One hose portable AC?

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On 06/24/2014 11:41 AM, micky wrote:

A thermocouple makes electricity when the two ends are at different temperatures. The electronic cooler device does the opposite. It makes a difference in temperature (hot on one side, cold on the other) when DC electricity passes through it.
I have seen ads for coolers that use ice.
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humid areas all it will do is make things worse.
The device that may plug into a car lighter socket is based on the Peltier effect. Sort of a solid state heat pump. A special diode like device that one side gets cool and the other side gets hot. I have seen coolers made from them and where I worked we had a piece of test equipment that used one so we could calibrate some instrumentation. I don't know how practical it would be to make one room size, but doubt it could be done without large ammounts of money spent. Not sure how efficent it may be either.
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On Wed, 25 Jun 2014 14:08:13 -0500, Mark Lloyd

Yes, but Peletaire was the Brazilian soccer version.
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On Wed, 25 Jun 2014 14:12:15 -0500, Mark Lloyd

Yeah, but I wouldn't call those miracle coolers.
I've been looking for a portable air conditioner that used a Peltier junction, but haven't found one yet. The biggest thing I've found is one of those cube-shaped motel or office fridge.
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2014 05:49:38 -0700 (PDT), BenDarrenBach

Thanks. One that says it's 12btu also says it runs on 12 or 13 amps. You've warned me and I'll make sure she doesn't buy one that uses 15 or more. (I'm going to pick it up and bring it home too, unless she gets one by mail.) I don't know what else she has on the circuit she would use.
Did you or Tegger notice the rest of your home getting hotter when you used these?
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On Tuesday, June 24, 2014 8:13:41 AM UTC-5, micky wrote:

No...our house is well insulated and sealed (vented eaves and peak vents).
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wrote:

hot humid climates, the temperature often approaches the dewpoint at night. When the outside air is very humid and you bring it into the basement, it could easily cool down to the dewpoint temerature and condense on walls, pipes, and anything else down there. You can damage things stored in the basement and encourage mold and mildew problems.
Pat
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Nope. At least not that we noticed; we were only concerned with cooling that one room, which was a bedroom. We didn't mind sweltering during the day, but trying to sleep in 90+ temperatures was impossible.
And both of our units ran off a standard 120V/15A wall outlet.
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You do get used to the noise, which is about the same as a window unit.

We never bothered with any of that. It's more important to keep the newly- cooled air inside the room than it is to give the room a particular temperature of feed-air.
Just keep the room-door closed to allow the cool air to stay inside and the room will cool to the point where you will eventually want to pull the blankets over you. Those portables are pretty effective for one room; you'll have noticeable cooling in about ten minutes, with the door kept shut.
The portables also operate as dehumidifiers, which makes them really handy in the basement once you have your normal A/C back.
Two isses I've found with the portables: 1) They're very heavy and bulky. It takes a man to lug them up and down stairs, and even he's going to need to work at it.. 2) Moving them too abruptly can cause their water reservoirs to slosh and spill on the carpet, which is a bit of a nuisance..
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4ax.com:

That doesn't happen. The room being cooled ends up dryer than the rest of the house, which remains only as moist as it would be anyway in the absence of the portable.
The units act as dehumidifiers even in A/C mode, which is why the reservoir fills up and needs to be emptied once in a while. Remember, portables can't simply let their water drip outside, but must drip their water into an internal pan instead.
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On Tuesday, June 24, 2014 9:32:25 AM UTC-5, Tegger wrote:

Just to add...I haven't yet (3rd season) had to drain either unit of water! They will indicate if they fill and shut-off (hasn't happened). The units are said to have ultra-sonic water dispersion thru the exhaust hose...
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wrote:

(both lower temp and lower humidity). I was responding to the comment that air would be drawn in through the basement windows to replace the hot air exhausted from the A/C in the bedroom.
Am I correct in assuming a "one hose" A/C exhausts hot air from the condenser coil through that one hose, but uses inside air to feed that?
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On 6/24/2014 10:47 AM, Pat wrote:

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Yes.
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2014 08:51:36 -0700 (PDT), BenDarrenBach

very interesting.
One that I looked at on line had "self-evaporation" but I think it, or another one?, also had a place for a tube at the bottom and a garden hose about a foot up.
Another one I looked at came with RCA, Magnavox, Sylvania, and Keystone brand names on it.
As to the basement rust, Pat, we've both had floods of various sorts inthe basement and it didn't lead to rust, but if worst comes to worst, she can close her basement window.
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Tegger wrote:

I think he meant condensation will form in the basement area , not the area being cooled . I can see that happening , just as when I open my shop that's cooled all night and it's 90%/90? outside I get condensation on my machine tools . I keep the door closed until it's as warm inside as out <not really well insulated converted freestanding metal carport> . Or turn on the window unit and keep the door closed .
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wrote:

That sounds very good. What brand, model do you have?

It is the same model, not another one, but they might have changed the design. A new one is advertised as having "The no-bucket design" but otoh that might just mean there's no bucket but a hose. Clever these ad copywriters.

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On Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:49:14 AM UTC-5, micky wrote:

http://alatest.com/reviews/air-conditioning-reviews/air-ky-120e1-sg-pac-12e1-12-000-btu-portable-ac-air-conditioner-dehumidifier-fan/po3-158858711,349/
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If you're talking about the kind that sits on the floor and has a 4-6 inch hose that you run out the window.... I've got one and would never get another like it.
It cools just fine, but the condensate drain is 3-inches from the floor and has to drain into a pan or through a tube you have to run along the floor to outside. It's a royal pain to use. Don't even get started with one of those.
Some of these type models claim to 're-evaporate' the condensate, but I don't believe them.
You'll be mopping up water I guaranteed it with either one of these.
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On 6/24/2014 8:59 PM, Guv Bob wrote:

high, and drain the condensate out the window?
"oh what fun it is, to drain a One... hose.... open.... AC"
sung to the tune of Jingle Bells
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