Only use 60 watt bulbs?

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We just had out bathroom remodeled and decided on 2 wall sconces for the lighting. The sconces are rated for 60 watt bulbs max, but now I'm finding that it is a bit dimmer in the bathroom than I would prefer.
How conservative are those ratings? Would it really be a big deal if I put 75 or even 100 watt bulbs in the sconces? If it were a light that were on for hours at a time, I probably wouldn't do it, but bathrooms lights are probably on 30-45 minutes max at a time during showers and even less during routine visits.
--
Ray

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...

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I'm not sure if the ratings of 60W is for continuous use - suspect so, because someone can potentially leave the light on for days.
So for a carful user, I'd say by all means go up a notch.
RichK
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Ray wrote:

Probably not a problem unless there is some sort of cover on the bulbs.
I might try clear glass bulbs if you have not already, or perhaps compact fluorescent
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Here are the sconces...
http://www.rejuvenation.com/fixshowW372/templates/selection.phtml?iqg f91e70a5f4a0fd95c6e74657b7492a
and they do have a cover

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Really nice sconces. I am quite certain the limit is the cover as they are not well ventilated. Looking at other posts, the consensus seems to be for compact fluorescents. Try the one that is listed as equivalent to 100W. Those I think are actually about 23 watts. It seems to me that it takes a minute or two for them to come to full brightness.
For me they seem to have a higher failure rate when used in enclosed fixtures but for your use that should not be a problem because they will not be on continuously.
Ray wrote:

http://www.rejuvenation.com/fixshowW372/templates/selection.phtml?iqg f91e70a5f4a0fd95c6e74657b7492a
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Rich256 wrote:

You have not seen modern CFs work. The new ones are at full brightness in less than 15 seconds. The older twin tube lamps had the slow on cycle that you are remembering.
I have two CFs, twin tube in my bath ceiling 13W each. They have been in there for 10 years with not a single failure. I will change then out soon for 15W lamps with a better color output. This is a completely enclosed fixture.
The longest running application is the outside light fixtures. They are on about 8 hours a night, 7 days a week or about 2900 hours a year. The fixture is open at the bottom and the lamps are mounted in an inverted position. Its about a 2-3 year interval between lamp replacements there. The ballast gets WARM in this application.
Depending on manufacturer, the 100W bulbs are either 23W or 27W. For most pleasant color, look for bulbs with 4100 Kelvin color rating or higher. 6400 Kelvin gives the best rendition of color, aka Stark White. Many think this color has some Blue in it, a very pleasant contrast to the yellows and greens of incandescents and older fluorescents. The garden variety bulb at Walmart, Home Depot and the like has a 2700 kelvin color temp. This color is one of the traditional colors of fluorescent lamps and we have all become uneasy with it. 4100K looks so MUCH better (I have a F25T8 fixture with a couple of 4100K lamps in it). They look wonderful compared to the other 2700K lamps beside them.
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Robert Gammon wrote:

I have new ones. Just as you said, even with them it takes a few seconds for full brightness. Some people might object to even that short delay.
And like you I have outdoor ones that seem to last forever. Very pleased with them.
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FWIW, I mostly use fluorescents. For the outside bulbs, I use the exterior rated floodlights. In warm weather, they light up pretty quick. In cold weather, they take a bit to come on so I use 1 CF and 1 regular without a problem (by cold, I mean below freezing). Also use a regular interior bulb outside in a protected location with no problems.
Inside, I notice when the bulbs are new they sometime take a bit to come on, but after that they are pretty quick -- I always figured that they needed to charge the coil or something when new.
When I have mixed brands, I have noticed some have slightly different lags.
The problem that I have is that who of my fixtures won't take the CF bulbs because they are so thick near the base.
BTY, at my mother's house I installed the CF for ceiling fans. They work well and have a large round bulb covering the coils so they look okay.
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Compact flourescents are often not designed for use inside enclosed fixtures. My guess is that the electronics inside them overheat without ventilation. Check the manufacturers specs.
Bob
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I installed compact fluorescent bulbs in a couple of our ceiling fixtures. With 12' ceilings, I was hoping this would minimize bulb changes.
Unfortunately, our fixtures are completely enclosed under a glass dome, and the CF bulbs died in just a few months, less time than a regular light bulb.
The rest of our light fixtures need "short" bulbs (I use ceiling fan bulbs). CF bulbs (and normal light bulbs) stick down below the fixtures and look terrible.
And, our porch lights are on special motion switches that won't work with the CF bulbs.
So, unfortunately in our case, we can't use CF bulbs in our current house. I installed them in our old house and loved them. The bulbs were still going strong 5 years after I installed them.
Anthony
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I have CF's on motion detectors. I believe my old detectors use internal relays to actually switch the power.
Bob
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wrote:

