off topic: new car advice for senior

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On 10/12/2015 01:46 PM, Robert Green wrote:

One of my favorites:
"Love this book! (I think.) I loved Bill Clinton as a president and I hope Chelsea goes far in life. She has grown up to be an amazing woman. I am basing my review on my positive thoughts about Chelsea and her father. I have not read the book yet ...."
I'm not in the middle school target audience so I'll never read the book although I sometimes dip into YA literature, but if I did the last thing I'd admit to would be judging the book by the author's father.
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wrote:

father, Pierre. Their last name and the party affiliation are the same - but not a lot more. (Canadian politics - federal election a week from today)
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On 10/12/2015 9:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Or, George W based on George HW. One was apparently an intelligent individual!
(I guess that speaks to the fallibility of genetics!)
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On 10/12/2015 10:57 PM, Don Y wrote:

I never had much use for the family, starting with Prescott.
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wrote:

The apple never falls far from the tree but some of them rot faster than others!
--
Bobby G.




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<stuff snipped>

It's like the US Clinton/Bush fascination. We seem to like our political dynasties and do exactly what it seems your compatriots do. Judge a son based on the father (or brother or wife, etc).
--
Bobby G.



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Yes, that's why you have to read through the reviews to determine which were written by idiots and thus can be written off. Other favorites include people who clearly bought the wrong product and those that had no idea how to install or setup up the product they are reviewing.
--
Bobby G.



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<stuff snipped>

Are you really sure you know enough about the newest iPhones to make such a statement? With 128Gb of memory, fingerprint sensors, variable pressure touch sensors and a world of peripherals I can't imagine a PDA keeping up (do people really use those anymore? - I thought they had pretty much died out with the Apple Newton <g> ?)
For what I am interested in doing next (telemedicine) I don't think very many PDAs come equipped with all the bio, motion and position sensors built into the iPhone. Plus they don't fit so easily in your pocket. I like the idea of being able to simple spec HW: "You need at least an iPhone six to run my apps" and I am done specifying. It's really just a variation of the KISS principle: "Keep It Simple, Stupid!"
The IOS software has proved to be more resilent against hacking than Windows because of the tight control Apple exercises over product design and production. Apple is the ONLY cell phone maker that makes any significant profit so they must be doing something right to keep such a powerful lead over their competitors. The secret, according the to the article I posted elsewhere, is that they are not only a status symbol, they are also incredibly functional.
If you knew how much I used to despise Apple, you'd know this is quite a change in my thinking. However it's Apple's "closed shop" that confers a lot of advantages in today's modern virus/hack ridden world.
The iPhone platform has to be one of the most stable in the world because of the control Apple exerts over design and implementation. That's important to me as a developer because I see what happens in the Windows, Android and browser world. So many variations in software, firmware, OS's, peripherals and more. In that environment a developer could spend a LOT of time just addressing all the little incompatibility quirks. Those quirks are bound to crop up in a platform comprised of so many pieces developed and built by so many different corporations and programmers.
BTDT and frankly, I want to develop new ideas, not fix someone else's problems. As they said so succinctly in Aliens: "Is this a stand-up fight or a bug-hunt?" Obviously I like the stand-up fight better.
--
Bobby G.



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<stuff snipped>

One of the neatest clone cases I had was hinged so that you could just pop open the hood to swap cards, change DIP settings, etc. One day I opened it forgetting I had a $500 Seagate 40MB drive on it which I heard sliding along the top on its way to the concrete floor. Thunk. Turn out to be not practical because it leaked a ton of RF. But the clones didn't have to be FCC certified like the real deals.

Yeah, what? (-:

Hey, that's what I've carried (unactivated, no less) for years and years. Now I think telemedicine will be taking off and the iPhone is the natural platform. There's just too much chaos in the Android phone world although it often results in progress that Apple will either have to pay, steal or litigate (are the last two really different?) to acquire.

I was scanning through the Android Apps store on Amazon looking for a good barcode scanner app and it's a little scary. Lots of bad reviews that accuse app makers of "stealing" personal data. Even the Apple Apps store got a load of bad apps. So how DO you tell which apps to trust?

For telemed apps, data security will be a very important consideration because of the various privacy laws. Oddly enough, the initial research shows a serious problem outside of anything I can do (within fiscal reason) to repair. There still is no universal data exchange possible because each and every different medical practice software package uses different data elements and names. Different field sizes, types, etc. The promise of electronic health records actually saving time and money has, IMHO, been completed thwarted by the lack of interchange standards. Initiatives are afoot, however . . . I once worked on the committee that developed the National Drug Code (NDC) because pharma companies were forever changing their formulations and packaging, partly in an effort to defraud DoD by providing what look like the same dosage, quantity and price as last time but only the price stayed the same. The other two decreased, sometimes substantially, often without adequate notice.

