Old dishwasher won't fill

I have an ancient (circa 1972) GE/Hotpoint dishwasher that hasn't been used in some time. Today I decided to give it a test run, and found that everything appears to work except the water inlet valve. No water flows.
I've confirmed that the water level switch is working properly, But when I disconnect the two leads going to the valve, I don't measure any voltage across them when the valve should be ON. But I don't know what I'm supposed to get - AC or DC, and what voltage. I assume it's 110V AC, but don't know for sure.
Of course this is a totally mechanical device which is controlled by a massive timer/switch box which I assume has internal cams that cycle things on and off. The valve should be turned on at least three times during the total cycle, but doesn't turn on at all.
So, before I try to take the timer apart, I'd like to be sure it isn't the inlet valve. As a test, can I carefully power up the valve with 110V AC just to make sure it works? I measure about 600 ohms across the valve coil, so I assume it's good, but need to make sure.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Dishwasher Model GHDA650B03 Timer Model WD21X5106
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Peabody wrote:

Hi, The door interlock switch is part of the circuit. I am sure diagram is on the panel of the unit. Inlet valve solenoid is 120V AC driven like one in the laundry washer. Solenoid makes faint hum when power is applied. Bad timer used to be rebuilt at the parts store but I don't know if they still do.
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As Tony mentions the door interlock switch is part of the fill valve power circuit. You can test whether it's good or bad with an ohm meter.
To verify valve & timer function you could "jump" the interlock switch and see if you can get the fill valve to work.
You can also test the fill valve with plug cord with spade connectors on it. Remove wiring to valve, attach spade connector on cord to valve, plug cord in... if the valve is ok, water will flow.
Fill valve solenoid is 120 VAC.
cheers Bob
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DD_BobK says...
> As Tony mentions the door interlock switch is part of > the fill valve power circuit. You can test whether it's > good or bad with an ohm meter.
> To verify valve & timer function you could "jump" the > interlock switch and see if you can get the fill valve > to work.
> You can also test the fill valve with plug cord with > spade connectors on it. Remove wiring to valve, attach > spade connector on cord to valve, plug cord in... if the > valve is ok, water will flow.
> Fill valve solenoid is 120 VAC.
I've done some further testing. I've confirmed that I do get 120VAC to the leads powering the valve when the valve is supposed to be turned on. I didn't get that result before because I was measuring at the wrong time.
I've also confirmed that there is continuity through the coil, at 600 ohms.
However, I very carefully applied 120VAC from a power cord directly to the valve spade leads, as suggested above, but nothing moves.
So, it appears the coil is ok, but the innards of the valve are frozen. That's probably because the dishwasher hadn't been run in quite a while.
In any case, it appears the problem is definitely in the valve, not the timer. Fortunately, because the valve is easily replaceable, and the timer isn't.
Onve I have removed the valve, I may try to un-freeze it, but I suspect in the end it will make more sense to just replace it.
Thanks for everybody's help.
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Fill valves fail often, for dishwashers and ice makers in fridges
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"Peabody" wrote in message
DD_BobK says...

I've done some further testing. I've confirmed that I do get 120VAC to the leads powering the valve when the valve is supposed to be turned on. I didn't get that result before because I was measuring at the wrong time.
I've also confirmed that there is continuity through the coil, at 600 ohms.
However, I very carefully applied 120VAC from a power cord directly to the valve spade leads, as suggested above, but nothing moves.
So, it appears the coil is ok, but the innards of the valve are frozen. That's probably because the dishwasher hadn't been run in quite a while.
In any case, it appears the problem is definitely in the valve, not the timer. Fortunately, because the valve is easily replaceable, and the timer isn't.
Onve I have removed the valve, I may try to un-freeze it, but I suspect in the end it will make more sense to just replace it.
Thanks for everybody's help.
The valve has a metal plunger that is spring loaded. This plugs the center hole in the rubber disk. Plunger is most likely stuck with rust or corrosion. Take valve apart and soak the inter parts with CLR. Also check the very small hole at the edge of the rubber part as if that is plugged the water will not shut OFF when the rest is OK. WW
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SNIP

I've "fixed" fill valves (temporarily) by tapping (smacking) with small hammer while activated. But I figured if they could stick closed, they could stick open as well. :(
So even if they worked again, I replaced them. The cost of "fail open" was too high.
http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Water-Inlet-Valve/WD15X93/3310?modelNumber=GHDA650B-03
cheers Bob
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