Only use 60 watt bulbs?

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No, George, it's just that yours are so often incorrect... :-)

I'd just *love* to read a description of those tests, and your qualifications to design and conduct them and interpret their results.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

And how do you know that? have you measure the light output?
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No, but the manufacturer has. That's where they come up with the numbers on the package, George.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Miller wrote:

Like when Lights of America used to say on the package of their 45 watt one that it produced as much light as a 200 watt incandescent and that the light output in lumens was 3100? While it produced less light than a 150 watt incandescent rated to produce 2980 lumens? And in more recent years said the lumens was 2700?
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Klipstein) wrote:

Yeah, well, Lights of America is, shall we say, a "special case".
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

I'm going to answer Doug's comment first since I can't find it in the thread (must be some kind of screw up in the computer). So here it is.
I suggest you measure. The manufacturer probably does come up with the correct number but you would probably have to go through several gyrations to get it and it may be meaningless as a practical matter.
For examples, in recent years the ratings of electric motors have been so highly exaggerated that there was a spate of court case. For example the 5 hp motor rating on small air compressors got a lot of attention because it was such an egregious exaggeration. You simply cannot run a 5 hp motor on a 120V 15 or 20A circuit without tripping the circuit breaker. Most 1 hp motors on 120V will draw at least 10A so a 5 hp could be expected to draw 50 A. So much for manufacturer ratings.
Second, I believe Don touched on the point about light fixtures affecting the amount of light available. That is certainly important because lumen is spherical candle power. For the consumer, the most important fact is how much light hits the surface when installed in his/her fixtures and that means measuring foot-candles. So get a light meter and measure the foot candles.
I believe most of us with decent eyesight can just rely on them to determine comparative lighting intensity.
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Miller wrote:

Most 13 watt twintubes put out 820 or 825 lumens. At least one manufacturer that used to claim 900 said 820 or 825 in more recent years. And when temperature is non-ideal - fairly common in enclosed fixtures - the light output is even less.
Meanwhile, I don't see major brand 13 watt spirals claiming 900 lumens, although I have seen some Sylvania ones actually outshine 60 watt incandescents.
In my experience, it has been common for Lights of America and Maxlife compact fluorescents to fall short of claims back when I tried theirs - and Consumer Reports confirmed my experience in their October 1992 article. More recently, I tried some Maxlife ones and had them fall short - one seriously.
Another thing: The phosphor degrades, so compact fluorescents will fade slightly as they age.
I consider it fairly common for a 13 watt compact fluorescent to fall short of producing the output of a 60 watt incandescent. I have found it perfectly reasonable to need an 18, 19 or 20 watt compact fluorescent to not fall short of producing as much light as a 60 watt incandescent.

Sometimes it is true. Of course, I do find that matching or slightly exceeding the output of a 60 watt incandescent with only 18-20 watts is quite a bargain!
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Ray,
I would stick with the rated bulb but perhaps you need a flood or spot bulb to solve your problem. Even the lower wattage florencents that are rated at 100W output will work OK. Some fixtures have a heat sensor breaker which is a safety feature.
On the farside consider this. Your house catches on fire and the insurance investigator finds you installed a 100W bulb where it shouldn't be and they refuse to pay. Might never happen, but why take the chance.
J
Ray wrote:

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Ray wrote:

Before I did that, I'd probably try halogen bulbs. As I recall, they produce more light per watt, yet have similar color characteristics to regular bulbs (unlike the typical fluorescent).
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CJT wrote:

www.1000bulbs.com
CFs now come in color temps that match the BEST of what incandescents have. A 75w to 100W CF with color temp of 5000 to 6500 Kelvin will produce great looking light
http://www.1000bulbs.com/product.php?product 30
This is an example of a 75W model (only uses 18W of electricity), 10,000 hour rated life $6.15. It fits inside the fixture that is being used (4.8 inches long, 2.3 inches wide) 6500 Kelving color temp matches overhead sun on a cloudless, pollution free day.
http://www.1000bulbs.com/product.php?product 046
This is an example of a 100W model (only uses 23W of electricity), 15,000 hours rated life $8.43. Same size as 75W lamp above.
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Gammon wrote:

That color is icy cold pure white to bluish. At typical home illumination levels, this can produce a "dreary gray" effect.

