Ordering concrete for delivery

Hi, I finished my small concrete project today and next is to backfill the holes in the slabI have opened up in four bathrooms for the plumbing relocation. I have done the soil backfill, compaction, visqueen added back, rebar drilled and tied and all ready to go.
In this case there are just too much of it so I need to have it delivered.
I have not done this before, but when the truck comes how do you get the concrete from the truck into the house into the room that you need to do the pour? Do they shoot into a wheel barrow and you wheel it to where you need, dump it in and you go back out for more? or they have someone that will actually move the concrete to the desired location and finish it for you? I heard that some truck has a hose that you can carry to different areas to have the concrete pump through the hose. In my case I have 4 bathroom slabs to do so this will be very handy.
Any advise would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
MC
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Yes. It may be possible to pump it some distance. Talk to the supplier.
or they have someone that will

Thee are concrete contractors that will do the job for you. The mix supplier only supplies a driver to deliver. They stay with the truck.

Doubt you'll get it pumped to all places. Sounds like you'll need some experienced help as concrete sets up and then you are screwed if not finished. There is a limit as to how long the truck can stay too.
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MiamiCuse wrote: ...

...
How much (area to finish, yds to pour) you talking about?
You've no chance by yourself to offload and finish four sizable slabs by yourself in one pour.
You either need to be able to do these separately (not economically feasible since probably each isn't large enough for a delivery) or get some _EXPERIENCED_ help lined up for at least the finishing; you can just get some strong buddies and rent some 'barrows to hump into place, but once it's there, you've only got a limited time to screed, trowel and finish and four slabs of any size are more than you're going to do by one guy if not a pro 'cause you'll just not be fast enough to do a good job.
--
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I have about 52 SF of area to fill, 4" thick, so its 18 CF or less than 1 yard. It's not a lot but spread over 4 rooms, and some of the bathrooms are far from the main entrance.
Also, I do not have a straight smooth access to these rooms, whether it is from the main entrance or from the garage there are a few steps up to the main floor elevation, so I would need a ramp.
That is why I am curious about those special services that can actually extend a hose and let u direct it to the exact spot before they pump I think it's worth the trouble if the wheel barrow step is eliminated. I will have to arrange additional help.
MC
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Fifty sq ft is a really small area of concrete to finish BUT it's spread out over 4 rooms.
Some of the rooms are "far from the front door"
we used to routinely order & have pumped a truck or two of concrete ...we paid for a pumper to come & setup and pump the load
the charge was in the $150 to $250 range depending on time & quantity
I've you checked into having less than a yard delivered?....that's WAY below the minimum short load for typical transit mix
check the yellow pages for a mix truck service....one that has dry components and will mix what you need.
Honestly I think you're way too small a job for transit mix & pumper and maybe even a dry mix truck
I'd rent or borrow a mixer and do the rooms one at a time. You'll have way better control of the process.
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:
...

...
...
What he said... :)
--
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me too:)
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wrote:

I can have half a yard delivered to me. The $ is not a big issue but I am worried about the idle time. I remember a few years ago I had a concrete contractor do a job for me and he used a wheel barrow going back and forth and I left him alone for a few hours, when I got back I noticed bits and pieces of concrete over my pool deck and living room tiles, as well as wet concrete sprayed on my front door, and about a cubic foot of wet concrete poured into the back of a planter area that I had to take out. I don't want to repeat this again so that is why I am trying to have control over this time around, and I am worried about having to wheel from the truck to the room, the farthest one is about 170' of distance with 3 steps of stairs and through 3 doorways and 2 tight turns so it could be a challenge.
If I do it myself and one room at a time, by renting a mixer I can only mix a little at a time right? The largest area is 24 SF if I have to do it in multiple batches I am worried it will not have a consistent mix if I do mix and pour, mix and pour multiple times lasting several hours. Is this a concern?
Thanks,
MC
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form areas at a time.
or hire a contractor be there to supervise and tarp all areas wheelbarrow would pass thru. so no spilled concrete clean up
if your having work done at your home you REALLY NEED to be on site at all times.
my new wife didnt believe me till a contractor accidently damaged a water line here.
i was here to shut off the water fast. or a lot of damage would of occured.
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wrote:

Thanks for the reply.
If I have an area say 6'x4' and the depth is 4" to 5" deep. Since it's a slab I am filling back in, I want it to be as strong as possible. I already drilled and epoxyed rebars into the existing slab edges. If I form an area say 4'x2' and do it first, then wait to do the next 4'x2', and wait to do the last 4'x2', will the resulting slab be weaker than a continuous pour? Assume if each part was done say 2 hours apart?
Thanks again,
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote: ...

What do you need to support to worry about strength? It'll be strong enough to support a vehicle (think garage floor) as long as the subbase is solid (which really will be the limiting probably if you've dug).
Whether or how easily you can handle it in one pour would, obviously, depend on your physical condition and how organized you are when starting. Getting a buddy or two to help would still be a good idea, but it's surely doable.
--
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wrote:

24 sq/ft is within the capabilities of a mixer if you have help. that is ~24 60# bags if it is 6" deep. You should be able to do that in one shot.
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MC-
The details of this project ; constraints, pour sizes, locations, etc....... are coming out in dribs & drabs.
You don't say how large the "distant" pour is.
Here are a few truisms wrt to concrete (based on 15+ years of work with it, some academic research, some practical construction)
There is no substitute for experience.
Residential concrete is pretty simple stuff....it ain't rocket science.
You're way over thinking this project.
You are much too concerned about "consistent mix" and whether the slab with be "weaker" if poured in batches.
This is a residential "slab on grade not structural slab"......a way to keep dirt & moisture out of the house.
It doesn't take "hours" to mix and place 8 cubic ft of concrete using a mix with decent capacity.
Unless you're really experienced working on concrete alone sucks.
We could have mixed & placed & finished all the concrete in this project in fewer manhours than have been spent on this thread.
You're learning on your own job without the benefit of on site (eyes on) experienced guidance. Trying to do what you want done by yourself (?) and without prior experience is fraught with uncertainty & can generate a great deal of angst.
My suggestion is team up with someone substantially more experienced OR hire a contractor who is willing to hold your hand and do things the way you want them done and answer your questions along the way. Don't beat him down on price & be willing to pay extra. A firm fixed price low bid puts your desires & his desires at cross purposes. Or hire an "owner's rep".
I have years of heavy DIY'ing and years of design experience & years of construction experience AND I still sometimes can get bogged down in silly details. Luckily I have experienced people that can give me a reality check so that I don't infinitely focus on unimportant issues.
There is a time for design, a time for analysis & a time to "just do it"........

It only needs to be as strong as necessary ...... it's a "fitness for use" thing.
otherwise if 2500 psi concrete is "fit for use" why not substitute a 4000 or 5000 or 6000 psi mix?
cheers Bob
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Concrete is delivered and there is a standard amount of time that is allowed for you to empty the truck. Over that, you will be charged for "standing time". So, make double sure you have enough guys with wheelbarrows so they don't have to wait very long. Also, have some walkways or pads formed so if you have extra concrete, you get to use it instead of them taking it back and dumping it.
Steve
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