Oiling a Floor?

I have variable width, wide pine floors and I recently removed old carpet and sanded the floors in one room with relatively low foot traffic. I am new to floor refinishing, and was curious if my idea that follows would work:
I was thinking of oiling the floor in this one room as an experiment to see if it looks good, maybe using tongue oil (but I am not sure which oil to use). What I want to know is:
1) Will oiling a floor cause any problems down the line if I ultimately decide to polyurethane the floor? In other words, will the oil interfere with polyurethane if I poly the floor in say a year?
2) What is the best sort of oil to use for a floor, and if I do use an oil, is oil enough, or do I need to cover the floor insomething after (like wax)?
The reason I want to try something else before polyurethane is that I don't completely like the look of polyurethane given it is so shiny...
I'd appreciate any ideas.
Rob
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I've seen these floors in person and they are very rich looking http://www.velvitoil.com/Floors.htm
http://www.velvitoil.com/velvitoilinfosheet.htm
http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12214.shtml OIL FINISHES
Most penetrating oil sealers/finishers are combinations of highly modified natural oil, such as linseed or tung oil, with additives to improve hardness and drying. Adding wax to oil-finished floor will afford protection against spills and abrasion, although the manufacturers of some finishes such as Velvit oil maintain that their products do not require wax.
a.. ADVANTAGES: Easy to apply and repair (just brush or rub on another coat). Good durability. Will not crack, craze or peel. Low luster - popular with installers and users of traditional softwood flooring. b.. DISADVANTAGES: Not as durable as other finishes. Can take a long time to completely cure. Surface may collect dust. Can water-spot. Some finishes require waxing. Strong initial odor. Combustible.
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Try satin poly a lower sheen, But go to a real Paint store that has different brands, sheen levels vary from manufacturers. P&L has a true lower sheen satin, but many are really semi gloss , or try pints if possible. Or get technical and ask for the sheen level, everything is rated, but you wont get that info unless you research the tech data. Look hard enough you might find flat poly. Poly can also be buffed down. Talk to a real floor pro they know.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Very good information.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Oil and polyurathane are typicly compatible. I use Boiled Linseed oil on furniture and top-coat with other finishes frequently. I do not know how it will do on floors.
The other posts, so far, are also right on the mark.

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I would avoid oil on a floor as you will track it all over the house. And dirt will be major problem.
Oil will darken any wood permanently so it may affect the color later. Wax on top won't help.
There are low luster poly finishes so you won't see the shine.
AMUN
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Oils do cure. Tung and Danish are made to do just that.

That is what he wants to do. Oil brings out the natural grain

True, and it can be put over oil if he wants.
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