off topic: new car advice for senior

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On 10/08/2015 04:35 AM, Don Y wrote:

The guy that came up with Soylent couldn't jam it all into a tablet. I've been curious but they've suspended shipping due to some mold found on a couple of bottles.
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On 10/8/2015 5:35 AM, Don Y wrote:

When I went to elementary school my mom used to make sandwiches by the loaf. She'd make maybe 10 at a time, put them into sandwich bags, and then put all the sandwiches back into the bread wrapper. The whole thing would be put into the freezer and every morning she'd grab a sandwich for my lunch and it'd be thawed out by the time we went to lunch in the cafeteria.
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Maggie

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On 10/07/2015 11:36 AM, Don Y wrote:

One of the disappointments in my education was when I took a statistics course aimed at engineers. Much of it was along the line of how few pieces do we have to sample to ensure that only X% of the total production is defective.
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On 10/7/2015 6:43 PM, rbowman wrote:

cf Deming. We tend to be taught to test for defects as opposed to design quality *in*.
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On Tue, 06 Oct 2015 21:35:18 -0700, Don Y

Be forced to live with/use your own product. That might give some incentive.
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On 10/7/2015 1:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

But, people aren't. I've often ranted that folks like the MS weenies should find themselves on an operating table, sometime, and overhear the surgeon -- just as they are drifting off under the anesthesia -- say something like: "Wait! I've got a blue screen. We'll have to reboot..."
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It's the old, old question. "Why is there always enough time and money to do it twice, but never enough to do it right?"
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On 10/7/2015 3:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Exactly! I like to design various things, and usually create a prototype first to work out the kinks before I create something for a client. Solving design problems is fun and seeing the solution in the finished product is really satisfying especially when the feedback is what I was expecting from a good design.
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On 10/07/2015 02:18 PM, Muggles wrote:

The current buzzword in the software field is 'agile' but I've been doing it for years. Create a prototype that isn't fully functional but represents you're interpretation of what the client asked for. Show it to them and listen to what they really wanted. Rinse, and repeat.
It's depressing the number of people that don't want to take part in the process, prefer you to read their minds, and then bitch about what they get.
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wrote:

Didn't you know you are supposed to be a mind reader???
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On 10/07/2015 07:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sure. We have a special Psychics'R'Us division.
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On 10/7/2015 6:50 PM, rbowman wrote:

I won't play that game. Call me when you *know* what you want. It's not my role in life to show you things that you *might* want... had you but spent the time to THINK about your needs.
I try to understand my client's needs along with *his* market. Then, propose *my* solution. In the process, I am able to defend every one of my design decisions because I've *thought* about the problem -- instead of listening to the client's "first approximation" of the problem (which will change when he sees the consequences of that approximation).
Chances are, a client won't be able to come up with a better solution (of course, he can take MY solution and let someone else "iterate" it -- but it won't be *me*! :> )
If you want to play "no, let's see what the couch looks like against *that* wall", get someone else. You can't afford to pay me to wander through a universe of POTENTIAL solutions (and, I'm not keen on spending my life doing that!)
But, folks know this up front. Trust me -- or find someone who is willing to just cash your paychecks until you run out of patience or money or ideas...
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On 10/7/2015 8:50 PM, rbowman wrote:

I hear that!
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On 10/7/2015 1:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

EXACTLY! In my case, I have no desire to WASTE the portion of my life required for ONE of those attempts! I can't ask to have that time "refunded" to me because someone was too lazy or stupid to figure out how it *should* have been done.
If I asked you to dig a big hole in my yard (and *paid* you for it), how happy would you be if, once finished, I had you fill it in and dig it elsewhere? *If* you are paid for this, the first time you might just shrug thinking "hey, if he's got the money..."
But, you certainly wouldn't want to make a career out of that sort of thing. Where's the satisfaction in that??
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On 10/07/2015 04:47 PM, Don Y wrote:

That's why I've worked on one and only one DoD project. You really need the atitude of "Hey, the paychecks keep cashing."
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On 10/7/2015 6:53 PM, rbowman wrote:

