One circuit often blows

Page 3 of 3  


That's kinda redundant, no? "If it works, it works but if it doesn't, you should have done something else", sort of argument.

Others have brought this up. Others have also, rightly, pointed out that circuit breakers weaken after multiple trips. It should be replaced anyway. If that solves the problem, all done. If not, you're right; the problem was something else.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Now THAT is interesting! Just as a matter of intellectual curiosity, what makes the breaker "weaken after multiple trips". Inquiring minds...
 It should be replaced anyway.

That seems to be the consensus, so here goes finding an electrician, fingers crossed.
Don't forget to explain about weakening after multiple trips
TIA
HB
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not sure, but I think it's wear on the mechanical parts (springs, friction surfaces to determine trip levels, etc.). These things, unless rated as switches, aren't intended to be cycled manually either.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wrote a reply but guess it didn't make it.
I DID "answer a few questions" multiple times. Made it clear that no other outlets on that circuit, and no outlets in other rooms draw current worth a damn.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I wrote a reply but guess it didn't make it.
I DID "answer a few questions" multiple times. Made it clear that no other outlets on that circuit, and no outlets in other rooms draw current worth a damn.
HB, you never said if the circuit is 15 or 20 amp. The number is written on the breaker handle. If it is a 15 amp circuit, and your micro draws 14 amps, anything else that may be on that circuit only needs to draw 1 amp to reach the capacity of the breaker.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well mine is fixed, it began tripping often then wouldnt reset.
So I used a spare breaker and all is well, a 15 minute fix mostly moving stuff to get to the main panel..........
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 5, 10:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

12/3 (forget 14/n for this application) is about 60% more but it's still a trivial amount of money compared to the labor of adding another circuit.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 Aug 2010 12:47:23 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Current code requires split receptacles on the countertop - at least here in Kitchener/Waterloo Ontario. Adding a dedicated line to the microwave won't give you that - while adding the split will give you a "dedicated" line for the microwave (which is allowed, I believe, to also service the gas oven)

It is a duplex receptacle that has been fed with a 3 wire 220 volt feed, split to 2 110 volt (nominal - I know, generally 230 and 115, but that's just semantics) circuits - also referred to by some on the group as an "edison" circuit, I believe.

The microwave and oven are permanetly (more or less) in one place, and generally not within teach of the sink or water taps, whereas the countertop receptacles can feet things like portable mixers etc that can get within reach of the sink - where you could hold a (leaky) appliance in one hand and touch the sink or tap with the other. Without a GFCI you could get a nasty shock. With a GFCI the breaker will trip and you usually will not even get a tickle.

likely that it is defective, given the scenario described. What make panel do you have? Certain brands are much more succeptible to failure.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the fridge is not on your breaker then I'm leaning towards a weak breaker. Have you figured out what else is on that circuit? Turn it off and check everything; all the outlets in the kitchen and adjacent rooms. If the fridge is on a different circuit then you may be able to manage your usage to avoid the problem. Don't turn on other things on that circuit while you are microwaving. A few lights won't matter.
If you do decide to add a dedicated circuit for the microwave you should be able to do that without messing around with the rest of the existing wiring.
However adding the gfci capability is often easy. It's just a matter of figuring out which outlet in the kitchen is first on the chain of outlets from the box. That outlet would be replaced with a gfci outlet. Even if the kitchen has two circuits in it you simply will need 2 gfci outlets.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 1 Aug 2010 21:50:18 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

in the panel. If you did, you would know because it has a test button (generally, anyways)
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/31/2010 11:48 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

how does it "cover the microwave and regular oven"? And yes, you could have a weak breaker. Replacing it is the first step to solving the problem. (especially if this hasn't always happened).
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Higgs the troll. Plonk.
Joe
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Higgs Boson wrote:

Count how long it takes the wheel on the power meter to go around. Turn on the suspect appliance. Count the wheel again. Calculate the load difference.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/31/2010 11:48 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

I'm in the process of rebuilding a refrigeration unit in a restaurant right now and I'm having to replace the plug, outlet and some other wiring because it got toasted. The plug got wet and the connection got worse over time because of the heat produced. It's a destructive cycle that happens over time until the wiring is destroyed or equipment stops running. When the voltage drops, the current goes up and heat is produced at the point of every marginal connection and there can be more than one. The spring tension of the electrical outlet contacts is one of the first things destroyed by heat and that leads to a problem connection which can cascade from there by burning up the plug and cord. The Mark-1 eyeball and SM-3-b nose are often the only tools needed to detect the damaged components.
In a home kitchen, folks often spray cleaner on a wall to wipe off splatters and such. The spray often gets into the electrical outlets and onto the plugs which can cause corrosion. The spray can run down the wall and get into the outlet even if there is a plug in it.
TDD
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.