Only good mouse is a dead mouse, yes, but how to get there?

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On Sun, 21 Dec 2008 17:50:22 -0500, trader-of-some-jacks
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I like the bucket for multiple catches.
But I have to plug victor's new electric traps. 4 aa batteries & it electrocutes the little buggers. Flip open the top & dump in toilet. No mess, no touching anything the dead mouse touched. I got 10 on the first set of AA's over a 2 week period.
The signal light was supposed to glow red when the battery was weak-- but when my peanut butter disappeared without a mouse I changed batteries and got a few more the next week.
A little pricey at $20, but I'm glad it was marked wrong at my local Lowes.
Jim
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trader-of-some-jacks wrote:

These two are better than the Looney Tune ones, that I never got very good at setting, let alone then sitting them down without tripping them, however they don't meet all of your requirements.
http://www.victorpest.com/store/rodent-control/M130 They are very easy to set, and do the job. Unfortunately, you do need to reset and rebait them, but I just use something like a tongue depressor or wooden coffee stirrer (and a jar of peanut butter devoted to that purpose only!). And they are very easy to empty, but you do have to do it manually.
Same with this one - http://www.d-conproducts.com/traps/ultra-set.html . It's even easier to empty, and it's covered so you don't even have to see the mouse. (I actually got pretty good at emptying it into a plastic bag without actually looking, LOL).
OTOH, if I had another mouse invasion (like I had a few years ago from some nearby construction), I'd definitely try the battery op one someone else mentioned.
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poision they may not leave die and stink up your home, that happened to a buddy of mine.........
smell lasted 2 weeks:(
you must prevent entry, seal every little crack and crevice, leave NO FOOD SOURCE AROUND.
We were over run once when I was feeding birds sunflower seeds. evicted near 40 mice.
used a live trap released them away from home, no they didnt re enter.........
why kill anything un necessarily?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Outdoors, they are wild life. Indoors they are vermin.
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like I said close all openings and DONT leave a food source around espically in the basement.......
I live trap, if i can move the mice baCK OUTSIDE WHERE THEY BELONG, THEY ARE AGAIN WILDLIFE
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

No......they are vermin who know a good food source inside your home. I don't know what kind of bacteria you might brew in your bucket while you compost rodents, but it seems really disgusting :o)
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I can attest to how convenient these traps are. They pose no danger to the user, as the older "spring-snap" type did. http://www.victorpest.com/store/rodent-control/M130 They are easy to bait and catch a lot of mice. If you put peanut butter on the trigger you can catch several mice before you have to re-bait the trap. You can cleanly open the trap (without touching the mouse)and drop the little bugger in the toilet for flushing.
Occasionally the trap will only grab the mouse and not kill it. This is awkward. I solve it by dropping the trap and mouse into a bucket of water. When you pick the (trap/live mouse) up you have to be sure you don't open the trap and let the little bugger get away. The whole thing sinks and drowns the mouse. Not the best scenario, but it works.
HTH, EJ in NJ
Lee B wrote:

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I use this kind of trap, but rather than baiting with peanut butter, I superglue a couple pieces of mouse bait to the trigger. I can get 12-20 mice in a year this way without having to rebait the trap. The bait I use is greenish, comes in a little cellophane bag, and consists of little cylindrical pieces about 1/2" long and maybe 1/8" in diameter.
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the sticky pads work good. put them around the edges where they run. you don't have to fold them into a tube.
s

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trader-of-some-jacks wrote:

Hi, Out in my back yard there are mice colony. But I don't have any one inside the house. Peppermint oil smell is good mouse chaser. Since weather got so cold, we have birds, peasants, wild bunnies, deer in my back yard for food.
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trader-of-some-jacks wrote:

Let's see... you want:
1. No or minimal baiting. 2. Automatic resetting. 3. Deals with multiple rodents. 4. Easy to reuse. 5. Self cleaning.
Think cat.
You can even borrow one.
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HeyBub wrote:

Look up "Towser," a cat who, for 23 years, was the "Mouser-In-Chief" at the Glennturrent Distillery in Scotland. During her career she dispatched 23,898 mice (plus a few rats and an occasional rabbit).
Enshrined in the Guiness Book of Records, Towser averaged about three mice per day during her service.
As an aside, if I were Towser's supervisor, and she was brining me three mice a day, I'd have hired a mouser-trainee to assist in the project.
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HeyBub wrote:

Trouble with cats is the also go after the birds. If you hate birds then it's ok.
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 11:52:18 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

A few years back the BBC aired a program where cat owners retrieved and kept (frozen) all of the birds that they could from their free-roaming cats. Every owner was astonished at the number and variety. Keeping in mind that the cats likely captured many others that the owners never found out about.
The majority were song-birds and they showed footage of cats capturing many of these both from branches and actually plucking them from the air. You grossly underestimate cat's skills if you think they can only capture slow birds on the ground.
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 18:11:44 GMT, Rick Brandt

Red squirrels kill more birds than do cats in our area by a factor of more than ten to one. They will clean out a nest faster than you can blink - and NOTHING is out of reach to them.
Too bad the little buggers are so viscous that not many cats will take THEM on.
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Rick Brandt wrote:

You're probably right. I've seen my cats interact with Mocking birds. After a few desultory lunges, the cats try really, really hard to ignore the pest. It seemed to me that going after a bird was calculated as almost futile.
There was an Animal Planet show a bit back ranking the top ten feline predators based on what they hunted. As I recall, number ten was some obscure Indonesian cat that had only two prey: mud turtles and fungus. The list went up through lions, cheetas, bobcats, and so on to number one. The most ecumenical hunter of all the cats was ... wait for it ... the domestic house cat! Yes, your ordinary kitty has over 10,000 enumerated species on its menu, including small birds, rodents, insects, worms, snakes, small mammals, amphibians, larger birds (like chickens), moles, spiders, and toilet tissue.
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On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 07:08:39 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

Don't forget the odd set of toes that happen to make the covers move. I swear when we had cats I was tempted to wear my slippers to bed.
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wrote:

_____________________________________________________________________
Somebody here suggested 'peppermint oil'.
That leads one to ask; "What about those strong smelling camphorated 'moth balls'.
They any good to deter mice????
Cheers. Greetings of the Season and New year.
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Well, sometimes cats and birds have the same thought. As in this pic, both are thinking "dinner".
http://tinypic.com/view.php?piciegsw&s=5
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On Sun, 21 Dec 2008 17:50:22 -0500, trader-of-some-jacks

A 5 gallon steel pail 1/2 full of water, with aramp up to the top and a stich across the top - with the bait on a metal wheel off the side. When the mouse goes for the bait, the slick wheel turns and dumps him into the water. He might swim for a while but he won't last long.
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