I've never directlyworked on a DoD project -- though did work for a firm that subcontracted to a subcontrator who worked on a DoD project. For the most part, it was pretty uninspired. Throw lots of money at the project and you can make damn near *anything* work...
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On 10/07/2015 02:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

http://www.sixside.com/fast_good_cheap.asp
The other perennial engineering decision...
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the

every

time

Lots of people think it was marketing BUT others feel differently:
<<But another reader countered with a chronology of WordPerfect's self-inflicted wounds. "Frankly, WinWord 2.x was a great program, well ahead of its time, especially if you ran it on Windows 3.0/3.0a as opposed to 3.1x. WordPerfect 5.1 for Windows (Q4-1991) was a dismal failure -- totally unstable, not feature-laden, and it even used a DOS-based installation program! WordPerfect 5.2 (Q1-1992) was a massive bug-fix, albeit small & fast. WordPerfect 6.0 (Q4-1993) was another buggy piece of crap, but it showed potential. Only when WordPerfect 6.0a (April, 1994) came out was there something worthwhile on the Windows front. By mid-1994, 2 1/2 years after the first version of WordPerfect for Windows came out, was there something reasonably stable. But by then, the damage was done and MS-Office 4.2/4.3 was available.">> source:
http://www.infoworld.com/article/2639497/techology-business/how-did-wordperfect-go-wrong-.html
a.. In 1990, Microsoft started selling Microsoft Office, a suite that combined the very popular Excel with Word and PowerPoint. Anyone who wanted Excel (and lots of people did) could get Word for only a little bit more money. a.. WordPerfect was popular because it supported so many printers. Its huge driver library was a "moat" that prevented competitors from displacing it. But once Microsoft Windows became popular, printer manufacturers began creating drivers for Windows and its driver library grew faster. Source:
https://www.quora.com/Why-did-Microsoft-Word-beat-out-WordPerfect
--
Bobby G.



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On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 19:38:26 -0400, "Robert Green"

We just called it "WORD IMPERFECT" and "DATA IMPERFECT" was even worse!!!
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<stuff snipped>

We called them Word and Data DEFECT. At the precise time when competition entered the market, they chose to get stupid. Not good.
After the Lotus copy debacle the IT folks decided that anyone who wanted to run CP software had to product written justification and while some did, most did not. One very bad experience with CP made a lot of IT managers very wary of such software. It's an example of punishing the wrong people (the legit end users) for the crimes of others (thieves). Worse, still, there wasn't one CP program I knew of that couldn't be breached, often by running a small program that stayed in memory that convinced the program the original CD was in the player.
The death of WordStar is an even more fascinating story and a cautionary tale that execs and "vulture" capitalists should not treat programmers as fungible dirt.
http://www.dvorak.org/blog/whatever-happened-to-wordstar-2/
Dvorak brings up an important point:
<<During this era piracy sold software and created market share. People would use a bootleg copy of Wordstar and eventually buy a copy. Wordstar may have been the most pirated software in the world, which in many ways accounted for its success. (Software companies don't like to admit to this as a possibility.) >>
Piracy is a double-edged sword. In the beginning, the fact that you've got something *worthy* of pirating brings notice to your product. Notice publicity and publicity costs money, whether it's paying a PR firm or having users pass around a copy of your program to someone who likes it enough to buy a legit copy. (I confess I've done that several times when I was much, much poorer.)
RIAA noticed that the harder they cracked down on music piracy, the more music sales plummeted. To their credit, they eventually DID figure it out. They finally pulled back on their draconian "sue indigent grandmothers for (unknowingly) sharing music" policy. They were determined to maintain the "like one song, pay for 10" model of the CD but the failed and the pressure that piracy brought upon them was the basic cause. The flood of MP3 players that hit the market at the same time didn't hurt, either. (-; It ended up that more than a few parents banned their kids from having music of ANY kind on their PCs. Surely NOT the way to boost music sales.
I've read any number of articles that say Sony, who invented the Walkman, lost the portable music war because of their insistence on using a copy protection scheme just for Sony players. Their music division and their portable electronics division were at constant war over copy protection and in the end the big loser was the Sony empire.
http://archive.wired.com/wired/archive/11.02/sony_pr.html
<<Ando wants nothing less than for Sony to reinvent itself. But that will never happen as long as the company is frozen by its fear of piracy. Sony's digital Walkman device is a good example. Where the iPod simply lets you sync its contents with the music collection on your personal computer, Walkman users are hamstrung by laborious "check-in/check-out" procedures designed to block illicit file-sharing. And a Walkman with a hard drive? Not likely, since Sony's copy-protection mechanisms don't allow music to be transferred from one hard drive to another - not an issue with the iPod. "We do not have any plans for such a product," says Kimura, the smile fading. "But we are studying it.">>
So what's the point of copy protection if it's the first step on the path to irrelevance? People inclined to steal will always still, people not so inclined will not. No number of anti-piracy FBI scare warnings at the beginning of every DVD is going to change their mind. In fact, the constant lecturing may piss people off enough that they decide it's time to get DVD Decrypter or DVD Shrink.
--
Bobby G.



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