This unfortunate situation is probably because a significant number of school-age children are from aliens' families.
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On 2/19/2012 6:35 PM, HeyBub wrote:

It could be that the schools spend too much time trying to teach English or the classes have to held in a foreign language? o_O
TDD
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On 2/19/2012 7:33 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

BINGO! no more calls, we have a winnner!
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
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<Irony ON> It's the teacher's fault, obviously... <Irony OFF>
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wrote:

Looks about like wht my kids were doing then.
Jimmie
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wrote:

In fifth grade I was learning simple arithmetic in bases up to 32 (sixth grade was more of the same but added more complex arithmetic like long division). Of course I didn't use it again until college (but have pretty much every day since).
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Robert Green wrote:

It's called hyperbole, that is, exaggeration for the purpose of emphasis. Regrettably, you did not learn that in your high school English class.

Er, no. The definition of "peckerhead" does not include doing "inexplicable things." Regrettably, you did not learn to use a dictionary in the 9th grade.

[snip syllabus]
Could well be true, and I thank you for the list. Regrettably, in Chicago very many students do not REACH the fifth grade inasmuch as they turn 17 and can quit school altogether.
I thank you, nevertheless, for your contribution to this thread.
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