Old Sears, Roebuck & Co. table saw


Model # 113.27520 with matching stand. Weighs a ton. Looked it up at Sears parts direct and the only parts they have are bolts and washers, and a newer miter gauge that will work (I suppose many will work). I was surprised it showed a parts diagram at all!
It is missing the motor and maybe part of the motor mount but I can make a mount. It is also missing the rip fence and the miter gauge but Sears has a replacement for the miter gauge. I'm not sure how difficult it would be to make, or adapt a rip fence. Looks like the original had a geared lever to turn since in the front it has teeth along the bottom.
I've been using it as a table top and a grinder stand. Is it worth getting it up and running again? I have a Ryobi BTS20 that my BIL gave me and I don't do a lot of precise work, in fact I don't do much work at all ;-) For sure I won't toss it out but not sure if it's worth putting the money and time into it.
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I have pretty much that saw, with all the parts, in working order. I inherited it from my father who was a cabinet maker, .Ii use it just enough to keep the rust dowm on the table top, not enough to be any sort of expert. I found these pictures on the web, mine has the rolling sheet metal base, but otherwise similar. The fence slides on mine, & clamps like the one in the photos. http://www.owwm.com/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=9728
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Were those once popular saws? I have the *exact* same saw in my garage, but without a stand. It sits on a workbench. All of the parts are there, and it works just fine. And it will cut just about anything.
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Eric in North TX wrote:

That sure looks like it except mine is copper colored, looks like original paint. And along the front is a long "rack" gear with ruler like measurements on it. I'm guessing that to move the rip fence it had a handle and gear. I don't know what else the rack gear could have been for if not part of the rip fence.
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Tony wrote:

It looks a lot like the old 9" saw my father gave me. Blades were too hard to find, which started me on the freebie 10" sears saw project. Yes, there was a knob on the bottom of the fence you turned for small adjustments.
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I had one of those but it was only 8".....cast iron table & wings...weighed a TON!
Still had the fence and motor mount & decent motor ..... too heavy for me, I have an 8" makita portable... good enough for the occasional rip.
I gave the Craftsman to a former student, he was young enough & strong enough to deal with it.
Unless the Craftsman is bigger (10" ?) than your Ryobi or you'd have fun fixing it. I'd forget fixing it & sell it on craigslist "as is" and let someone else put the time into it.
cheers Bob Bob
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wrote:

Really depends on what you plan to do with it. Not a good choice for fine furniture. Without a decent fence the saw has little value, but maybe you can make one and a few other jigs that ride in the miter slot for very little money. "Heavy" is a good thing and cast iron top is much better than a pressed metal top. Often accessories for a table saw will fit many brands, and they can become expensive.
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