It has a shade, but from that webpage, I can't tell if it is covered at the TOP or not. I suspect it isn't.
The top is what counts.
So the heat will exit.
I have in my kitchen a 3 bulb fixture, each bulb with a sphere of glass totally enveloping the bulb, except for a little bit around the socket. Because of lack of light, I've used up to 100 watt bulbs instead of the 60 Max. Nothing has failed except for the plastic or whatever surrounds the metal threads of the light socket. Large pieces of 2 of the sockets have fallen off. It seems to happen when I'm changing a burned out bulb. But in my reckless yet well informed opinion the lack of this plastic is not important if the fixture was wired correctly and the metal threads are connected to the neutral**. Or if I turn off the fixtture before replacing bulbs, which I don't do. Or if I'm careful not to touch it. But careful only lasts for the first 10 years.
ON SECOND LOOK, THIS PARAGRAPH IS NOT APPLICABLE TO THE FIXTURE IN THE URL: OTOH, with the design of your fixture, you won't be able to touch the outside of the socket even if the plastic breaks and falls off. It would be much more likely that you touch the inside, and that will be the same when the fixture is new and perfect.
**In general, don't forget that the original electrician may have wired it correctly, but the painter, or you when you paint, may remove the fixture to paint under it without painting IT, and wire it backwards when replacing.
Also worth noting that though I own several voltmeters, digital and mechanical, I've never bothered checking if the electrician installed it right. He made two small mistakes in this house that I know of. Anyone can get something backwards once in a while.

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Ray wrote:

Put in two 13 watt fluorescents (60 watts of light) and you get all the light you want and won't violate the heat specs of the fixture. About $2 each
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Robert Gammon wrote:

Two 13 watt fluorescents will put out less light that two 60 watt incandescent bulbs. Don't care what the package says. Substitute one 4 bulb holder and it will immediately be clear (even if the cover is translucent) which is the 13 watt fluorescent bulb. You need to go up at least one size of fluorescent to achieve the light output of a 60 watt bulb.
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Actually, they put out more.

In other words, "don't confuse me with the facts", eh? The facts in this case are: 13W CF, 900 lumens; 60W soft white incandescent, 840 lumens.

Well, of course it is. The color is slightly different, the shape is radically different, and it's brighter.

That just isn't true.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Yeah, but aren't their color temperatures different? Maybe ypu'd perceive one different than the other in operation.

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FDR wrote:

BEST comment yet. to adequately compare incandescent light output to fluorescent light output, the color temp needs to be the same and the calibrated light output on BOTH bulbs must be the same. Otherwise, we will see a difference!!
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Depends on the type of CF bulb. The ones I get at Home Depot are pretty nearly the same color as incandescents.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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FDR wrote:

Of course the color temperature is different, but so is the intensity. Before you jump on Doug's band wagon maybe you should do some tests; Doug seems to be an absolutest, i.e, his opinions are always the absolute fact.
It quite apparent to anyone I have asked that a 13 W fluorescent, mixed with 60 W incandescents are not only a different color but not as bright. Since the human eye is extremely sensitive to small color changes and small differences in intensity, a detectable difference would not be unexpected.
Also, I don't need to rely on my, and other's, eyes or the manufacturer's statement. My test show that my 60 W incandescent bulbs are at least 10 percent brighter than my 13 W fluorescents.
No suppositions, no opinions, just facts derived from tests.
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