? on sewer snakes...


How large in diameter is the coil on the end of the large sewer snakes they use to clear the main sewer lines, when necessary?
Just wondering. We had to get a cleanout installed, and the reinforced concrete pipe they put in place is about two feet long, with a hole in the cast iron pipe it sets on that is only a couple inches across. I am wanting to build a guide to use for pointing the snake in the desired direction, so no guessing is needed to figure out which way it is headed. Thinking that might come in handy if the cleanout pipe is full of stuff from the cloggged line.
Thanks,
Dave
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Best call city hall and ask them.
Joe
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All of these numbers are for a machine you would use to clean a main line. All of these parts are made in smaller sizes for smaller lines.
The cork-screw type sold with the drain machines is about 2". The blade type used by the drain services is a U-shaped affair about 2.5" at the base.
There are also some solid metal auger points out there that are only a 1-1.5" across that are used for house lines. IMO these are the least effective.
Anyone with minimum experience can make the snake go the way they want based on how they insert the cable.
--
Colbyt
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The "rooter" guys I have seen just use the spring end and it is only about an inch across. They are snagging tampons most of the time tho. If they are really going after roots in the line they use a cutter that is close to the size of the pipe. My snake (Harbor Fright) cane with several different heads.
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You use a cutter head to clean out a main sewer line not a coil head. Please elaborate on what you mean by with a hole in the cast iron pipe it sets on that is only a couple inches across I dont understand. Main sewer lines are usually 4 in diameter so you should not use anything less than 3 if you want to do a good job. Please elaborate on what you mean by build a guide to use for pointing the snake in the desired direction I dont understand. You should not have any elbows when installing a sewer line. If you have to make a turn you should use something called a sweep or turn which is basically an elbow that forms a wide arc. I wouldnt worry about the clean-out line being full of stuff from the clogged line but would worry about what stuff you have after the clean out line if I were you.
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wrote:

===You use a cutter head to clean out a main sewer line not a coil head. Please elaborate on what you mean by with a hole in the cast iron pipe it sets on that is only a couple inches across I dont understand. Main sewer lines are usually 4 in diameter so you should not use anything less than 3 if you want to do a good job. Please elaborate on what you mean by build a guide to use for pointing the snake in the desired direction I dont understand. You should not have any elbows when installing a sewer line. If you have to make a turn you should use something called a sweep or turn which is basically an elbow that forms a wide arc. I wouldnt worry about the clean-out line being full of stuff from the clogged line but would worry about what stuff you have after the clean out line if I were you. === Bottom line is we had to have a cleanout installed because whoever built the house didn't put one in. So the local plumber dug down to the main line and broke a hole in the top of the cast-iron pipe, then placed a reinforced concrete pipe with lid over the hole and poured concrete around it. So there is a two foot long concrete pipe sitting on top of the main line, with a ragged hole at the bottom providing access to the main line. I am thingkng that it will not be easy to tell which direction the snake chooses to go in if the riser is full of sewege, and want to build a tool made of PVC that has 45 degree couplings on each end, that can be lowered into the cleanout pipe to nudge the snake in the desired direction. Hope this is a little more clear. I am wondering how big the PVC pipe and couplings need to be to handle a coil end, which is what the last guy who was out here used. Am thinking I need to use 2.5 inch pipe and couplings. Will have to try it and see how it works... The 45 degree couplings for the three inch PVC pipe are two large to fit in the 4 inch hole of the cleanout.
Thanks for the help.
Dave
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Dave wrote:

I think he should have put the cleanout at an angle. And if the cleanout is to go both directions, install 2.
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He was supposed to cut out a section of the cast iron pipe and install this
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
in its place. He didnt because he didnt want to kill several hours cutting cast iron which can be a b since he couldnt use a chain type cutter because its an old pipe.
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On Thu, 1 Jul 2010 21:41:39 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

Side grinder with a metal cutting wheel. 5 minute job.
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