ok to move refrigerator in workshop ?

Happy new year everyone !
I'm planning to buy a new refrigerator and would like to move the old one into the workshop. The workshop is somehow insulated but it can get quite hot in there in the summer (probably around 77), and pretty cold in the winter (around 5 I'd say) since we only heat with a wood stove when we plan to spend a few hours in there.
Will I end up waisting this still good refrigerator placing it in the workshop ?
Thanks for you thoughts :)
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"The workshop is somehow insulated but it can get quite hot in there in the summer (probably around 77), and pretty cold in the winter (around 5 I'd say) since we only heat with a wood stove when we plan to spend a few hours in there. " I presume you meant 97 and 5 fahrenheit. it'll be great when it's warm, but you'll need to turn it off when the temperature drops. 32 is borderline. i start cleaning mine out around 40 and let it drip dry before it can freeze. ...thehick.
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My best friend has his old fridge under the front porch room. its unheated.
in pittsburgh temp tops out about 90 in the summer and zero in the winter. its never caused a problem. basement moderates temp. maybe 25 in winter and 70ish in summer
in cold weather fridge never runs.
although its OLD.... like 25 years so a newer high efficency model might have issues
he wondered too, but no laughs, since in the winter its electric bill for fridge is zero/
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I have a "beer fridge" in the (unheated) garage and it's been in there for 6 years now and the only problem I have had is keeping it filled....
;-]
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The reason I mentioned turning it off in the winter is that my fridge melts when the outside temperature gets low. Here's a little more info from:
http://michaelbluejay.com/electricity/refrigerators.html
"Can I save energy by putting my refrigerator or freezer outside in the winter? -- Marty Siller, Oct. 2004
You can put your freezer outside as long as the temperature is usually above 0 degrees F. You can't put your fridge outside, though. Well, you can, but your food will spoil. When the ambient temperature is too low your fridge gets confused and so it doesn't run the compressor as long as it should. That means that the temperature inside the fridge winds up being too warm. A General Electric manual I just checked said not to run the fridge when the ambient temperature is below 60 degrees F."
You could just keep an eye on it and be careful that if it does melt everything, it won't hurt anything. ...thehick
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This really only affects the freezer part. As long as the ambient satisfies the 40f or so fridge stat it won't run so the freezer ends up at 40 too.
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My new sears says dont use in a room below 50f, old friges may be better but oil gets thick. Insulate it with foam insulation sheets, ive never seen a frige insulated enough it will help in summer alot. I even recessed my new unit into a foam enclosure, I got the most efficient sears 19.5 cu ft with coil underneath so foam helps alot.
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97 degrees is to hot, It probably will still work but if you have no air circulation in the room such as a fan pulling hot air out and cool air coming in the room, heat will build up from the fridge. and it will also draw more juice at such warm temps. and in time take out the compressor. and as to winter if it only gets down to 32 you wont have a problem.
--
hiebs
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geicko wrote:

Sure its ok. Are you planning on running it? If so you might want to stop running it when the temperatures climb and definitely stop when the temperatures drop below 40. Do you really need another refrigerator? Check the cost for running that refrigerator for a year and see how much extra food you could buy? Running an appliance just because it will run doesn't make much sense. I've seen people do this when with just a bit of reorganization they could get all the stuff in the unit in the kitchen which would also reduce the cost of running the one kitchen. Donate the thing to a charity, or just move it to the workshop and store stuff in it (not running).
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Thanks everyone for your replies.
That second fridge would probably be used as a beer & beverage fridge when friends come over. It is not an OLD fridge, probably about 5-8 years old (came with that new house we bought), so what I understand is that it shouldn't be a problem to leave it in the workshop and only plug it when needed in the summer (hottest we get here really is around 77) or warm winter days when temp is over 32, right ?
By the way, workshop electricity bills are anoying... last 2 months cost 1.20$ (great !) but adding fixed network monthly costs and taxes, it ends up being a 30$ bill.... but that's another story ;-)
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If you don't need ice, you might unplug it from Halloween to Easter and use a 100 W bulb and socket plugged into a Thermocube in a lower drawer to avoid freezing beverages.
http://www.countrysupply.com/products/sku-BEW19.html
Nick
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