Oil buildup in drains, preventing -Cheaper alternative to Shaklee Basic I ?

I presently use Shaklee Basic I to prevent my bathtub/shower drain from getting clogged up.
[After massaging with sesame oil, I take a shower, and if I don't pour some diluted Basic I into the drain after showering....and rinse the drain out with hot water just before I use the shower the next time...the drain will clog up after about 7-to-14 showers]
I'm looking for a cheaper alternative to the Shaklee Basic I.
A friend told me that Shaklee Basic I is just a wetting agent, and that I could use a kitchen dish detergent and get the same results. I'm hesitant to try his advice, because if he's wrong, or if I don't use the detergent in the proper way or in the right concentration, it's a real pain to clean out the clogged drain.
So my questions are:
1] Is my friend right? 2] If he is, is there a particular kitchen dish detergent that is better than others? 3] What concentration/dilution should I use? 4] Any special instructions or suggestions [or alternatives]?
Thanks Bob.
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What a dumb question. Did you ever hear of Draino, give it a try, oil is for cooking, motors, lubricating metal not pipe enemas
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Wow...sorry I didn't make myself clear:
After doing an sesame oil massage each morning, I get in the shower and use a regular bar of hand soap [and regular shampoo] to shower in the normal manner. Then, once I'm out of the shower, I put two teaspoons of Shaklee Basic I into a gallon of warm water and slowly pour this down the drain. Then I let that sit in the drain until I take my next shower [that night, or the next morning]. [Before I take that next shower, I make sure to run hot water down the drain for about 30 seconds.]
So... I'm not looking for something like Draino to unclog a clogged drain, but rather, something cheaper that will prevent the clogging to occur [Basic I works fine, but it's sort of expensive]
If I can get the same results by putting two teaspoons of dish detergent into a gallon of water and putting that down the drain after I've finished my shower and I'm out of the shower, I'll consider doing that.
Sorry for the confusion.
Bob.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I wonder if you would not get the same effect from using nothing at all. I am sure the Shaklee product works for Shaklee and for the salesperson who informed you of the problems you did not know you had.
In any case, I am not at all sure you need any product. It is amazing how we all survived so long without all the products that are available today.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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I may get blasted for this, but what a ripoff Shaklee is! I know because i fell for it (20-some years ago?) and even sold it for about a year. Couldn't understand why friends ran when I came around. You'd think I was selling term life or something....
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NH3 and hot water might do the same job. Pour in the Ammonia and then the hot water.
I use 1/2 quart down each drain every month. I use a bowl full of water in the sinks and pour in in before I use the tub.
I get my NH3 from the 99 cent store.
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Ammonia, that's good.
If you go with dish soap remember to get the Dishwasher detergent not the stuff for the sink. Dishwasher detergent has enzymes that break down grease (oil). Laundry detergent would have similar components. My new spa tub recommends cleaning with dishwasher detergent periodically to get body oils out of the works and says never use any oil based products with the bath.
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RE: "I wonder if you would not get the same effect from using nothing at all. " :
Actually, I've tried a number of times not doing anything, and without fail, the drain always cloggs up. But you have to realize, I'm not talking about an occasional shower to remove some sesame oil. I give myself full-body oil massages every morning when I wake up, so there's a lot of oil that can build up.
Thanks, everyone, for your input and comments. I'll try some of the ideas you've suggested.
Bob
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use what appears to be (from reading a Shaklee supplier's site) a biodegradable wetting agent, which in normal use, is mixed/diluted with water! Might be better to flush something caustic (or dish detergent) down the drain, mixed with water?
For info. We used dish detergent for some 15 years on a regular basis for washing hair, while taking a shower. Best was usually the cheapest and least scented; avoiding anything with an extreme colour that might have contained dyes (Dyes bad for the environment anyway!).
More recently we have used the cheapest white soap we could find; we stopped using a popular brand because what we had thought was staining due to our copper water pipes, was actually the green colour from that particular brand of soap! The colour was probably unnecessary anyway? No blockages!
Soap itself is a pretty basic and ancient product comprising some form of animal/fish or mineral grease/oil/fat prepared with lye (caustic soda). One form of caustic soda being from wood ash, the same ash that can be used as fertilizer; again a fairly natural by-product! In many world wide rural communities preparation of soap from available sources of raw materials was just one of many domestic chores; no more than 100 years ago. I wasn't surprised when my late wife mentioned that her mother made soap for her family in the early years of the last century (1910 - 1920 etc.) in rural Atlantic Canada and even though I grew up in an industrialized country I knew the what the soap-making process entailed.
Great people those rural homemakers!
Today it's buy the most advertised or fashionably 'greenest' brand of overpriced concoctions popular at the moment! Bah humbug!
BTW ten bars of soap for $1.69 (which recently jumped in price to $1.99!) can be used for hair washing also, consistently available at local supermarket. No scent and seemingly no dyes and leaves minimum scum etc? Single person uses about one bar every week to two weeks and then uses the remaining slivers for hand washing. The best soap for hair washing used to be that old hard yellow bar soap once used for washing floors etc.
Terry
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