I hear a lot of Android users cursing at their phones. At least once a day. I don't think the iPhone is really so much better, but people who have paid that much for them have a cognitive dissonance issue going: "If I paid SO much for this damn phone, it's GOT to be good!"

I always wondered how Macs got certified but perhaps that's another hidden benefit of Apple's closed eco-system. I worked in a place where the classified PC room had active network jacks on the wall and network cards in the PC. I think the deal was as long as they were not actually connected, it was OK. It took the entire Federal data world a long time to realize that you not only have to order diskless workstations, you have to order ones without USB, network or serial ports, either. Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden explained it to them.

Oh, I'll bet if you starting banging on one, especially with an expert around to explain all the "secret squirrel" gestures and features, and you'll change your mind. I know I did when I dictated my first e-mail and it was nearly flawless. We've come a long way, baby, from the Sperry-Univac 1100 I learned to program on. It was liquid cooled, IIRC and was about 1/000 the machine an iPhone is, computing-wise.
--
Bobby G.



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On Fri, 9 Oct 2015 13:08:17 -0400, "Robert Green"

Actually, by law they did. Just another law that was selectively ignored.

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<stuff snipped>

The loophole, IIRC, was that I was buying parts and assembling them, and using them myself, not selling them to end-users as completed machines. So I wasn't technically breaking the law. At least that's what my vendor said when I asked him why he sold only components, not finished machines.
I always had to have at least three machines up and running when I was developing and testing software so I was always building the latest and greatest. I still have most of them lining a wall in the basement. It was interesting to watch the industry mature. Eventually the holes in cases actually lined up with the holes in the motherboards.
--
Bobby G.



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On Fri, 9 Oct 2015 21:41:01 -0400, "Robert Green"

So did the power supply, and the motherboard, and the hard drive controller, and the video card, etc.
And even a system assembled from ALL fcc certified parts could not LEGALLY be sold, because the whole system needed to be approved. EVERY combination a company wanted to sell nneeded to be tested and approved. I know, because the company I was part of for 5 years spent 10s of thousands of dollars getting the systems we built approved - and then on top of that we spent another hundred grand or more getting ISO9000 certification so we could sell to government agencies.
The idiot MBA who "took over" the company started substituting parts on builds to "save money" - rendering the DOC (canadian) and CSA certifications void -------.
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I never saw FCC certifications on anything but parts that were clearly used for RF transmission or attachment to the POTS lines.

So in your case, it's the buyers that really ran the show and who probably wouldn't have bought your machines without certification. Lots of customers weren't so picky.
For me the simple equation was that selling clones them made it a business but assembling them for personal use made me a hobbyist.
Besides, in those days of people using illegal amplifiers on their CB radios, it was clear the FCC didn't (and probably still doesn't) have the resources to investigate, fine and confiscate the illegally boosted CB radios. So they weren't going after clone builders like me and IIRC, they didn't go after ANY clone makers that I ever heard of.
The same clone builders around the DC area advertised for years and years and only one, the guy I got my parts from, didn't sell assembled machines for the reasons you mentioned. But he did always have a line on the latest and greatest video card.
I find it amusing how much progress was made in the PC world because of gamers and overclockers. I knew gamers that got the new, latest and greatest video cards every few months and even brand new PC's when the new video cards required a new type of slot their machines lacked.

That's called "leadership" and your MBA was leading your company to the promised land of Bankruptcy just east of the River Jordan. (-"
--
Bobby G.



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On Sat, 10 Oct 2015 20:16:18 -0400, "Robert Green"

Used to be FCC or DOC on all computer compnents. I've got CD drives with FCC certs on them I haven't built a clone in almost 10 years, and it.s been 26 years since I was in the computer "manufacturing" business.

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<stuff snipped>

It's been a while for me too. I switched to all laptops because a) the power savings were substantial and b) the laptops are all the same configuration meaning I can take a Ghost backup from a dead laptop and easily reload it onto another machine. When I was using clones, each was subtly different from the other making restores to anything but the drive the backup was made on would fail.
I'll be going through all my old XT/AT parts to trash them this week so I will be able to review which items have FCC certs. I would suspect that hard drives, CDs and other items from name manufacturers have FCC IDs but I would be surprised if I see their mark on anything else.
--
Bobby G.



