old water spot on sheetrock

Page 1 of 2  
I want to use Kiln on the sheetrock where an old (now dry) water spot was. It's brown and slightly black spots in a small area of the sheetrock. I was thinking to either apply 2 or 3 coats of kiln before the correct matching paint or perhaps a little bleach on the spot and allowed to dry before applying kiln. I might also lightly sand the wall before either method. Which method do you think I should consider to do?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/3/2012 9:06 AM, Doug wrote:

That, I would presume wouldn't be a kiln but the brand name "Kilz"...
Why not follow the recommendations on the can?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok, good idea. And yes, my mistake... should be Kilz !!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I believe I've seen kilz in spray cans. For a small spot like yours, just get one of them rather than a whole gallon. Then follow the directions. You could probably also use gray auto primer in a spray can. it's oil based so it will likely cover the spot, and only costs a buck at Walmart or the dollar stores. It's a light gray color so latex wall paint should cover it easy enough. BE SURE it's well dry first, like let it sit a few days.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 13:14:32 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

So not to be repetitive, see my later posts but thanks!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You mean KILZ, I believe. I would wipe the surface with pure household/laundry bleach on a rag, and then allow it to dry for at least 24 hours before painting. A hair dryer could speed up the bleach drying process if you are in a hurry. Then follow the instructions that are on the paint can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 3 Jan 2012 07:44:03 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

Thank you. And yes, my mistake... I should have written Kilz.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/3/2012 10:06 AM, Doug wrote:

It's been my experience that, once wet, sheetrock becomes soft and powdery. Might be a good idea to dig it out and patch. Wiping the entire surface with mild solution of cleaner and/or bleach should not hurt...Kilz is a brand, not a specific primer. Any quality primer should work just fine if used according to label.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I will consider this as a last option. The wet ... actually damp spot is the size of a quarter and tho it's taking a LONG time to fully dry, I would rather give it the time to dry. So far, the sheetrock seems firm even in that remaining spot but maybe if I pushed really hard in that small spot, it might collapse, dunno but I'd rather not do that at this time. I think(??) that with enough time it will dry tho I'm beginning to use a hair dryer to help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/3/2012 1:27 PM, Doug wrote:

Seems odd to have a spot that size that takes a long time to dry...I assume you know the source of the moisture and it is corrected?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Agreed and yes and yes. Roof vent pipe leak and repaired. Has not rained since repair so spot should dry. Of course I don't really know if the leak is repaired for sure until next rain but since it has not rained, the spot should dry. I'd really like it to dry so I can paint it before next rain so I know leak is fixed tho I can go back in attic to check like I did the first time.
I'm going to keep your idea in the back of my head as the last resort. Hopefully I won't have to do that but I appreciate your idea in case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Use a kiln? To assist with the drying?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

at this time. I think(??) that with enough time it will dry tho I'm beginning to use a hair dryer to help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Somewhat true. It is a brand name, but . . . Most latex primers will allow stains and wood knots to bleed through. Unlike regular primers, Kilz has 10 different types, both oil and latex based and can block stains far better than regular primer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/3/2012 9:53 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I think most of the major brands have "stain blocking" primers. I'm just sayin'.....one important factoid is that they still require the clean, dry, dust-free surface that reg. paint does. Some folks think "Kilz" has magic powers and just slap it onto peeling paint or dirty surfaces.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug wrote:

Clean the area with a wall cleaner (TSP substitute).
When you paint over Kilz (or any other glossy primer/sealer) the paint will have a different sheen than the other areas of the wall. If you want a good match, clean, Kilz, and repaint the entire wall. If that's not a concern, go ahead and wash, kilz, and paint the stained area. You can always go back and re-prime and paint if it doesn't turn out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Black spots are probably mold/mildew and are below the surface where bleach doesn't get to it. I would cut it out since sheet rock is neither difficult or expensive to replace. Cutting it out from stud to stud is probably the easiest way to go. This will also give you a chance to inspect insulation and for other damage.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I had black stuff due to mold, and I thought that bleach would turn it white. The chlorine bleach killled the mold, but didn't have any effect on the color, and that's when I realized nothing said it would.
I don't know if you have mold of course, but you also don't have a cotton or cashmere sweater there.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Repeated tries had no effect on the color. I learn slow.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug,
I recently tried the latex Kilz and it didn't cover very well. Even after three coats. Try the oil-based or another brand.
dss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

dss, I originally had a spray can of Kilz but it's oil based. I realized that after the Kilz paint is on the wall, I want to match the color of the wall. However the touch up paint I already have for this, is a latex paint so I bought a few days ago a can of Latex Kilz to use instead of the spray can. I will remember your advice just in case tho. Thank you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.