Old Framing /Remodeling

I am currently remolding my bathroom in a home that is 91 yrs old. The framing in this home is in good condition, i.e. no insect or weather damage (with the exception of some water damage from a leaking shower); however the exterior walls are all framed with 2x4 construction. In an effort to create a more energy efficient home I would like to have the exterior walls framed with 2x6's but would like to keep the original faming member in place. I have thought about sistering 2x6's next to the current 2x4's but am concerned about additional weight and cost. Would it be advisable to rip down lumber and attach them to the existing framing members using adhesive and drywall screws? Or should I endure the extra cost and reinforce any structural issues I may come across?
Thanks for your advice
sk
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If all you want is to increase the insulation, why not just sister a wall to the inside (requires moving some electrical and trim changes to openings or to the outside which would requires resetting the windows.
I did one home by adding a new wall to the inside. (you also loose a little room)
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You might be forced to sister if the existing 2 x 4 framing is out of whack... If not I would not bother, the savings realized from super-insulating such a small space probably isn't worth the effort, expense, and lost floor space. Invest in high density insulation and better windows to gain R value.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote in message (sk)

Good pointsThanks for the advice.
sk

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You are going to tear out all of the wall covering on the exterior walls? If so, sistering doesn't make sense. The original 2x4 studs probably measure a full 4" whereas new 2x6s will measure 5-1/2 inches. So you just need to add 1-1/2" strips. Actually you could just rip 2x4s in the middle to give you two 1-3/4" pieces which nailed to what you have would give you nearly 6 inches. You don't need adhesive or screws, just nails. Your best bet would be to use a compressor and nail gun as hammering could cause a lot of damage. The old wood is probably pretty hard. Screws are a pretty expensive alternative. Don't forget that you need to add the strips to the top and bottom plates also. If you find places that need additional strength, sister the existing 2x4s with new 2x4s. Sounds like a lot of work. I would be tempted to just put 6" batts into the existing space (would give a higher R value that 3-1/2 insulation but less than 6" batts in a 6" space. Old houses usually have a lot of uninsulated areas and holes that fixing would be much simpler and provide a tremenous increase in efficiency, especially the areas around wall to cement and wall to roof joints.
sk wrote:

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On 20 Jan 2004 09:05:48 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (sk) wrote:

I'm not exactly sure what you're getting at. I assume you want to add extra 2x framing outside the wall to add extra insulation. If you remove the outside cladding/covering you might be able to offset the new wall to give a space of 6 inches in the cavity. This will also allow you to wind the insulation between the old and new 2x4s. But; how will the baseplate and top plate be attached to the house? Will it be waterproof? Sounds like a lot of trouble to go thru, and I don't know what the code would say.
Joe
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After removing the old interior plaster and lath I ripped a few 2x12 to strips and nailed them on the existing "2x4". Since each "2x4" was actually of different size (the lath and plaster made the walls straight) each piece had a different thickness. A laser level is quite useful here. The additional weight is minimal. Since I used wallboard instead of plaster I think that the weight after the renovation is actually lower than before.
EJ
(sk) wrote:

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(sk) wrote:

I had not planned on addressing the issue from the outside in, so there will be no removal of exterior cladding/covering. When I mentioned exterior walls I should have been clearer. The walls I planned on extending (in depth) are exterior in a since that they are the last wall before you reach outside (not sure if there is a technical term for this wall other than a load bearing wall) Anyway, I have already removed the drywall from the inside of the walls, plaster lath was previously in place but has been replaced/remodeled by a pervious home owner (if you can call what they did remodeling). I was thinking that extending the depth of the wall would be to my advantage both in a sense that I would gain added R value while at the same time evening up the face of the framing members giving me a more true service to hang drywall to. Get this, the previous carpenter/hacker used the leftover lath from the walls to try and accomplish the same goal, not so much for added R value but an effort to true up the wall. I don't know if this is a common practice but I thought it was pretty backwoods and got a good laugh out of it (not really)
I realize that my money will probably be better spent in addressing drafty windows and doors but would still like to have a nice square space to work with and am not a big fan of half assing things when I can help it. Would ripping 2x members in half and using them to shim up the uneven studs like George suggested be the best bet? I like this idea in that I would gain extra depth for insulation (which is relatively inexpensive) and even up the walls at the same time.
Am I thinking along the right lines? Or do I need to reassess the situation?
sk
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On 21 Jan 2004 15:04:11 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (sk) wrote:

Something similar was done by the previous owners of our home. It's not really too bad. Recently it was -30C outside and the walls were not cold...not warm either. They didn't seal drafts, etc before putting the new wall up. That's something you might want to consider.
Good luck Joe
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Using lath to true up the wall is not a bad thing at all. On the other hand, if you wish to add two inches to the cavity depth for insulation, then just rip some 2x2's and nail/glue them to extend the 2x4 joists. It will be strong enough for a wall. --Phil
sk wrote:

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Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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Another way to get the extra insulation is to nail 1" polyurethane foil-backed board on top of the old 2x4s. In addition to the extra R value the thermal bridges at the studs are removed and the board makes a vapor barrier as well. The downside is the cost, the need to extend all electrical boxes, the requirement to use 5/8" fire rated wall board (with all boxes sealed with fire rated silicone), and the danger of toxic fumes in case of a fire. Also, I am not sure how to deal with fire blocking in this case.
EJ
Youngstown State University

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