open circuit

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On Monday, May 26, 2014 8:06:28 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

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On Sun, 25 May 2014 22:35:42 -0400, "Robert Green"

and countertop receptacles are very commonly "dedicated" circuits, as is a Central Vac, the furnace, window A/C, etc.
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On Mon, 26 May 2014 03:34:36 -0700 (PDT), Frank Thompson

And what was the result???

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On Monday, May 26, 2014 8:15:12 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

know routing of wire, but not precise location of failure
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The OP has not said what he used to verify the breaker itself. A 100 watt light bulb on clip leads is what I would use to put an actual load on the b reaker. Anything else is subject to argument. I can't think that a staple in the wa ll would burn thru a wire without something smelling or light flickering or tripping the breaker itself. So for starters maybe the OP can tell us wha t he used to verify the breaker itself. Then, we can proceed with further a dvice.
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On Tuesday, May 27, 2014 12:05:17 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Replaced it with new breaker and also swapped it with breaker on another circuit. Open circuit remains on bad circuit and original breaker works on another circuit.
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On 5/27/2014 4:56 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

So, you didn't give any help on the real issues of isolating the problem. Seem desperately reluctant to actually say anything useful... :(
--


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Last time I tracked one of these down, it _was_ behind the wall. A nail from the exterior had pierced the romex and shorted N to G because the electrician hadn't centered the through-hole on the face of the stud.
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Have you actually put a test light bulb on the output side of the breaker to see if it really lights up?????????? A simple thing to do, and it is the only way you can really be sure there is voltage on the wires that go into the wall!!!!!!!!
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On Tuesday, May 27, 2014 10:05:42 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

and test lights on each conductor of the failure spot.
I believe its a kitchen outlet, perhaps theres a tripped GFCI in the circuit before the dead outlet
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On Tuesday, May 27, 2014 10:12:53 PM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

It is a kitchen outlet, but GFCI is on a different circuit.
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frank all kitchen outlets should be on a GFCI.
I suuuest you check every outlet in your home for power. every last one
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On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 7:36:14 AM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

Another question is the age of the house, ie if GFCI were required when it was built. And if there are any other GFCI on other outlets in the kitchen, bath, etc. If there are, then it would be unusual for the two that are out to not also be on GFCI. When he looks for other outlets, he should make sure to include ones in the garage, outdoors, etc. It's not unusual to find some indoor outlets sharing GFCI protection with one in the garage, outside, etc.
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On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 7:36:14 AM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

done
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Scott Lurndal was thinking very hard :

And!! What effect do you suppose that would have? :-? Certainly it would be unsafe but shorting N to G will not result in NO power at the outlet end. :-Z
--
John G

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Thank you John, I was wondering if I had faulty thinking exactly the same thing. The OP is not very forthcoming with answers to my questions either.
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When are you going to use an actual light bulb to test the circuit at the u tput of the breaker. Non-contact sensors can be fooled, and if there is an open in the ground side, almost anything can indicatevoltage, except an ac tual circuit load like a light bulb. It is beginning to appear that you ar e the dim bulb because you won't do the definitive test at the breaker outp ut.
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On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 9:27:32 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

an open in the ground side, almost anything can indicatevoltage, except an actual circuit load like a light bulb. It is beginning to appear that you are the dim bulb because you won't do the definitive test at the breaker ou tput.
He did say he swapped the breaker with a working one and also replaced it with a new breaker, both of which would rule out the breaker as the problem.
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On Wed, 28 May 2014 06:27:32 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

lie. Any current draw will clamp the voltage downstream of a high reistance / faulty breaker.
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But the OP says there is an open somewhere, so the voltage may not be clamp ed. I can't understand why the opposition to putting an actual light bulb on the breaker output to put the issue of a possible breaker problem to res t. Swapping out the breaker is probably the way to go, but the light bulb is 100% accurate. I have in my 78 years seen all sorts of phantom effects like the OP is talking about, and the light bulb or some other actual load is the only guaranteed way to do this.
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