one-wire pole transformers

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Google "Single-wire earth return" (SWER) for a diagram and explanation - as others have said, it uses earth grounding for the return path.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-wire_earth_return
wrote:

The thing is, everything I know about electricity says that you need TWO wires to make a complete circuit. AC or DC, doesn't matter.
Most streets have two overhead wires, with two wires going to the transformer.
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SRN wrote:

The norm is one to three phase conductors at the top of the pole or on the cross arm at the top of the pole, with the neutral for those on the pole a few feet down, and the low voltage secondaries if present a few feet below that. The neutral is grounded at least every few poles with a small uninsulated wire down the side of the pole that connects to a plate at the bottom of the pole underground. The SWER or delta (two phase conductors, no neutral) configurations are obsolete and only found in areas with old infrastructure.
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For purposes of this discussion, you are correct. These IS another wire somewhere. It may be running down the pole to the ground (using the earth as most of the "wire") and may look like a steel support cable...
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On 2/24/2012 2:01 PM, Larry Fishel wrote:

In the US in a residential area, indeed.
In some (very) rural areas of Sask, CA, I saw one-line w/ earth return as recently as roughly 20-yr ago yet...
--
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On Fri, 24 Feb 2012 08:30:26 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

http://imgur.com/gFrGB
I used 8000 for the primary from someone's earlier post. No clue what it really is.
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Metspitzer wrote:

I believe 7,200V is about the lowest you will find anywhere and most are 13,200V or more.
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I was lying in bed one day watching guys adding a new transformer outside the window. When trying to clip the wire onto the hv wire I saw a pretty good arc. Probably at least 3 inches. A transformer feeding the house burnt out, so they replaced that, and added another transformer in addition to original. Result our house had less voltage fluctuations. When young, I used to use the shortwave radio, and ever so often, maybe twice a ay, a horrendous arching- buzzing sound would build up and quickly stop. Lasting 3-4 seconds. I never found the source of that. Didn't sound like anything that would be consumer generated.
Greg
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On 2/24/2012 6:52 PM, gregz wrote:

It could have been a static discharge from your antenna if you had an external antenna. Or it could have been a static electricity discharge from another source, even atmospheric. Another source may have been power company or an industrial site switching high voltage power at certain times every day. I can remember listening to distant stations on an AM radio in different bands and hearing a "zip..zip..zip" sound at regular intervals.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

HID Street light ballast igniters are known to produce a lot of RFI when they come on at night, and if they have a bad lamp attached they cycle endlessly producing interference. With the switch to LED street lights and even parking lot lights that problem should gradually become a thing of the past.
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On 2/24/2012 8:14 PM, Pete C. wrote:

A electrical engineer friend of mine was once the head of a power company communications division and he told me that many complaints of radio interference his department investigated turned out to be caused by defective doorbell transformers.
TDD
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On 2/25/2012 1:56 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Sounded pretty crazy the first time I saw you post it.
Jeff Wisnia came up with an FCC interference handbook http://tinyurl.com/63ob78 or http://transition.fcc.gov/ftp/Bureaus/Mass_Media/Databases/documents_collection/1993InterferenceHandbook.pdf
that gives details. Some doorbell transformers have a thermal protector on the primary that opens (and closes) if the transformer overheats. (It may be part of the limitation on current/power for a class 2 transformer.) It can wind up cycling maybe 7 times a second. My guess is that doorbell transformers have not been made that way for quite a while.
--
bud--

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http://transition.fcc.gov/ftp/Bureaus/Mass_Media/Databases/documents_collection/1993InterferenceHandbook.pdf
I had two houses but never heard of that. Perhaps I did and forgot. Years ago our ham club had an interference expert from PG&E, come in to our meeting. The way he tracked down that type of interference was use am radios. You start at the broadcast band then work your way up in frequency, narrowing down the location. Like, am broadcast, cb, aircraft band, etc.
The transformers I see know have a thermal break, for good.
Greg
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On 2/25/2012 1:04 PM, gregz wrote:

I've used pocket sized AM radios for years to find powered Romex inside walls before making any cuts into plaster or Sheetrock. ^_^
TDD
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Oh, this is cheap and great for finding near field electrostatic noise, and 60 power lines. Using the transmitter, unpowered wires.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cable-tracker-94181.html
Greg
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On 2/25/2012 8:43 PM, gregz wrote:

Back in the 1980's when I was installing a halon fire suppression system in a mission control center, I used similar more expensive gear to trace hundreds of wires. The goose neck on the probe is a feature not seen on the domestically manufactured equipment. It looks handy enough to justify adding it to my collection, especially if someone wants to borrow my tone tracer set which costs around $80.00 and people are bad about breaking things they borrow. ^_^
TDD
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I never used the transmitter yet. I always was thinking of buying the more expensive unit.
Most of these are billed as having induction. This does not mean magnetic or emf. It's strictly electrostatic field. One day I'm going to modify it to pick up either field, for the ghost hunters !!
Greg
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On 2/27/2012 11:50 AM, gregz wrote:

Oh heck! Get on Amazon and search EMF meters. ^_^
(Amazon.com product link shortened)30386014&sr=1-1
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7bfaqxt
TDD
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)30386014&sr=1-1
Too hard for me to cut.
The trouble with most emf meters, they don't tell frequency. With a speaker at least you hear harmonics. Even 60 hz is difficult or impossible to hear without headphones.
Greg
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On 2/27/2012 7:41 PM, gregz wrote:

For a strange hearing experience, I have an ultrasonic leak detector that listens for the high frequency sound waves caused by escaping gas from tiny pinholes. It has a bar graph display composed of LED's and an earphone output for headphones. The circuitry picks up the ultrasound and converts it to audio in the range of human hearing. A ring of keys being slightly shaken sounds like wind chimes in the headphones and rubbing your fingers together lets you hear the sound the ridges and valleys that make up your fingerprints produce when scratching over each other. If you ever wondered why shaking keys make dogs go nuts, you'll know why when listening to the ultrasound through the detector. ^_^
TDD
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I got a laser with chain, which I sometimes entertain the cats with. I can't pick it up without them looking at me.
Greg
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