Ok to lay a gas stove on it's back?

I might need to do this to unload a gas stove. I didn't know if there was anything prohibitive about laying one on its back for a short time. Seems as long as the loose pieces are removed (burner grates, stove top and oven racks) then it should be ok.
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Hi hank Yes it's Ok to lay it on its back but get it install by licenced tradesman. regards Blue
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Thanks Blue. May I ask why you say to have it installed professionally? I'll just be putting the new one in where the old one was. I thought it would be just a matter of turning off the gas valve as it comes out of the wall.
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Mar 2006 07:48:04 GMT, hank wrote:

First, you can't count on the gas piping lining up exactly between the new and the old stove. Frequently, some pipe has to be added, subtracted, or moved.
Second, it may be illegal in your area to install a gas stove yourself. It certainly is illegal here in Massachusetts. In MA, a gas stove (or any other gas appliance) must be installed by a licensed gas fitter. A permit must be pulled, and the installation is inspected afterwards.
--
Seth Goodman

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In most cases, that is all there is to it. It may also have a different connection and/or location and require some re-piping. I don't know you skill level so I can't say you should or should not do it. Local codes may be a factor also. IMO, if you know what you are doing, it is a simple enough task. If you don't know what you are doing, gas can be a danger if fittings leak.
Leaks is the big problem. It is not enough to just check the connection you made, others on the line that may have been twisted or turned while you were working must also be checked.
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oven racks. Also, you can probably tape, with good tape, the stove top. Removing it is difficult because it is attached in the back in most or all cases. It hinges up for access but even in the old days I don't think it was easy to take off. You can try, but bring some tape with you.
OTOH, afaik it's not enough to take off the burner grates. Admittedly the last gas stove I had would be40 years old now, but I don't think they've changed, and you might not realize how easy the entire burners come off. Just lift the round part where the pot goes. (I don't think sparker ignitors make this any harder, but I haven't tried one.) They go back on easily too, but you should keep track of which was which. There are definitely differences in all 4 I think. And there may be some loose little parts around the pilot(s). Maybe not in most cases, but I have a vagure recollection that I had that once. Of course most pilots aren't the same anymore as mine was, but I would look around.
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