Only use 60 watt bulbs?

Page 3 of 3  


(This is a 150 watt one costing $79.38)
Any big ones like these with a warmer color (lower color temperature) than 6500 or 5000K? Such a high color temperature may be good illuminating a yard at nighttime since high color temperatures are seen better by night vision. And if you get enough light to be as bright as a classroom or an office (100-180 footcandles or 1100-2000 lux) 4100 and 5000 look good, and 6500 looks great at sunlight-like illumination levels in the thousands of footcandles, but for indoor use I surely like 3500K or so!
Another issue where I would find fault with these particular big compact fluorescents, more like their marketer: They claim "full spectrum" - maybe they can get away with that since there is no industry-wide definition of "full spectrum" in the lighting industry. But I have seen the spectrum of enough compact fluorescents claiming "full spectrum" and I doubt anyone who sees the spectrum would call it that. But I don't think they need to make such a claim, since compact fluorescents normally have a color rendering index of 82, unlike the 62 of "old-tech cool white" and 53 of "old-tech warm white".
Also keep in mind: Compact fluorescents produce little infrared, and so they produce more non-radiant heat than incandescents of same wattage. I had a 42 watt compact fluorescent make a fixture slightly hotter than a 60 watt incandescent did. Also, compact fluorescents do not take heat as well as incandescents. Because of this, be judicious with high wattage compact fluorescents in terms of having them heat up fixtures or themselves.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Klipstein wrote:

Since Don prefers the cooler color temps, the 150watt monster above has little use indoors except in large area lighting, or in circadian rhythm adjustment. Walmart, Sams Club, Home Depot, Lowes, churches, schools and the like. In circadian rhythm adjustment, people are exposed to 10,000 lumen light for 15 minutes at a time, 3 days a week for 3-4 weeks to restore serotonin levels, depress melatonin levels
At 85W, 4200 lumens and $19.89, we have a spiral CF with a 3000K color temp
While Don and others may find that the 5000K+ light too blue/gray, a properly adjusted color TV (Tube, LCD, DLP, ...) is adjusted to be as close to 6400K as the set will allow to get as pure a white level as possible.
I agree with Don's assertion, the electronics inside CFs can be quite sensitive to heat, more so than a standard incandescent or halogen bulb. The old rule of thumb for linear fluorescents was that 1/3 of the energy consumed by the fixture was generated inside the analog ballast. Digital ballasts cut that energy use to under 10% of total fixture power. so with a total power of 42W, roughly 4W is dissipated inside the base, the rest is dissipated inside the tube. The issue is what happens when the lamp is inverted and air circulation is impaired. Heat generated by hte tube rises to heat up the electronics. This dramatically shortens lamp life. Some vendors will spec both max and min operating temps.
One spec that I found interesting is that for linear fluorescents, you get specs for both initial lumens and mean lumens. Mean is generally about 10% lower than initial.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net says...

Really? I've never seen this mentioned on the package for any of the CF bulbs I've bought. I have plenty of CF bulbs in enclosed fixtures, and have never had a problem.
In fact, I've got CF bulbs outside that are _supposed_ to be in an enclosed, weather- resistant fixture.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

My most frequent problem is that the larger bulbs do not fit in my outdoor fixtures and when I screw the cover on, the coils break. They are physicslly larger than standard bulbs and that is a problem for some fixtures. The lower wattage bulbs (equiv 75W incandescent or less) fit but the larger (100W or 150W incandescent equiv) rarely fit at all.
The OP's fixture does look plenty large though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
buffalobill wrote:

Why do you say this? If they dissipate the same power as a regular bulb they will, by definition, generate the same heat (unless they produce more light, in which case they'll generate _less_ heat).

--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
buffalobill wrote:

A 60 watt "Capsylite" or "Halogena" can be used wherever a 60 watt standard incandescent can. The heat output is the same. They warm up and cool more slowly since the glass is thicker, so they may appear to be hotter but they are not.

Permitted, partial list:
Philips SLS 15, 20 and non-dimmable 23 watt.

