Old Electrical Outlet

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NM cable (Romex) was recognized in the 1926 NEC
wrote:

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Here's three pictures I have of mine. I had untaped these splices because I was curious to see if they were soldered. They were not.
http://www.katva.org/images/elect039.jpg
http://www.katva.org/images/elect038.jpg
http://www.katva.org/images/elect037.jpg
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That's enough to make your blood run cold.
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Yes, it's been very interesting what they got away with for scores of years.
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I'd expect linen not asbestos.
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Steve Barker LT wrote:

I don't think asbestos could contribute to pulling strength.
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Marilyn & Bob wrote:

Yep. Back in those days steel BX was intended to prevent vermin from eating the wire insulation. A manufacturing flaw resulted in rusting between the spirals of the armor. If used as an equipment grounding conductor the impedence may very well be high enough that the fuse or breaker won't trip upon a ground-fault, resulting in a possible fire as the armor heats up. IMO, the OP would be better off installing a 2 wire receptacle or a GFCI receptacle.
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Damn Volts your good, The stuff was made in General Electric's Sprague plant. They took sheets of galvanized metal, cut them into strips, and wound it over the conductors wrapped in the cotton sheath. The problem, as Volts indicated, was that when they cut the sheets of metal into strips, the edges were left with no galvanized coating, so they oxidized

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redbrickhat wrote:

Fray out some of the cloth. Hold a match or lighter under it. If it just burns to ash, it's probably cotton. If it burns and melts to a gooey mess, it's probably plastic. If it melts to a little glob, it's probably fiberglass. If it gets orange or white hot without melting, it's probably asbestos. -- John
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or just connect your fixtures to it, close it up and be done with it!!!

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No. Rubber and cloth. By now it will probably have deteriorated and won't take a small movement. You need to replace it with modern plastic wire if you have permission.
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