OK to paint outside when overnight temps below freezing?

I have a few small areas to paint. I can do them during the day when it's > 40F, but overnight it will drop below freezing. Is that a problem? Do I just need to wait until spring?
I have a small bit of siding on a dormer and a bit of trim. I can easily get it painted in 40F and it will have a few hours to dry, but 6 to 8 hours later it's likely to drop below freezing.
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I frequently make use of a hair dryer.
Greg
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is it on a suth-facing wall, does it get any sun to help it dry?
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your better off waiting till spring, next time paint before fall........
adhesion will be better in warm weather
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What does the paint can label say? Most of mine suggest minimum teperatures for application.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
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answers to questions..
-- the dormer side is facing south and the dormer front facing west, so both will get sun through 4pm or so -- generally fall here is the best time to paint - Sep-mid Nov. More rain in the spring and summers can be hot (85-100) and humid (50+) -- BM Moorgard -- 40F minimum
I'm going to call it quits until spring for all other parts of the house, but was wondering about that south and west side of the dormer and a bit of fascia. It's been washed and caulked. Some of that may need to get redone if I don't paint now. Painting would take about an hour. After that area I need to wash and prep the other areas, so there's no chance to paint until spring. I do have a fair bit of fascia that also could be painted, but other than than newly primed fascia and door trim on the shop, it too an wait. But I don't want to redo all this if temperature is going to be an issue.
While we are here -- what caulk do folks use? I've been using DAP ALEX plus (the silicone additive latex)
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I sent an email off to BM -- we'll see if they respond. I'll post their answer here.
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On Wed, 30 Nov 2011 10:11:41 -0800 (PST), kansascats

You'll be fine with Aura, Regal Select, or Ben. All the newer paints with the Gennex pigment system are fast drying. Start as early in the day as you can after the surface temp is at least 40 degrees.
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From BM..
As long as you follow the guidelines provided in my first missive, you should be fine. Wait until the Spring time would be my advice.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thank you -- so then would painting at 45F from 11am to 2pm, and then the temps dropping down to say 30F by midnight be a problem?
By 11am, I'm assuming all the morning dew is gone. The temps from 11am to 2pm woud be > 40F. By 5pm, sundown, the temps would still be 40F, but then it would drop off and go below freezing by early AM.
Again -- this is just for a few small locations on exterior siding and trim.
----- Original Message -----
Thank you for visiting The Benjamin Moore website.
In general, weather conditions will affect the performance and working qualities of most exterior primers and house paint coatings. Always apply our low temperature paint in fair, dry weather with temperatures between 40 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Wait until the morning dew has evaporated and stop painting before evening dampness sets in. Don't paint when its windy or dusty, particularly if you're using a slow- drying, solvent-based paint. All surfaces to be painted should be allowed to thoroughly dry before attempting to paint. After rain, allow 48 hours for the surfaces to dry before applying a paint coating system.
Ambient and surface temperatures, humidity levels and air movement all contribute to the drying of a paint resin. As well, the thickness of the freshly applied paint coating and the porosity of the surface will also have an impact on the amount of time required for an alkyd/oil based paint to set up or dry to touch. The first 4 hours of the dry time is the most critical. Avoid painting in threatening weathera shower can ruin a fresh coat of paint. Benjamin Moore recommends waiting until weather conditions improve before you begin painting.
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Once applied, all the cold will do is slow the curing of the paint.
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On Mon, 5 Dec 2011 09:15:26 -0800 (PST), kansascats

No problem. The specified paints would be long dry by then.
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