Old dug well 75 feet

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I plan to fill in this well. Any particulars known? It has concrete box around it with a little roof. I intend to bust up the concrete, dump it down the well, bust up the rock base with a hole in the middle and dump it down the hole and have any number of loads of gravel dumped on the well so most if it falls down the hole and use my tractor to push in the rest with the bucket loader. Then top it off with loam and grass seed.
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wrote:

WHY??
Fix it up, secure so no one can fall in, nice lawn ornament, and could be a lifesaver if water failed for any reason.
you could put a submersible pump down the hole and use for irrigation car washing etc etc
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It's right next the septic drainage field. I don't think it can ever be used again. It's just an irritating lawn obstacle for mowing.
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Some areas have proceedures that you must follow for sealing up an old well and only allow certain materials to be used. It is designed to prevent contamination of the water table, particularly a 75 foot deep well.
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EXT wrote:

I agree. You are using the aquifer for your other well. This well is next to your drain field. You need to protect the aquifer.
Gravel provides no protection. Sand not much protection. Clay can be a pretty good seal.
I suggest calling the state agency that regulates wells and ask for suggestions. There may also be requirements for closing wells. as EXT wrote.
--
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When they tore down some houses across the street from where I live, each house still had its original well. As the construction company started working on their lots they pumped out as much water as the could and filled the well with something out of a ready mix concrete truck. Probably a very low psi mix that would just plug up the hole by hardening without a great deal of strength, but that is just my guess, as I did not ask, just observed.
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the easiest thing to do is cut grass around the existing well.
gravel is a bad idea a friend had a well, nearby construction used tons of gravel which contaminated and ruined his water supply......
construction company had to pay for connection to city water and water bill for 5 years.
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I checked with my brother who sells the stuff for shutting down a well, They either cap them and/ or fill them with bentonite(sp) clay. Most just cap them off. You may have to get a permit to do this and have it inspected.
Jimmie
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote:

Bentonite is used because it expands, increasing the effectiveness of the seal.
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didnt betonite used to contain asbestos??
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Still too retarded to remove the retarded artifacts of your retarded newsreader?

I doubt it. Bentonite is used several ways in well drilling. One of them is "mud drilling" where, when drilling in dirt, a thin bentonite mix is pumped down the drill shaft. The bentonite spreads into the dirt and stabilizes it. The mix also returns cuttings to the surface.
--
bud--

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I'd really suggest leaving it there. You may have to dig up the leach field some later time, and it may be to advantage to put the leach field some where else. Have the water tested. It may be just fine, if it's drawing well below the leach field.
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On Fri, 23 Oct 2009 15:20:02 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Don't need it, I have a drilled well on other side of lot.
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My cousin used the one on the family farm for geothermal HVAC but if you are bent on filling it I suggest you consult your local authority on this one. Filling one can be as complicated as drilling one.. When I livedin Ga it was not uncommon for people to cap them. This meant digging down for about 2 ft and a foot out from the edged of the well and pouring a concrete cap. Im not sure how think they were but I think I remember 12 inches was not too unreasonable.
Jimmie
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wrote:

It seems like filling it with gravel is an expensive overkill. Dirt came out of it and dirt could refill it. Yeah, you'll have some settling over a period of time, but you can just add more dirt.
Whatever you use, be sure they don't drive that much weight over your septic field.
KC
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I'd start with the sand/gravel. [creek run would be my choice- it is cheap & flows nicely.]
You could dump a few big chunks of concrete down there that get lodged 1/2 way & you'd either not know about it, or you'd have a bitch of a time clearing it.
Fill it to where you can see what you're doing- then put its own chunks in. [that will also make it easier to reach the mouth of the well while filling.]
Jim
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On Fri, 23 Oct 2009 10:39:27 -0400, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Totally agree there. I've been to a lot of old underground military sites; standard practice post-WWII was to smash the above-ground entrances and throw the bits into the hole, then fill over with dirt. After 30 or more years the dirt's migrated through and they've all opened up again...
The only way to sort anything like this out is to completely fill it with smaller particles (dirt, gravel, whatever) and expect it to keep settling for a few years and needing more packing.
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Save the gravel. I can think of a whole lot of politicians that I'd want to throw down there instead...
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But then you have to worry about poisoning the water table.
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On Fri, 23 Oct 2009 12:14:39 -0400, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Plus they'd decompose and the ground would sink. Maybe encase them in concrete first?
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