Ordering Gravel


I've got to order some gravel to expand my turnaround by the garage mostly to have more space to push snow (Maine) and I'm not sure what to order. A friend said gravel is sold by the size of the rocks in it and that I should order 2 inch...Is this true??? Thanks for any help.....
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It is sold by size, but I have no idea what is best for you. As the guys at the gravel place what will work best for you situation.
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The soil you're spreading it on will be a factor, mebbe requiring two layers - first a large aggregate, topped with something smaller. In my county DOT provides free asphalt grindings whenever they mill a road being prepared for resurfacing. They even deliver it!
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Gravel varies by region depending on the type of rocks and sand types that are available because it is very expensive to ship any distance. Given that, gravel is sold as washed which means that most of the fines are removed. This type is good for drainage as around foundations, if used on driveways the gravel tends to move around from driving on it. It is also sold as "crusher run" which includes the stone dust and fines from the crusher, this is a good base for driveways and roads as it packs down. In areas with sand and gravel mixed, this is also available for driveway bases and comes in a couple of qualities, around here it is called Granular A or Granular B, B is mostly sand.
Next it sold by size, pea gravel is about 1/4 to 3/8" in diameter. Then there is 3/4, 1", 2" and 6" stones. 2" and up is very difficult to move by hand, power equipment is best. Phone a couple of local aggregate suppliers and see what they recommend for your needs.

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For a driveway he's going to want crushed stone, not river gravel. Crushed stone is angular, so stays put. River gravel is smooth and slippery, and often much more expensive too.
    Una
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

If what you have, works, take a paper cup of it to the gravel place, and say 'I need more like this'. Note that you can't just dump it on the ground- it won't stay there. Ground needs to be scraped and sloped appropriately, and maybe compacted. A border helps, even just that plastic garden edging stuff. If you have to get a Big Yellow Machine in there, the driver will likely know the size usually used locally. You may need multiple layers of different sizes, if you want it pretty and pothole-free. Tamping and wetting-down after installation will help smooth it out and reduce the amount the plow or snowblower picks up.
-- aem sends...
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benick wrote:

In Maine, a better material to use is "reclaim." This is ground material taken up when roads are resurfaced. It packs much better than crushed rock. The problem with crushed rock is that it gets picked up by the plow blade, and in the snow being plowed, so that each spring you need to regrade. It's a never ending cycle. Spread gravel out in the spring, plow it to where you don't want it all winter, and spread it back to where you want it again in the spring. Reclaim stays put unless the plow operator digs into it.
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The area in question has already been scraped off as the driveway and garage are new. I just want to extend the turnaround back about 8 feet to the stonewall for snow storage ,15 feet wide. It is only about 8-10 inches of fill to be level with turaround with a slight slope toward the ditch...Thanks for all the info everyone...Atleast I won't sound totally stupid when I call them which was what I was shooting for...LOL...Thanks again....
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my neighbor tired of muddy gravel he had a unique solution
he had the driveway dug out deep, paved with asphalt, a low cost reclaimed kind. then covered with near a foot of gravel. 20 years later no mud.
he liked the look of gravel its the ONLY non muddy gravel driveway I have ever seen
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two inch is a bit large for a residential drive. 3/4 or one inch is more preferable. Unless you are starting a new spot, then a base of 2" covered with AB3 (some call it crush and run) and then the 3/4 on top all that the next year.
s

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On Oct 15, 1:05�am, "Steve Barker DLT"

2 inch diameter is tough to walk on, for a women in heels impossible.
3/4 much better choice for top surface
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