One circuit 125V, others 117V, why?

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On Sat, 26 Dec 2015 04:31:04 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

With higher voltage on one circuit the current draw may also be different - depending on the load involved.
A motor would likely (or at least possibly) draw less at the higher voltage, while a resistive load would draw more
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On 12/25/2015 9:31 PM, IGot2P wrote:
We can solve this through the process of elimination, Is there an Amish heater on the same circuit?, push 1 for yes or 2 for No If you selected 1, unplug the Amish heater and set it by the curb If you selected 2, unplug the Amish heater and set it by the curb
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On 12/25/2015 10:31 PM, IGot2P wrote:

Forget the jack-leg hacks, a 23 amp tool needs a proper circuit. Upgrade your system to meet all NEC regulations. (This will keep your fire and casuality company happy.)
Do it right. Run a new circuit with a 30 amp breaker, #10 copper and use a 30 amp receptacle.
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Call your power company and have them check the service drop to your house. A bad connection could cause some voltage drop.
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Did you install a double-pole breaker and run four wires to the subpanel for 240volts?
Or is this a single pole breaker, three wires, and only 120volts available at the subpanel?

If you know the device is drawing more than 20amps, you should really install 10 gauge wire and a 30amp breaker. Just because the breaker isn't tripping doesn't mean it is safe to do.
That said, things with motors often use a lot more power when they first start up, but the draw drops once the motor is running. Startup current usually won't trip a breaker and won't cause any harm since it's a short duration.

The first breaker is probably defective, allowing you to draw more current than it is supposed to.

You have a voltage drop somewhere. Unplug everything and check the voltages again. You may have something else loading down the other circuits.
If you still see the voltage difference, open up the breaker panel and measure the voltages there. If they're all the same, you probably have a bad connection somewhere between the panel and outlets.
If it's a 240 volt panel (two hot leads coming in), check both halves of the panel. If the voltages are different between the two phases, the problem lies somewhere between the main panel and the subpanel. Could be the connections, could be the 100amp breaker back at the main panel, could be the wiring between the two.
Check the voltages back at the main panel to see if they are the same there. If the voltage is signficantly different on the two hot leads coming into your main panel, you should call your power company.
Good luck,
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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