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On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 21:45:51 -0400, "Robert Green"

configured the same (production floor), and 7 to 9 at a time for the other office, where we are aiming to replace all computers on a rotating 4 year schedule. The last 3 batches have been close enough to identical that an image from one works on the next. Been using high end Acers (Veriton M46 series - 4618, 4620, and 4630 over the last 3 or 4 cycles) Also using the same Acers for office machines at the factory, replacing a mixed bag of clones, Dell and MDG crap. On the plant floor we are using refurbed Lenovos.
I've had 3 motherboard failures in the last batch of Acers at the plant - 4 hard drives over the last 3 years or so at the insurance office. Other than that the Acers have been VERY good.
The first batch of Lenovos, with XP Pro, purchaced at 3 years of age 4 years ago, have been failing at an accellerated rate the last 6 months or so (Old P4s) so we just got 25 matching Core 2 Duo machines on Win7Pro. The first batch replaced MAI terminals - mostly P4s but a handfull of Core 2 machines as well. The Core 2 machines have been rock solid - the P4 machines are suffering from swollen electrolytic capacitors - Lenovo got hit with the fake electrolyte "flu" like so many others - but the problem was cured before the Core 2 machines. came on line.
Deploying the 25 machines will keep me busy for a few weeks of Tuesday and Thursday afternoons - - - - -. I've got the software all installed - set up one machine then cloned the other 24 - so it will just be setting up machine names, configuring the user, and getting them onto the network.
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I didn't realize until I standardized on one particular machine (Fujitsu tablets) how remarkably convenient it is to be able to take an image from one machine and load it onto another - without getting the BSOD.

I'm user some ACER stuff now, and so far, so good.

I just had my first crapped out laptop HD and it failed without giving any warning. My machines see very light use so it's no wonder they've lasted 15 years. They've been so reliable that I haven't been backing up as regularly as I used to. That's because a good HD crash every now and then reminds you that they're just machines and as such, prone to failure at some point.

I have a lot of gear in the corner of the basement sitting on shelf waiting for me to open them up and look for bad caps. The TVs followed the well-known pattern of taking longer and longer to turn on until one day, they wouldn't. It's such a problem with stuff manufactured during the "flu" that there are eBay sellers who assemble kits of HQ caps for various TV models.

The beauty of identical machines. As a clone builder only for myself, I think I only have two identical machines that can accept each other's image files. Then I got religion and decided uniformity was a big asset. I seem to remember someone selling cloning machines that would take a list of user IDs, machine network names, etc. and use them to alter each clone so that it was ready to boot.
--
Bobby G.



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Robert Green wrote:

not all. Disappointed. Never worked on Hexadecimal ALU, stuffs like that? hard coax data transmission(not optical fiber). Computer manufacturing? Really? More likely it was assembly plant.
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wrote:

today. We actually had certain printed circuit boards designed and manufactured to our exclusive specs, as well as some of our cases - and in the early years - the "good years", consistancy was very good.
After the beancounters took over it was just a clone assembly shop and I was soon gone.
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I think it just turned out the PCs are a better fit for most businesses. A failed desktop CPU is a small problem, a failed mainframe CPU is a forking disaster. Keeping a "hot spare" server on line was a lot cheaper than dealing with a failed mainframe.
What I find remarkable is that we're gradually moving back to the mainframe terminal model with the cloud. That is until one day the cloud crashes and crashes hard. I'll bet there are teams in China, Russia and elsewhere working hard to make that happen. )-:

Here's a heart-chilling story about vulture capitalism and beans. (Cache version since the main Forbes URL didn't work).
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q che:IB- T6oISiGIJ:http://www.forbes.com/2009/10/06/simmons-bankruptcy- bailout-banks-opinions-columnists-dan-gerstein.html% 2Bmattress+company+saddled+with+enormous+debt&hl=en&&ct=clnk
http://preview.tinyurl.com/q67ts9x
http://tinyurl.com/q67ts9x
<<After being flipped six times in 20 years by a parade of private-equity firms, Simmons is drowning in debt it can't repay. It laid off 1,000 workers in a futile effort to cut costs. And now bondholders alone stand to lose $575 million. Yet the company's most recent owner, Thomas H. Lee Partners of Boston, has not only "escaped unscathed," it will be banking a $77 million profit after the sale of Simmons to the Ontario Teachers Pension Plan (announced Tuesday). How is this possible? Well, surprisingly enough, it's pretty darn easy. All you have to do is take what's called a "special dividend"-i.e., a self-dealing payoff-when you issue debt. That's what THL did in December 2004, when it put out a major debt issue that saddled Simmons with a high 10% interest rate and then paid itself a $137 million commission for the transaction.>> These aren't just bean counters, they're bean thieves.
--

Bobby G.






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