OSB "down" side

Aside from "feel", what's the reasoning behind the "down" side of OSB (vs. the "not down" side)?
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On Mon, 29 Feb 2016 11:09:35 -0700, Don Y

Atraditional??
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wrote:

Not sure but probably just the process of the way it is made. A roofer told me he puts the slick side down so he would not slide off. Not sure if that is the way it is suspose to be put on or not.
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On 2/29/2016 3:14 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I'm sure its a consequence of the way its made. But, it is clearly labeled "THIS SIDE DOWN" -- as if placing it *up* would be A Bad Thing.
E.g., Plywood with different finish grades has obvious reasons why you'd want the *good* ("A") side up -- appearance.
But, the "down" side of the OSB is the smoother of the two sides. I can't believe there are sufficient imperfections (bumps) in the not-smooth side that would interfere with it fitting against <whatever>.
[And, if so, the problem would be the same if on the *other* side!]

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Friction -- to keep your butt on the roof. On even a 4-pitch roof, laying it slick side up is distinctly dangerous.
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On 3/6/2016 9:10 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

So, in vertical orientations, there's no advantage to which side is "down" (in)?
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What does the manufacturer recommend? I'm sure that, whatever it is, there's a reason for it...
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