Overhead sun on a cloudless pollution free day is about 5200-5400 Kelvin. 6500 is more blue than that - more blue even than sunlight in space, which is about 5700 or 5800 K. Even 5000 is "icy cold" at typical indoor illumination levels. 4100-4300 is the color of "cool white" fluorescents. I am aware of different fluorescents with different color rendering properties and same color temperature, but 4100 is considered by most to be "not warm enough" unless the lighting evel is as as high as that typical in an office or a classroom. 3500 kelvin is something I sure find pleasing in home use while "more white" than incandescents and 2700K compact fluorescents.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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wrote:

Back to the original post above,
Don't use any incandescent bulbs higher than 60 watts in a fixture rated for just 60 watts.
I have tenants put in higher wattage bulbs on a frequent basis. It destroys fixtures, start small (perhaps big) fires and causes flickering lghts. The higher wattage causes heat build up that typically oxidizes the rivets holding the wires to the sockets in most fixtures, may scorch the surrounding area, crack glass shades and melt plastic ones.
I've even seen heavy damage casued by upping the useage to a 75 watt bulb over a 60 watter. The heat buildup, even over a fairly short time, is amazing.
The above topic is a constant running battle I have with tenants.
Doug (sparks)
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Light output per watt is only slightly greater with halogen than with a decent incandescent. A 60 watt halogen produces 900-960 lumens when a 60 watt standard incandescent normally produces 870.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Ray wrote:

Why do you think they put that sticker on there? Someone tested it and found it was not safe. You are too cheap to do it right so you want to ignore the safety notice. Are you smart?
Rather than looking for an excuse to ignore the safety warning, let's look for a way to brighten up the room.
I replaced half my lamps with CF. I reduced the total wattage and greatly increased the amount and quality of light. Try it.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Probably not very.
Overlooking the safety implications of exceeding the maximum wattage allowed, much can be determined by whether or not the bulb(s) is enclosed. Heat is the bad guy here. At best you'll have to change burned-out bulbs more quickly using an oversized bulb. At worst you'll have to remodel your bathroom again. Possibly even the whole house. (no joke)
I wouldn't consider anything larger than a 75-watter.
Still not enough light? Do something different but, for safety considerations, do it right.

Yeah, but the wattage restriction is for when you forget to turn it off before you drive off on your two week vacation.
CF (compact fluorescent) bulbs might be a solution.
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:)
JR

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wrote:

finding
allowed,
the
again.
before
Or painting the walls white. If OP has a dark wall color, or wallpaper, those little 60w will get lost. Wall sconces are cheap, and trivial to change- I'd get different fixtures.
aem sends...
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wrote:

Add another pair of sconces flanking the ones you've got, about 8" over and a foot higher.
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That's a GREAT suggestion. Electrically, that would be easy.
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JR

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by your illustration, your fixture is enclosed. halogen bulbs are too hot for this fixture. for many compact fluorescent light bulbs no enclosure is permitted. you could remove the nice decorative covers permanently and screw in a compact flourescent light bulb of your favorite design of maybe 42 [nice and bright reading and shaving light] or 26 watts [comes out at about 100 watts of light after warmup]. for others choosing fixtures you'll want up to 400 watts worth of light for reading, which you can achieve with four x 26 watt CFL's for example. when selecting new light fixtures consider height to illuminate under chins to be shaved as well as usual eye level angle. a vertical old style fluorescent on each side of medicine cabinet mirror was ideal for this angle of lighting but not always bright enough. consider subject to your climate whatever your modern equivalent choice might be for the nice old style clear infrared 250 watt heat lamps for reading and stepping out of a hot shower into a cooler bathroom.
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buffalobill wrote:

http://www.1000bulbs.com/product.php?product 42
For reading, in a lamp that has a harp that will accept this bulb, 55W of electricity, 3600 lumens of light, about same as 240W bulb 4.45 inches in diameter, 8.39 inches long $15.xx, 8000 hours lamp life. High color fidelity for this lamp.
http://www.1000bulbs.com/product.php?product 90
This one will fit in most lamps easier as it is narrower 3.74 inches, 10W more electricity at 65W, 3400 lumens of light, and 9.65 inches tall, 8000 hours life 20.95 each Very high color fidelity for this lamp.
Or for a REALLY bright light
http://www.1000bulbs.com/product.php?product 688
10,000 LUMENS, 6500 Kelvin color temp, 10,000 hour lamp life A lamp like this one is used for circadian therapy, 15 minutes a day 2-3 times a week for a month to get body clocks reset to normal (for folks that seem to have trouble sleeping and are tired, sleepy most of the day - insomniacs - more of a problem the further north/south you go - i.e. getting to within a few hundred miles of either the Arctic or Antartic Circle.)
I use these examples MERELY to point out that the selection of CFs is MUCH higher than what we see at WalMart, Home Depot, and Lowes or similar stores. There are several such vendors (like 1000bulbs) out there. CFLs are NOT the same as your memory of them
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