42 watt compact fluorescent produces at least much non-radiant heat as 60 watt incandescent - probably a bit more. Fixture can get hotter. Also, 42 watt compact fluorescents can easily suffer from heat buildup unless the fixture has air flowing freely. I would try for 26 watts at the most unless you have good free airflow - preferably with the bulb not base-up.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 02:19:59 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

A watt is a watt is a watt !
If your CF is rated at 42 watts. then it's producing 42 watts ( of heat )
If your incandescant is rated at 60 watts, then it's producing 60 watts of heat !
If a fixture is rated at 60 watts max, it doesn't matter what sort of 60 watts you use.
<rj>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com says...

No...
True, but not all of that heat is dissipated by the base. Some is heating the envelope, and some is radiated; heating the opposite wall.

...but not all heating the base.

It certainly does. *Temperature* is the issue and usually the base temperature, though the shade/diffuser might also be the limiting factor. If you think a watt is a watt, try touching a lit 40W fluorescent then a 40W halogen lamp.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I give up !
You must be working from a different Physics text.

<rj>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com says...

Nope. I read mine.
...and don't top-post either.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith Williams wrote:

Halogens operate at VERY high temps but still dissipate 40W of energy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Right. temperature <> energy
The issue here is the temperature of the base of the unit not how fast the meter spins.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com wrote:

60 watt incandescent produces, roughly:
3.4-3.5 watts visible light, .05 watt UV, and maybe about 30 watts of IR. The light, UV and IR largely escape the fixture without contributing to heating of the fixture. The radiated output contributes to heating of the room and of the building, but the radiation from the bulb that escapes the fixture does not contribute to heating of the fixture.
Roughly 26-27 or so watts conducted and convected heat.
42 watt compact fluorescent produces roughly:
8-9 watts of visible light, a fraction of a watt of UV and a couple to at most a few watts of IR.
Roughly 30 watts convected and conducted heat.
I have a floor lamp with a globe and a "Raytek" infrared non-contact thermometer. The globe gets slightly hotter with a 42 watt compact fluorescent than with a 60 watt incandescent.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray wrote:

If you use larger than 60 watt incandescent bulbs in those fixtures they will overheat and the plastic light socket will fail. Using the lights less will only cause them to take longer to fail it will not avoid the failure. The insulation on the fixture wires that supply the light socket may also degrade to the point of arcing but that usually takes a little longer to happen.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do the fixtures seem to be well ventilated? Is the shade open at the top?. Are there holes in the bottom of the fixture to let cool air in?
If fixture is not well ventilated, perhaps you can drill holes in it to drastically improve ventilation and allow you to go to 75 watt bulbs.
Keep in mind that not all 60 bulbs are equal. Clear vs. frosted, (clear is brighter, long-life vs. conventional (conventional is brighter).
Ray wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Possibly not conservative at all, if there is any good indication from my experience with a friend's "bankers' light" style desk lamp that takes tubular "short showcase" or "refrigerator" bulbs of T10 size.
The lamp is rated for maximum of 60 watts. With the included 60 watt bulb, the wires started burning near the socket, discoloring and producing a burning odor.
I have a suspicion why that happened: The lamp was designed overseas, where the line voltage was probably 230 volts. And there, the bulb of that shape and size and wattage may have a vacuum. 120V bulbs that shape, size and style have a vacuum up to 40 watts but the 60 watt one is at least sometimes gas-filled, due to wattage being near 25 watts per inch of filament length (if you do not uncoil the filament). That is roughly the "break-even point" where the ability of the usual gas fill slows down filament evaporation enough to permit a higher filament temperature that achieves increased light output for a given wattage and life expectancy despite the gas conducting heat from the filament. And, what I suspect is that the fixture was Ok with a vacuum-containing 60 watt bulb of that style but not a gas-filled one.
And, even if the fixture burns your home down for a reason other than the bulb being of higher wattage than the fixture is rated for, you can have liability trouble if the fire insurance company finds that the fire started at a fixture rated 60 watts max and having 75 or 100 watt lightbulbs.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.