OT: America, still the Home of the Brave

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True enough. There were two miracles that day. One, that he wasn't killed in the attempt. I believe him when he says he was certain he would die. The other is that he got the MOH and not a court-martial.
-- Bobby G.
*BOBO, JOHN P. Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division (Rein), FMF. Place and date: Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam, 30 March 1967. Born: 14 February 1943, Niagara Falls, N.Y. Citation: When an exploding enemy mortar round severed 2d Lt. Bobo's right leg below the knee, he refused evacuation, insisting upon being placed in a firing position to cover his command group. With his leg jammed into the dirt to curtain the bleeding, he remained and delivered devastating fire into the ranks of the enemy. 2d Lt. Bobo was mortally wounded while firing his weapon into the main point of the enemy attack.
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Easier. That he was awarded the MOH is practically a miracle. -----
- gpsman
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wrote:

Those "incredible restraints" are the direct consequence of global television and the Internet. Every soldier now fights under the watchful eye of CNN and MSNBC and YouTube and al-Jazeera. Any mistake, and they pounce.
And every air crew knows that when they drop bombs, CNN will be there watching the action from the *enemy's* point of view. One missile goes off course and hits a civilian target, and instantly the cameras will show horrific pictures of wailing mothers and maimed children. Broadcast into every American living room.
I wonder if we could have won World War II that way. The Franklin Roosevelt administration had imposed strict censorship on the American news media. Many stories unfavorable to the American war effort never made it for publication.
And no American news station would have dared to show things from the German or Japanese points of view.
-- Steven L.
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<stuff snipped>

Worse than that, news coverage doesn't capture the danger that hovers like a thick fog all the time. If soldiers don't stay "frosty" they end up dead.
Your comments remind me that in more than one instance in the Vietnam war, parents would see their sons dying in agony on the evening news before the DoD contacted them officially. There was a belief that showing the horrors of war on the news would put an end to war. Ha! All it did was lead us to this "if you kill a civilian, you're going to get in a jackpot" craziness.

I am of the opinion such wars should be fought thusly: Broadcast a message by leaflet, radio, loudspeaker, etc. that Tikrit or Kabul or whatever city the bad guys are hiding in will be totally leveled by bunker-buster bombs in 48 hours. Leave or die. Our "advantage" is our ability to obliterate an enemy, biblically. Getting in all these brush wars has eroded, rather than enhanced our position at the end of WWII. A true superpower able to end the fight that someone else started with a quick one-two punch.

Hell, back in those days, the media wouldn't even report he was crippled with polio. Now we know everything there is to know about candidates down to their sex habits. It was a different world. On the positive side, cellphones, Twitter, etc. make it hard for totalitarian regimes to keep a lid on things. I expect China to explode with internal problems in the future. The world has changed and will change even more. I can understand why so many older Americans feel so lost. People are starting to speak a foreign language around them: Ebay, Twitter, tweeting, the cloud, RSS, Usenet, etc.

Well, a lot of soldiers did listen to Tokyo Rose and her German counterpart. But I think that's more akin to "500 cable channels and nothing to watch." But you're right, the world has changed much in the last 60 years. But you also have to remember that AfRaq has virtually no civilian impact. If we didn't see it on the news, not many of us would know it was happening. A WORLD war is a very, very different animal. Almost everyone has "skin" in the game. I don't see how we can avoid another one. The European Union unionized too quickly without realizing the incredible problems assembling such a vast new state entailed.
There are interesting times ahead, that's for sure. India/Pakistan, Japan/the Koreas/China, Israel/Iran, Iran/Irag, Tibet/China and dozens of other smoldering fires spread out around the world. Like cross-linked investments (penalties increasing amounts due when values fell, for example) the pacts and alliances between various nations almost guarantees that at least one of these hotspots is going to drag a lot of "extras" into the action.
-- Bobby G.
*CUTINHA, NICHOLAS J. Rank and organization: Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, Company C, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Gia Dinh, Republic of Vietnam, 2 March 1968. Born: 13 January 1945, Fernandina Beach, Fla. Gravely wounded, Sp4c. Cutinha maintained his position, refused assistance, and provided defensive fire for his comrades until he fell mortally wounded. He was solely responsible for killing 15 enemy soldiers while saving the lives of at least 9 members of his own unit.
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****Textbook instance of thread creep. Started out with a MOH hero (the one I saw on 60 Minutes), and ends up with the probable Goetterdaemmerung of Netflix.
--

HB

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